The Zairan Rite
#1
So I was looking up the order of the religious priest from the Congo who visited my parish this weekend, and it turns out that, according to Wikipedia, there was approved a rite in Zaire in 1988 which includes liturgical song and dance.  Has anyone heard of it?
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#2
Were they pagans of the congo that we allowed to continue their dances only if they performed them in the name of GOD? It seems like a lot of those VII allowances came about that way.
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#3
"The Zaire Use is a variation of the common mass of the Roman Catholic Church. While containing many of the elements of the Ordinary Form of the mass of the Roman Rite, it incorporates elements from sub-Saharan African culture, a process referred to as "inculturation". It is used to a very limited extent in some African countries since the late 1970s." Wikipedia.




haha this video is my nightmare. Before watching this video I felt like all NO masses were like this but after seeing this I know it CAN get worse than the average NO. If that makes sense?
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#4
(08-11-2013, 04:34 PM)MorganHiver Wrote: Were they pagans of the congo that we allowed to continue their dances only if they performed them in the name of GOD? It seems like a lot of those VII allowances came about that way.

That's how the America's became Christian .
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#5
(08-11-2013, 05:47 PM)CatholicLife Wrote:
(08-11-2013, 04:34 PM)MorganHiver Wrote: Were they pagans of the congo that we allowed to continue their dances only if they performed them in the name of GOD? It seems like a lot of those VII allowances came about that way.

That's how the Americas became Christian .
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#6
(08-11-2013, 04:34 PM)MorganHiver Wrote: Were they pagans of the congo that we allowed to continue their dances only if they performed them in the name of GOD? It seems like a lot of those VII allowances came about that way.

That's actually how a lot of Europe became Christian too, at least to a certain extent. Read about the Venerable Bede versus Pope Saint Gregory the Great.
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#7
Archbishop Lefebvre approved of some African influenes in the liturgy when he was bishop of Dakar. I think he drew the line with liturgical dance and bongo drums though.  :)

I think one day when Asia becomes Christianized, it would be good to have Asian rites.  Maybe a Mongolian rite?  :)
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#8
(08-11-2013, 06:31 PM)christulsa123 Wrote: Archbishop Lefebvre approved of some African influenes in the liturgy when he was bishop of Dakar. I think he drew the line with liturgical dance and bongo drums though.  :)

I think one day when Asia becomes Christianized, it would be good to have Asian rites.  Maybe a Mongolian rite?  :)

India already has (or had) the Latin Rite, the Syro-Malabar Rite, and the Syro-Malankara Rite, all as Catholic rites in Communion with Rome.  There's also the Oriental Catholic Church.

My priest (who is from India) once said that a past bishop of my diocese asked him if India had any Catholics, and actually had no idea that Catholicism was introduced to India by St. Thomas where it thrived.
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#9
(08-11-2013, 06:38 PM)dark lancer Wrote:
(08-11-2013, 06:31 PM)christulsa123 Wrote: Archbishop Lefebvre approved of some African influenes in the liturgy when he was bishop of Dakar. I think he drew the line with liturgical dance and bongo drums though.  :)

I think one day when Asia becomes Christianized, it would be good to have Asian rites.  Maybe a Mongolian rite?  :)

India already has (or had) the Latin Rite, the Syro-Malabar Rite, and the Syro-Malankara Rite, all as Catholic rites in Communion with Rome.  There's also the Oriental Catholic Church.

My priest (who is from India) once said that a past bishop of my diocese asked him if India had any Catholics, and actually had no idea that Catholicism was introduced to India by St. Thomas where it thrived.

That's interesting, I didn't know there is an Oriental Catholic Church.

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#10
Not surprised that one of todays priests didn't know India had any Catholics.
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