Anybody Else Experience This "Disconnect" With Certain Foods?
#1
I've never been able to eat fish (or indeed any sea animal) without gagging and experiencing a feeling of disgust. Everything about it, the texture of it while chewing, the smell of it, the look of the actual animal, the taste, absolutely repulse me. I've recently realized that I can't even really think of it, to myself, as food. It's as though someone says to me, when trying to convince me to "learn to like" fish: "You know, you really should learn to eat snails." (Never mind what the French do, just go with your gut feeling here). The only other person I've met who seems to be able to relate to this is a vegetarian who chose to be one because he was repulsed by meat, not out of concern for animal rights or health benefits, etc.

Has anyone else experienced anything like this, or am I just wired differently?  Unsure
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#2
(07-18-2013, 09:51 AM)Deidre Wrote: I've never been able to eat fish (or indeed any sea animal) without gagging and experiencing a feeling of disgust. Everything about it, the texture of it while chewing, the smell of it, the look of the actual animal, the taste, absolutely repulse me. I've recently realized that I can't even really think of it, to myself, as food. It's as though someone says to me, when trying to convince me to "learn to like" fish: "You know, you really should learn to eat snails." (Never mind what the French do, just go with your gut feeling here). The only other person I've met who seems to be able to relate to this is a vegetarian who chose to be one because he was repulsed by meat, not out of concern for animal rights or health benefits, etc.

Has anyone else experienced anything like this, or am I just wired differently?  Unsure

Sort of maybe. I've caught bits of a cable show where this guy goes around the world to eat the most disgusting things. I have to switch because many times it makes me sick.

On the fish front not so much. I prefer fish from the sea, but freshwater ones large enough to filet I eat too.I'm sorry on the snail front as well, I like them.

tim
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#3
Hey Deidre, since I offered you (another thread) all the soy products reserved for me, you can send Tim and me all the fish you have reserved for you!!!
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#4
Maybe ?

Lumache are Italian land snails that are small, and here's a recipe.

Lumache
Shell-stuffed field snails, prepared in the classic style of brandy, shallots, melted butter and garlic, with a touch of tomato sauce.

Scungili are sea snails and are made in a salad somewhat similar to the Spanish ceviche. The scungili and other ocean fish like shrimps and squid with celery and onions are sort of "cooked/pickled" in  olive oil, lemon, and tons of garlic. And I mean garlic.

2 die for !

tim
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#5
Oh, Tim, you're not helping!  LOL All right, change "snails" to "slugs." Nobody really wants to eat a slug, right?  Unsure
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#6
I grew up in a Jewish home so we did not eat pork.  Even though I know there is no moral wrong in eating pork according to our faith, I could never eat it.  It just wasn't appetizing.  Like most americans think of eating goat.

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#7
I can eat anything, or thought I could, until I first experienced the breakfast delicacy of the American South, biscuits and white sausage gravy. The white sausage gravy still makes me gag just to think about it. With Grits on the side. The grits didn't make me gag, but they sure are tasteless. Everything else for southern cuisine is top notch, especially the fish!
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#8
(07-19-2013, 01:14 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: I grew up in a Jewish home so we did not eat pork.  Even though I know there is no moral wrong in eating pork according to our faith, I could never eat it.  It just wasn't appetizing.  Like most americans think of eating goat.

I like goat! One of the most delicious meals I ever had was a goat stuffed with a lamb, stuffed with chickens, stuffed with hard boiled eggs and slow pit roasted! Smile
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#9
(07-19-2013, 01:48 AM)The Tax Collector Wrote: I can eat anything, or thought I could, until I first experienced the breakfast delicacy of the American South, biscuits and white sausage gravy. The white sausage gravy still makes me gag just to think about it. With Grits on the side. The grits didn't make me gag, but they sure are tasteless. Everything else for southern cuisine is top notch, especially the fish!

Son, you gotta problem with your taste buds?! LOL Biscuits and gravy with grits on the side and a couple of eggs fried over medium is a breakfast to die for (and I will, if I eat it too often)!
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#10
This will fit in here. When I transferred to Chicago Public High School they had this side dish every day. It was plain white rice and a sort of brownish gravy. It wasn't made from pan drippings from a roast the lady cooks made it every day. Fast forward five years and while waiting for a bus, I ran into one of those lady cooks again. I asked and she said it was a southern thing, and told me how to make it, but I completely forgot. If you took a bowl of that rice with a cheeseburger (she buttered the buns) and a cabbage slaw, it was a complete meal for 7 cents. Add a slice of homemade banana cream pie and three chocolate milks and it was 18 cents. I was rich I worked after school and made 65 cents an hour. I'll bet Jovan remembers numbers like those. The meals were underwritten but those deserts and choc. milk were not.

That gravy was spicy but not hot, it was 1963 after all, and man o man I liked that southern comfort.

tim
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