The Role of Women
#11
(07-31-2013, 02:53 PM)divinesilence80 Wrote: Studies show its a fathers spiritual life that more greatly influences the children to stay in regular church attendance than mothers.

I'd be very interested in seeing those if you have a link to them, or can point me in the right direction. 
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#12
I'll repeat what a holy Eastern Catholic monk once told me!

Traditionally, both east and west, women did have 'roles' in the Church (esp. in the liturgy) that are so coveted nowdays. But the thing is that these women are always special. They weren't just Sister Rainbow and Mrs. Hipster from down the street. They were consecrated women, usually extremely mortified, usually cloistered (to a lesser or greater degree) and would bite your head off if you even mentioned the words women and priest in the same sentence. In these cases, the tradition is there that women can play a role in some way. But it's a proper role - not role-playing, which is actually what so many of these people want. 

Some Latin nuns (can't remember if it was Carthusians or another) used to read the Epistle, and expose and repose the Blessed Sacrament. Some Eastern nuns did a few similar things too. But these weren't women to mess around with. They spent their lives in penance and prayer. And so in a sense they 'earned' their role (though of course I know the phrasing is wrong here and it cannot be earned but you get what I mean). They are serious women with seriously Catholic beliefs who are serious about liturgy and serious about faith and morals. Contrast that with the average liberal Catholic who wants to see women priests. They are usually aging hippies who support all sorts of sexual sin and other moral perversions. They couldn't care less about liturgy, and the only mortification they do is not eating a third twinkie. It's the same as seeing Abbesses with a mitre and crosier. She's a stern, pious lady who doesn't take nonsense.

The standard is always Our Lady. Always always always. Hidden, mortified, pious, modest, humble, obedient. When we start seeing these kinds of women ask for a greater role then it should be taken seriously. But that's the point: these kinds will never demand or ask for a greater role or a spotlight or a microphone. They don't want the star on Broadway. They want nothing more than to be a forgotten nothing, giving Jesus all the glory and letting His pastors take control.
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#13
(07-31-2013, 02:56 PM)Sant Anselmo Wrote:
(07-31-2013, 02:53 PM)divinesilence80 Wrote: Studies show its a fathers spiritual life that more greatly influences the children to stay in regular church attendance than mothers.

I'd be very interested in seeing those if you have a link to them, or can point me in the right direction. 

http://www.fisheaters.com/menandchurch2.html


From the article, "The Critical Factor

In 1994 the Swiss carried out an extra survey that the researchers for our masters in Europe (I write from England) were happy to record. The question was asked to determine whether a person’s religion carried through to the next generation, and if so, why, or if not, why not. The result is dynamite. There is one critical factor. It is overwhelming, and it is this: It is the religious practice of the father of the family that, above all, determines the future attendance at or absence from church of the children.

If both father and mother attend regularly, 33 percent of their children will end up as regular churchgoers, and 41 percent will end up attending irregularly. Only a quarter of their children will end up not practicing at all. If the father is irregular and mother regular, only 3 percent of the children will subsequently become regulars themselves, while a further 59 percent will become irregulars. Thirty-eight percent will be lost.

If the father is non-practicing and mother regular, only 2 percent of children will become regular worshippers, and 37 percent will attend irregularly. Over 60 percent of their children will be lost completely to the church.

Let us look at the figures the other way round. What happens if the father is regular but the mother irregular or non-practicing? Extraordinarily, the percentage of children becoming regular goes up from 33 percent to 38 percent with the irregular mother and to 44 percent with the non-practicing, as if loyalty to father’s commitment grows in proportion to mother’s laxity, indifference, or hostility.

Before mothers despair, there is some consolation for faithful moms. Where the mother is less regular than the father but attends occasionally, her presence ensures that only a quarter of her children will never attend at all.

Even when the father is an irregular attender there are some extraordinary effects. An irregular father and a non-practicing mother will yield 25 percent of their children as regular attenders in their future life and a further 23 percent as irregulars. This is twelve times the yield where the roles are reversed.

Where neither parent practices, to nobody’s very great surprise, only 4 percent of children will become regular attenders and 15 percent irregulars. Eighty percent will be lost to the faith.

While mother’s regularity, on its own, has scarcely any long-term effect on children’s regularity (except the marginally negative one it has in some circumstances), it does help prevent children from drifting away entirely. Faithful mothers produce irregular attenders. Non-practicing mothers change the irregulars into non-attenders. But mothers have even their beneficial influence only in complementarity with the practice of the father.

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#14
I don't know what a 'theology of woman" could even be like...?
Perhaps emulation of Our Lady's virtues, perhaps something connected with bringing children in the world? Perhaps consecrated virginity?

Regarding leadership roles for women, if this was important to Our Lord He would have implimented it in the beginning. The Pope should realize that this whole push for women priestesses is part of an overall goal to neutralize the Church and therefore the faith in the public square.
They want to modernize the Church so there is no opposition to the modern zeitgeist, much like the united Church in Canada or the Anglicans. They represent no resistance to the onslaught of socialist propaganda.

I promised to give the Holy Father six months before I made up my mind about him, but all I can say now is it ain't looking good.
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#15
(07-31-2013, 03:45 PM)GGG Wrote:
(07-31-2013, 02:56 PM)Sant Anselmo Wrote:
(07-31-2013, 02:53 PM)divinesilence80 Wrote: Studies show its a fathers spiritual life that more greatly influences the children to stay in regular church attendance than mothers.

I'd be very interested in seeing those if you have a link to them, or can point me in the right direction. 

http://www.fisheaters.com/menandchurch2.html

Thanks.  I will endeavor to track down the original investigation from that link and see if I can find it.  Most people will be more convinced when the original data is presented, and I have seen too many cases where a study was misinterpreted in the popular media, in blogs, etc. to include my own more than once.  I am not saying that happened here, but I have learned to be cautious on such things. 
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#16
http://www.catholicvote.org/what-the-chu...out-women/

BY EMILY STIMPSON
Pope Francis caused some eyebrows to go up last week when he remarked, in an offhand way, that, “We don’t have a deep theology of women in the church.”

I’m not sure if anything is being lost in translation, but, as Pat Gohn pointed out in her Washington Post op-ed today, the real problem isn’t that the Church doesn’t have a deep theology of women. We do. We’ve actually got the richest, deepest, and most beautiful theology around. Could it be deeper? Sure. What theology couldn’t be? But the real problem isn’t the lack of a deep theology; it’s that there is no widespread recognition or understanding of that theology.
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#17
What the Church really lacks is a theology of the masculine. Of coarse the feminine won't make much sense without the masculine and vice versa. Duh!
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