Oh come let us adore Him
#11
(08-12-2013, 06:17 AM)Cetil Wrote: Father Zuhlsdorf's column might help: "First, one of the reasons why priests and bishops don’t follow the norms is because with the Novus Ordo, there was no longer in the norms published in the missal itself, in the forward or praenotanda, the stern reminder that certain serious faults and flaws in celebration of Mass were mortal sins.
Rubrics and their implications are a matter of moral theology.  The older, pre-Conciliar missal is clear that when a priest violates some points of the rubrics, he commits a sin.
When sin was detached from observance of the norms, priests and bishops – who often have pride problems like everyone else – were off the leash."

http://wdtprs.com/blog/2013/02/why-dont-...lly-rants/

Thanks, Cetil, for the relevant information.  This is what we wail, complain, rant about.  What a mess!
Reply
#12
Indeed it is Vincentius. May God guide all the clergy to better things.

C.
Reply
#13
(08-13-2013, 10:45 PM)Vincentius Wrote: Optional?  You mean when the priest raises the Host and then the Chalice, isn't that an act that this rubric requires a response of adoration?    How do we express our adoration, pay honor and reverent homage?  Just stare and say nothing?  If the congregation is not taught that adoration of the True Presence requires nothing in particular is probably why many do not bother to go to Mass or are there to go to Communion because everybody else does.

Of course we're supposed to worship the Host and Chalice, but it was always my understanding that only the priest's words (this is my body, this is my blood) are essential. The priest has rubrics, people don't. We were taught by the nuns in gradeschool to say silently to ourselves during the consecration: "My Lord and my God" - but it could have been something else in my mother's time, or my grandmother's time, etc. Why not say "O come let us adore him.." OR "Jesus, mercy" or something else? Nobody but God can hear you anyway.
Reply
#14
(08-14-2013, 10:44 AM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(08-13-2013, 10:45 PM)Vincentius Wrote: Optional?  You mean when the priest raises the Host and then the Chalice, isn't that an act that this rubric requires a response of adoration?    How do we express our adoration, pay honor and reverent homage?  Just stare and say nothing?  If the congregation is not taught that adoration of the True Presence requires nothing in particular is probably why many do not bother to go to Mass or are there to go to Communion because everybody else does.

Of course we're supposed to worship the Host and Chalice, but it was always my understanding that only the priest's words (this is my body, this is my blood) are essential. The priest has rubrics, people don't. We were taught by the nuns in gradeschool to say silently to ourselves during the consecration: "My Lord and my God" - but it could have been something else in my mother's time, or my grandmother's time, etc. Why not say "O come let us adore him.." OR "Jesus, mercy" or something else? Nobody but God can hear you anyway.

The whole Liturgy is a rubric, isn't it?  Like I showed, every action, nuance, prayer, and responses (more so in the N.O.with the congregation participating), etc.  The traditional "My Lord and My God" has always been the proper and desired response because they are words which St. Thomas the Apostle exclaimed when he, once an unbeliever, has now believed when he saw and felt the wounds of Our Lord, who said to him, "Now you have seen and believed; blessed are those who have not seen yet have believed."  This is the Mystery of Faith (Mysterium Fidei) -- Transubstantiation, the bread substantiated into Real Flesh of Our Lord, etc., not the acclamation, "Christ has died, Christ has risen, Christ will come again," and others acclamations.  I supposed we each have our own way of expressing our adoration but the priest cannot tell the congregation what he would have them say what he thinks is his way of expression and throw away 2100 years of Tradition.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)