Anti-popes during interregnum?
#11
Yes one of the saints of today had to contend with an antipope;
  A native of Sardinia, Symmachus was serving as archdeacon of Rome when he was chosen to become pope in 498. His election was immediately opposed by a segment of the Roman clergy who went so far as to elect an antipope on the very same day that Symmachus had been elected. The antipope and his followers embittered the early years of Symmachus’ pontificate. When at length the schism ended, Symmachus expressed his gratitude in an inscription on a church monument: “The biting of the wolves has ceased.” Symmachus sent material assistance to the bishops of North Africa living in exile on his native island of Sardinia, who had been banished from their sees by the heretical king Thrasimund. The pontiff also sent the bishops relics of the martyrs to give them spiritual solace. His charity was likewise expended upon ransoming captives, founding three hospices for the needy, and relieving the victims of barbarian raids in northern Italy. It was Pope Symmachus who first expanded the use of the Gloria at Mass beyond its original utilization as a hymn heard only once a year at the Christmas Midnight Mass.

http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=5838
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#12
(07-18-2013, 05:07 PM)2Vermont Wrote: What made them anti-popes?

They all opposed the elected, reigning Pope.  Usually there was a lot of politics involved--some princes wouldn't like the Pope who ended up being elected, so they would pressure Cardinals from their area to get together and elect a new "Pope." 

It should be noted, none of the antipopes, as far as I know, were "elected" during an interregnum, and none were accepted by the whole Church.  The one's listed spanned multiple real papacies, which is why they were around during an interregnum.
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#13
(07-19-2013, 07:40 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote:
(07-18-2013, 05:07 PM)2Vermont Wrote: What made them anti-popes?

They all opposed the elected, reigning Pope.  Usually there was a lot of politics involved--some princes wouldn't like the Pope who ended up being elected, so they would pressure Cardinals from their area to get together and elect a new "Pope." 

It should be noted, none of the antipopes, as far as I know, were "elected" during an interregnum, and none were accepted by the whole Church.  The one's listed spanned multiple real papacies, which is why they were around during an interregnum.

OK, thank you.  I thought it was something like that.  I didn't think that the Church ever had anti-popes that were the only sitting pope at the time.
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#14
(07-19-2013, 01:18 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: Wait, an antipope was canonized?  Huh?

I'm thoroughly confused

As Jovan mentioned, St. Hippolytus was reconciled and martyred.  It's an interesting story.  During a persecution, the pagan emperor decided to round up all the Christian leaders and send them to a salt mine--he didn't care who was the real bishop of Rome, so he sent both St. Pontianus and St. Hippolytus to the mine.  There they met and Hippolytus was impressed by Pontianus holiness that he was reconciled and wrote a letter to his followers to reconcile.  Sts. Pontianus and Hippolyus were both martyred and now share a feast day.

As an aside, some of his writings sound like they could be found in certain traditionalist websites and publications today.  See chapters 1, 2, 6, and 7 here (the whole work is on "all" heresies, and these chapters deal with those of the purported Catholic Church of Popes Sts. Zephyrinius and Callistus):

http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/050109.htm

Just replace Sabellianism with Modernism, and the names of Sts. Callistus and Zephyrinius and others with those of more recent Popes and churchmen, and it sounds very much like some things written today--right down to the mention of widespread contraception use among the faithful as additional evidence that they do not possess the faith. I also find his accusations of double-speak and conspiracy to unite heretics and orthodox believers in one Church to be an interesting parallel.
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#15
(07-18-2013, 07:49 PM)Geremia Wrote:
(07-18-2013, 07:47 PM)St. Pius of Trent Wrote: John XXIII was an anti-pope?
Yes, there was an antipope John XXIII. The 20th century John XXIII chose that name to make it even more certain that the antipope one was an antipope. (Although some crazy conspiracy theorists say he chose it because he wanted to be antipope… haha.)

I would be careful with calling these folks "crazy".  Although I wouldn't say he chose it because he "wanted" to be anti-pope, I definitely question whether it was such a good idea.  After all, he did start the whole Vatican II mess.
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#16
(07-19-2013, 07:49 AM)2Vermont Wrote:
(07-18-2013, 07:49 PM)Geremia Wrote:
(07-18-2013, 07:47 PM)St. Pius of Trent Wrote: John XXIII was an anti-pope?
Yes, there was an antipope John XXIII. The 20th century John XXIII chose that name to make it even more certain that the antipope one was an antipope. (Although some crazy conspiracy theorists say he chose it because he wanted to be antipope… haha.)

I would be careful with calling these folks "crazy".  Although I wouldn't say he chose it because he "wanted" to be anti-pope, I definitely question whether it was such a good idea.  After all, he did start the whole Vatican II mess.
Yes, we can judge fruit, but only God can judge intentions. Thus, they're "crazy" for thinking they can judge intentions.
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