Anybody Else Experience This "Disconnect" With Certain Foods?
#11
(07-19-2013, 01:48 AM)The Tax Collector Wrote: I can eat anything, or thought I could, until I first experienced the breakfast delicacy of the American South, biscuits and white sausage gravy. The white sausage gravy still makes me gag just to think about it. With Grits on the side. The grits didn't make me gag, but they sure are tasteless. Everything else for southern cuisine is top notch, especially the fish!

My aunt, whose Daddy was from South Carolina, has made sausage gravy and biscuits all of my life- but I had a shock when I moved to the South about nine years ago and experienced the original!  :LOL: There was considerably more gravy, and hardly any sausage at all. My aunt puts a whole "roll" of spicy sausage meat into one recipe, and adds extra spices. The thick, tasteless stuff in restaurants just can't compete!
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#12
(07-19-2013, 01:14 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: I grew up in a Jewish home so we did not eat pork.  Even though I know there is no moral wrong in eating pork according to our faith, I could never eat it.  It just wasn't appetizing.  Like most americans think of eating goat.

I hadn't thought of this situation, but it makes perfect sense.  :)
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#13
(07-18-2013, 09:51 AM)Deidre Wrote: I've never been able to eat fish (or indeed any sea animal) without gagging and experiencing a feeling of disgust. Everything about it, the texture of it while chewing, the smell of it, the look of the actual animal, the taste, absolutely repulse me. I've recently realized that I can't even really think of it, to myself, as food. It's as though someone says to me, when trying to convince me to "learn to like" fish: "You know, you really should learn to eat snails." (Never mind what the French do, just go with your gut feeling here). The only other person I've met who seems to be able to relate to this is a vegetarian who chose to be one because he was repulsed by meat, not out of concern for animal rights or health benefits, etc.

Has anyone else experienced anything like this, or am I just wired differently?  :Hmm:

Don't children sometimes have this reaction?  My niece had the exact same reaction to fish when she was little.  She still (now she's a teen) doesn't like fish, but manages better.  She also still has a thing about all kinds of berries - she doesn't like the little seeds.

I used to react this way to tapioca pudding.  Fortunately I do better now, because my niece (the same one!) likes to make tapioca pudding - it is one of her specialties.  I prefer her brownies.

I had "escargot", once or twice.  Well maybe once.  Wasn't bad, drowned in butter.

Bugs and slugs... I'll pass.
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#14
I think the thing about snails is most americans don't eat them when they're little. It is not an american staple, and I'd bet it wasn't an english or dutch common food going back to the beginning. California is lousy with them and for some reason they are ignored. Italo-americans would be harvesting them, along with mushrooms, and cardoon, and other wild food. I remember a camping fishing trip with three brothers from our neighborhood who were also Northern Italians originally from near Austria at Madonna d' Campiglio, near Pinzone. We happened on a delicacy named fumf farfalle. It's a word half Austrian and half Italian. My spelling could be off, but fumf for five in Austrian, and farfalle for butterfly in Italian. We spent more time hunting them than fishing.I also remember hunting cardoon along the horse trails in Lincoln Park with my uncle Michelangelo as a kid. They grow especially well fertilized with horseshit.

tim
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