Google Maps: Jewish Washington, D.C.
#1


Isn't it nice of Google to make it easy for the Jewish people of Washington, D.C. to carry things outside of their houses on the Sabbath?

In case you're not hip to what eruvim ("eruv" is the singular) are, they're boundaries set up around Jewish neighborhoods that allow practitioners of Judaism to do things outside of their houses on the Sabbath that otherwise wouldn't be kosher. (next time you hear about Jewish "ghettoes" -- i.e., neighborhoods where Jews lived during the bad, old, medieeeeeeeval "superstitious" times, even all the way into the 18th century, when the Jewish people had it really bad in Poland (just ask Pope Benedict XIV) -- remember that Jews need it that way unless they want to be pretty much confined to their houses on Saturdays). Anyway, as an example, carrying things is one of the things forbidden to do outside of the home on Saturdays, for ex. So the Pharisaic way around that is to "extend the walls of one's home" by stringing wire around the neighborhood (try this page to see if there's an eruv near you). Read more about eruvim here.

Anywhere, here's Google's map of eruvim in the Washington, D.C. area. Click on one of the names at the left hand side to see where the eruvim show up. Wonder if they'd have done the same sort of thing for Catholics if we had laws about carrying things outside or our homes on Sundays! Actually, I don't wonder that. I know the answer.




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#2

I might owe to Google with regard to my having intimated that they had something to do, directly, with the maps of the eruvim! Apparently, people can add their businesses to Google maps and such, so maybe the eruvim listings fall into the same category... On the other hand, when going about listing a business, there's a form with a place for "address," not "boundaries" (obviously), so ---  eh.. My point is that it's possible Google itself had nothing to do with the listing of these eruvim. But my first thought -- and my third thought, after thinking about the difficulties involved in highlighting large areas like that -- make me think that I was likely right about Google having something to do with it.... Bottom line, though:  I'm just not sure.
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#3
Well just try their search engine. "Jew" "Jewish" entered for search always brings up a notice on bottom for "offensive search results." It's an apology because someone may have said something unkind about them.

It's the ONLY search term to do this.
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#4
I checked the one for St. Louis for giggles, and it was right where i thought it would be. Actually, it extends slightly further north than I thought it would. While St. Louis has a fairly healthy jewish population, the Orthodox are almost completely centered in an area that straddles the city/county line. Page Ave forms the northern boundary, Clayton Road the south, with Warson Rd and Skinker Blvd as the western and eastern boundaries respectively. Anyone in St. louis can tell you that's the jewish side of town. It's also got the only local jewish cemetaries, and based off a zip code search there are more synagogues in that area than any other sort of religious congregation. On the far western side of that area, by Olive and Lindbergh, a new Jewish Community Center, complete with housing and a Holocaust Museum were constructed just a few years ago. Most of the jewish area is relatively modest middle class housing (It's the reform jews in St. Louis that are wealthy, the orthodox are almost always middle class here), but it gets more affluent the closer you get to Clayton.

I was kind of surprised. I had thought that the jewish section stopped at Olive road as it's far northern boundary, which is one inner belt exit down from Page; Olive and the inner belt is where China Town starts, but according to the map the Eruvim goes even farther north.
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#5
(08-13-2013, 11:24 PM)Ursus Wrote: Well just try their search engine. "Jew" "Jewish" entered for search always brings up a notice on bottom for "offensive search results." It's an apology because someone may have said something unkind about them.

It's the ONLY search term to do this.

Which is pretty unreal when you consider the so incredibly BLATANT anti-Catholicism (anti-Christianity in general, for that matter) stuff that's out there. And not hidden in the dark nooks and crannies of the internet, consisting of a handful of websites Google takes it upon itself to warn you about -- the same ones the SPLC and ADL are already warning the world about (because, of course, the 2% of the American population that just happens to be the wealthiest and just happens to run almost all of the TV networks and studios, neeeeed to be protected) --  but right there on NBC, ABC, CBS, HBO, Hollywood movies -- in your face, a part of goings-on that pass for culture nowadays. Some folks would just say, "well, change the channel!" -- but  you can't switch the channel on the culture you live in. You can't "turn it off." It's like the air we breathe; it's just there, ever-present, present everywhere. Our kids are raised in it, soaking it all up like little sponges. They're drenched in anti-Christianism, scientism, materialism, sexual liberation, hatred of masculinity, ideas of gay "marriage," the rights of women to kill their babies, egalitarianism, and all the other unreasonable, diabolical idealogies that are destroying Christendom and civilization itself. Our ability to pass down our (real) culture to our own children has been taken away from us.  Aside from the concept of "pro-creating more souls for God," the psychological reasons for having kids are gone -- i.e., our desire to raise the next generation to learn from us and do better than us, to make the world more livable and beautiful, to spread love, to spread the Gospel, to live long and happy, meaningful lives and to remember us with fondness rather than as unenlightened "bigots" for whom they should apologize for not being as "illuminated" as the racist race-baiting, Christ-hating, baby-killing, misandrist idiots who pose as our moral superiors. And there's nowhere to go to get away from it..

Isn't that a lovely thought?
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#6
I don't see what the problem is. Huh?
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#7
(08-21-2013, 04:04 PM)dymphnaw Wrote: I don't see what the problem is. Huh?
Disparate treatment is the problem. Respect shown for any religion but a Christian one. If it were us building eruvim, not only would there not be a Google map for it, but they'd be laffing at us about it all the time on the Tonight Show.
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#8
(08-23-2013, 05:31 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote:
(08-21-2013, 04:04 PM)dymphnaw Wrote: I don't see what the problem is. Huh?
Disparate treatment is the problem. Respect shown for any religion but a Christian one. If it were us building eruvim, not only would there not be a Google map for it, but they'd be laffing at us about it all the time on the Tonight Show.

And people writing to their parish with a form downloaded from the internet requesting their address be removed from the "Cathuv" as they want no association with the evil's of Catholicism.

Really fascinating thread I had no clue about and astonishing the lengths people go to obey the letter and ignore the Word. Counter-intuitively it seems this kind of legalism is the refuge of liberal liturgists who think as long as they do the minimum required they can add or subtract anything else they want at will. I suppose extending the limits of the sanctuary to anywhere they fancy is like putting wire around the boundary of their own all inclusive love table.
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