Still rude in the NO:
#1
Talking on a cell phone during Mass.

Not very often, someone's cell phone might go off during Mass, but when it does it's immediately silenced and everyone forgets about it.  Not so this time: at Mass in my parish, someone got a call and decided to carry on a conversation with the caller!  No scurrying off to the cry room or slipping out the back door or "I'll call you back."

And no, this didn't happen during the Children's Liturgical Club's rousing performance of "The Merry-Go Round Broke Down" while the Worship Dance Team did somersaults and pole danced around the altar (these things would actually make people in my parish leave Mass and go someplace else if they actually happened, plus the parish doesn't have any kids or anyone with the energy for those kinds of dances anyway).  It happened during the homily.

My priest had just got done telling the parish that a cousin, one of many relatives of his who happened to be a priest, had become sick while traveling home to India and died in a hospital in Doha, Qatar, and that the family had a great deal of trouble retrieving the body from there.  The visiting priest, a Congolese father from a mission in the Congo (making him a Congolese Congolese priest serving in the Congo) had just begun his discussion of his order's efforts to fight child soldiering.

Of course, this being church, it would have highly offended the person on the cell phone if the priest, the ushers, or anyone else asked her to stop talking on her phone during Mass.  No one said anything to her (as far as I know) and she eventually said that she had to go and ended the call after about five minutes.

It seems to me like some people's feelings get hurt awful easily where church is considered, and they won't be back if that happens.  Don't anyone dare tell them that they need to attend at least every week.
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#2
Sorry brah I just really had to speak to her. I'll call at a different time next time around!
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#3
(08-11-2013, 11:40 AM)dark lancer Wrote: Talking on a cell phone during Mass.

Not very often, someone's cell phone might go off during Mass, but when it does it's immediately silenced and everyone forgets about it.  Not so this time: at Mass in my parish, someone got a call and decided to carry on a conversation with the caller!  No scurrying off to the cry room or slipping out the back door or "I'll call you back."

And no, this didn't happen during the Children's Liturgical Club's rousing performance of "The Merry-Go Round Broke Down" while the Worship Dance Team did somersaults and pole danced around the altar (these things would actually make people in my parish leave Mass and go someplace else if they actually happened, plus the parish doesn't have any kids or anyone with the energy for those kinds of dances anyway).  It happened during the homily.

My priest had just got done telling the parish that a cousin, one of many relatives of his who happened to be a priest, had become sick while traveling home to India and died in a hospital in Doha, Qatar, and that the family had a great deal of trouble retrieving the body from there.  The visiting priest, a Congolese father from a mission in the Congo (making him a Congolese Congolese priest serving in the Congo) had just begun his discussion of his order's efforts to fight child soldiering.

Of course, this being church, it would have highly offended the person on the cell phone if the priest, the ushers, or anyone else asked her to stop talking on her phone during Mass.  No one said anything to her (as far as I know) and she eventually said that she had to go and ended the call after about five minutes.

It seems to me like some people's feelings get hurt awful easily where church is considered, and they won't be back if that happens.  Don't anyone dare tell them that they need to attend at least every week.

Dark Lancer, the church is not a solemn place anymore at mass. I see the exact same thing in my own church, and no one will stand up and say anything. Worse still than the calls are the large amount of people who text and surf on their smartphones throughout the mass; makes you wonder why they even came, but when the KOC ushers are seen doing the same thing, how do you establish an example for the youth?
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#4
The lectors at the NO I attend tell everyone to make sure their phones are turned off right before Mass begins.

Must work because immediately after the announcement, we often hear a few phones turning off with the various sounds they make. I haven't heard a cell phone ring since the parish started this practice. They have signs at the entrances telling us to turn them off as well.
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#5
The worst part is no one said anything.

Is there a TLM in your area?
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#6
I have heard phones going off at the TLM, too.  also I have seen grown men replying to a text. 
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#7
(08-11-2013, 12:24 PM)The Tax Collector Wrote: Worse still than the calls are the large amount of people who text and surf on their smartphones throughout the mass;

I don't see how texting is worse than talking. ??? On 'surfing', this has been discussed before, but how do you know they are surfing. I have the DR Bible, the Little Office and the Breviarum Romanum all bookmarked on my phone. It's more convenient than carrying the books and if I'm at an NO Mass, I'm probably reciting the Office if you see me 'surfing' on my phone.
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#8
Only worse because of the amount of people who are on smartphones vs outright talking.

To be honest, maybe every one of them is following the mass on smartphone, I just never see engagement in the mass whenever I notice it.

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#9
I've seen parents give their kids (ages 5 through 12, probably) cell phones to shut them up. This has happened at TLM as well. The first time I saw this I just assumed a NO family wandered into the TLM by accident (they even did the orans position) and didn't want to leave and would offer this boring experience up to GOD. But it seems like cellphone usage happens more often than I would like to see. I definitely don't have a problem with someone using an app/ebook on their cellphones/tablets to follow along with the mass but you can tell when someone is surfing the web or texting as their fingers are constantly tapping away. I never have the need to tappity tap tap when reading a paper book or ebook, so this is how I am able to distinguish those who surf and those who are using technology for the faith.

How about priests using tablets instead of paper liturgical books? Any objections? Will ebooks eventually lead to e-incense and e-candles? holy water apps?
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#10
The NO parish I used to go to always seemed to have someone's cell phone going off during the elevation of the host.  Eventually one priest had the idea to re-introduce the practice of an later server ringing a hand bell. I'm not sure if the two were related somehow. :LOL:
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