Did the Virgin Mary die?
#11
http://www.instituteofcatholicculture.or...ssumption/  (  Body and Soul: A Study of the Feast of the Assumption) here is an interesting talk by  Deacon Sabatino Carnazzo  from the  Melkite Greek-Catholic Church. he discuss's this  from the Eastern , Latin and Orthodox traditions.also kicks some prot ass  :grin:
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#12
Are there any Saints, Fathers, or other authorities that have argued that she did not die?
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#13
(08-14-2013, 06:32 PM)Unum Sint Wrote: Put me in the column of those that DO NOT believe she suffered death.

It may be assuming too much, however I put my self in the shoes of Our Lord and ask my self if I a sinner who had authority to spare my own mother, also a sinner, death would do so without blinking. Then what more could the savior He to whom all authority has been given would do for his sinless mother?

My money is on, The Lord would not let death touch His mother.

The liturgy is part of the infallible tradition of the Church, so that the Virgin died isn't up for discussion.
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#14
(08-15-2013, 12:24 PM)Melkite Wrote:
(08-14-2013, 06:32 PM)Unum Sint Wrote: Put me in the column of those that DO NOT believe she suffered death.

It may be assuming too much, however I put my self in the shoes of Our Lord and ask my self if I a sinner who had authority to spare my own mother, also a sinner, death would do so without blinking. Then what more could the savior He to whom all authority has been given would do for his sinless mother?

My money is on, The Lord would not let death touch His mother.

The liturgy is part of the infallible tradition of the Church

:eyeroll:
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#15
Interesting that the Byzantine tradition is to call the Assumption the Holy Dormition.... which would allude to the "falling asleep" as opposed to dying.... 
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#16
(08-15-2013, 01:49 PM)devoutchristian Wrote:
(08-15-2013, 12:24 PM)Melkite Wrote:
(08-14-2013, 06:32 PM)Unum Sint Wrote: Put me in the column of those that DO NOT believe she suffered death.

It may be assuming too much, however I put my self in the shoes of Our Lord and ask my self if I a sinner who had authority to spare my own mother, also a sinner, death would do so without blinking. Then what more could the savior He to whom all authority has been given would do for his sinless mother?

My money is on, The Lord would not let death touch His mother.

The liturgy is part of the infallible tradition of the Church

:eyeroll:

C'est vrai, mon frère.
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#17
(08-15-2013, 04:02 PM)catholicschoolmom Wrote: Interesting that the Byzantine tradition is to call the Assumption the Holy Dormition.... which would allude to the "falling asleep" as opposed to dying.... 

Except that they also refer to the general dead as those who 'have fallen asleep in the Lord' and that Byzantine iconography almost always depicts the Assumption as Her being taken up from a funeral bier.
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#18
(08-15-2013, 04:06 PM)Melkite Wrote:
(08-15-2013, 01:49 PM)devoutchristian Wrote:
(08-15-2013, 12:24 PM)Melkite Wrote:
(08-14-2013, 06:32 PM)Unum Sint Wrote: Put me in the column of those that DO NOT believe she suffered death.

It may be assuming too much, however I put my self in the shoes of Our Lord and ask my self if I a sinner who had authority to spare my own mother, also a sinner, death would do so without blinking. Then what more could the savior He to whom all authority has been given would do for his sinless mother?

My money is on, The Lord would not let death touch His mother.

The liturgy is part of the infallible tradition of the Church

:eyeroll:

C'est vrai, mon frère.

No it's not. The liturgy is not infallible. To say that it is part of revelation is to embrace Archeologism.
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#19
Well, not sure it matters, but the bishop at Latin Mass last night said "after her death".
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#20
(08-16-2013, 07:20 AM)2Vermont Wrote: Well, not sure it matters, but the bishop at Latin Mass last night said "after her death".

He should not have said that.  Rather, he should have said, "After her earthly life," or something to that effect.  In the Roman Catholic Church, this question is not settled.

My SSPX priest told us during adult catechism that it is his opinion that Our Lady probably died, because it was fitting for her to be conformed to her Son in that way.  But again, he stressed that the Church has no teaching on whether or not she died.

The eastern Church teaches that she died and was assumed into heaven.  They also observe this feast on August 15th and call it her dormition, or "falling asleep."

As an Old Catholic, I believe Our Lady's assumption should not have been dogmatized, although I certainly believe it.
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