Ideological-Theological Spectrum of Self-Identified Catholics
#51
(08-16-2013, 11:00 AM)JayneK Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 10:49 AM)Melchior Wrote: 2)  Apparently the charismatic renewal is liberal, despite the hundreds of charismatics I know *plus* the Society of Apostolic Life I know being very orthodox.

You and I live relatively close to each other.  I wonder if this preponderance of orthodox charismatics that we have experienced is a local phenomenon.  Maybe, in other places, many of the them are liberal.

mmm, you could even call it a 'toronto blessing,' eh?  :eyeroll:
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#52
(08-16-2013, 11:47 AM)guacamole Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 11:00 AM)JayneK Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 10:49 AM)Melchior Wrote: 2)  Apparently the charismatic renewal is liberal, despite the hundreds of charismatics I know *plus* the Society of Apostolic Life I know being very orthodox.

You and I live relatively close to each other.  I wonder if this preponderance of orthodox charismatics that we have experienced is a local phenomenon.  Maybe, in other places, many of the them are liberal.

mmm, you could even call it a 'toronto blessing,' eh?   :eyeroll:

While Melchior and I live relatively close to each other, I do not think that he is close enough to Toronto to appreciate that.  Basically there are two kinds of Canadians, those who live in Toronto and those who resent Toronto.  :)
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#53
I don't know where I fall on the spectrum. I  can hardly stand the EWTN/Catholic Answers version of Catholicism. They have taken control of the mentality of this country's many Catholics. There's got to be another option.

I'd say I'm progressive but there are items on that list that don't compute for me. I seriously don't know.

I also agree with Melchoir that the charismatics I know are very orthodox minded, they love Mary, wear the scapular, home school, and are highly moral people. That's liberal?
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#54
(08-16-2013, 12:38 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I don't know where I fall on the spectrum. I  can hardly stand the EWTN/Catholic Answers version of Catholicism. They have taken control of the mentality of this country's many Catholics. There's got to be another option.

I'd say I'm progressive but there are items on that list that don't compute for me. I seriously don't know.

I also agree with Melchoir that the charismatics I know are very orthodox minded, they love Mary, wear the scapular, home school, and are highly moral people. That's liberal?

I think each line represents different things. For example, the charismatic line references liturgical ideology. One line representes political ideology. Another, church/state ideology. Another, ecumenism. Another, Council perspective. etc.
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#55
(08-16-2013, 12:38 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I don't know where I fall on the spectrum.

well, whatever you are, you're strict.  we know that.
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#56
Charismaticism is liberal in the sense that it's a novelty that didn't exist before the Council. I would think that there are otherwise plenty of orthodox-minded charismatics, but that doesn't make charismaticism itself Catholic in nature.
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#57
(08-16-2013, 12:47 PM)guacamole Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 12:38 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I don't know where I fall on the spectrum.

well, whatever you are, you're strict.  we know that.

Well, I'm strict about what really matters lol
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#58
(08-16-2013, 12:44 PM)Tenmaru Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 12:38 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I don't know where I fall on the spectrum. I  can hardly stand the EWTN/Catholic Answers version of Catholicism. They have taken control of the mentality of this country's many Catholics. There's got to be another option.

I'd say I'm progressive but there are items on that list that don't compute for me. I seriously don't know.

I also agree with Melchoir that the charismatics I know are very orthodox minded, they love Mary, wear the scapular, home school, and are highly moral people. That's liberal?

I think each line represents different things. For example, the charismatic line references liturgical ideology. One line representes political ideology. Another, church/state ideology. Another, ecumenism. Another, Council perspective. etc.

That makes sense.  The charismatics I've known could be called liturgically liberal.  However, when I think of liberal, I think primarily in terms of doctrine.  As far as doctrine goes, most charismatics in my experience have been sound.
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#59
(08-16-2013, 12:54 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 12:44 PM)Tenmaru Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 12:38 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: I don't know where I fall on the spectrum. I  can hardly stand the EWTN/Catholic Answers version of Catholicism. They have taken control of the mentality of this country's many Catholics. There's got to be another option.

I'd say I'm progressive but there are items on that list that don't compute for me. I seriously don't know.

I also agree with Melchoir that the charismatics I know are very orthodox minded, they love Mary, wear the scapular, home school, and are highly moral people. That's liberal?

I think each line represents different things. For example, the charismatic line references liturgical ideology. One line representes political ideology. Another, church/state ideology. Another, ecumenism. Another, Council perspective. etc.

That makes sense.  The charismatics I've known could be called liturgically liberal.  However, when I think of liberal, I think primarily in terms of doctrine.  As far as doctrine goes, most charismatics in my experience have been sound.

Then there's no reason, really, for traditionalists to not become charismatics, right?
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#60
(08-16-2013, 12:48 PM)Meg Wrote: Charismaticism is liberal in the sense that it's a novelty that didn't exist before the Council. I would think that there are otherwise plenty of orthodox-minded charismatics That doesn't make charismaticism itself Catholic in nature.

Before St. Francis mendicant orders did not exist.  Does that mean they are not really Catholic?  Did they become Catholic after they had been around for long enough to not be considered a novelty?

By the way, this novelty of mendicants was a major factor in St. Thomas Aquinas's parents opposing him becoming a Dominican.  Would you say they were correct to do so?
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