No servile labor on Holy Days of Obligation?
#1
I just saw where apparently this is a canon, and I suppose it makes sense in the light of the Commandment. (I read this on Shameless Popery).
Quote:2. You Should Avoid “Servile Work” Today: Most Catholics know that they’re not supposed to work unnecessarily on Sundays and major holidays. We don’t really need to be told that going to work on Christmas isn’t what we’re called to as Christians. Working on Christmas feels wrong.

But many Catholics are unaware that the Church calls on us to avoid “servile labor” on all Holy Days of Obligation (including today) in the same way that we would on Sundays. This comes from the first of the five precepts of the Church (which are listed in the Catechism in CCC 2042-43): “You shall attend Mass on Sundays and holy days of obligation and rest from servile labor.” CCC 2042 explains that this precept:

... requires the faithful to sanctify the day commemorating the Resurrection of the Lord as well as the principal liturgical feasts honoring the Mysteries of the Lord, the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the saints; in the first place, by participating in the Eucharistic celebration, in which the Christian community is gathered, and by resting from those works and activities which could impede such a sanctification of these days.

The five precepts of the Church (which are binding on all Catholics) are “meant to guarantee to the faithful the very necessary minimum in the spirit of prayer and moral effort, in the growth in love of God and neighbor” (CCC 2041). Giving a few days out of the year – Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation – is part of the bare minimum that you should be doing as a Catholic.

I really never knew that. How many of you take a vacation on Holy Days, assuming the fact that you have dispensable vacation days at work?

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#2
Once I am able to, I will pretty much build my holiday plans around feast days. For now, I work through an agency and can't really get time off. So yup, I worked yesterday.
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#3
A lot of jobs or professions wouldn't fall under the category of "servile labor," though... I always thought that you were allowed to do whatever your job required of you, but that you shouldn't engage in prolonged, unnecessary physical work (like painting the house, mowing 5 acres of lawn, or scrubbing and polishing your entire floor). Maybe I should look it up in Moral Theology.  :Hmm:
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#4
The word means slavishly. I remember when we had Holy Days of Obligation during a work week, we were allowed to work our jobs. Of course in those days "sick days" hadn't been invented yet. If a father or even a young man didn't work on that day it would cause real problems in the family for groceries or the rent. Today with most Holy Days moved to Sundays giving up work on the Holy Day would be virtuous, unless you need the do-re-mi.In the affluent 50's any son or daughter old enough had a job and contibuted to the family. Jackie Gleason in the honeymooners with the john in the hall was more indicative than Happy Days of the 50's.

tim
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#5
(08-16-2013, 05:03 PM)Deidre Wrote: A lot of jobs or professions wouldn't fall under the category of "servile labor,"

The 1983 code removed the word "servile".
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#6
Ive heard arguments over this in my trad parish, the men shoot their mouth off that woman shouldn't shop on Sunday because it forces others to work on that day. Now the woman are shooting back that the men cant watch football or baseball on sunday because it forces those at the stadium to work on Sunday. This is one of the things that happens when a Catholic country becomes a secular one.
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#7
(08-16-2013, 06:17 PM)devoutchristian Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 05:03 PM)Deidre Wrote: A lot of jobs or professions wouldn't fall under the category of "servile labor,"

The 1983 code removed the word "servile".

Well that's confusing!  ??? So, no writing papers, doing homework, translating, sewing....?? Seriously, where does one draw the line, if the distinction isn't maintained?  :shrug:
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#8
You were always allowed to read, write or study. The problem there is today "work" is reading, writing, study. Not too much manual labor anymore.

tim
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#9
(08-16-2013, 06:49 PM)salus Wrote: Ive heard arguments over this in my trad parish, the men shoot their mouth off that woman shouldn't shop on Sunday because it forces others to work on that day. Now the woman are shooting back that the men cant watch football or baseball on sunday because it forces those at the stadium to work on Sunday. This is one of the things that happens when a Catholic country becomes a secular one.

Hmmm. The Catechism's section on the third commandment allows people to work for sports, restaurants, and public necessities on Sunday, although it doesn't explain the reasoning behind the former two.

(08-16-2013, 06:56 PM)Deidre Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 06:17 PM)devoutchristian Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 05:03 PM)Deidre Wrote: A lot of jobs or professions wouldn't fall under the category of "servile labor,"

The 1983 code removed the word "servile".

Well that's confusing!  ??? So, no writing papers, doing homework, translating, sewing....?? Seriously, where does one draw the line, if the distinction isn't maintained?  :shrug:

I think the idea is to make it so that people decide for themselves what is unnecessary and what constitutes work. I agree that it's problematic since it leads to scrupulous people trying to abstain from everything and lax people abstaining from nothing.
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#10
(08-16-2013, 06:56 PM)Deidre Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 06:17 PM)devoutchristian Wrote:
(08-16-2013, 05:03 PM)Deidre Wrote: A lot of jobs or professions wouldn't fall under the category of "servile labor,"

The 1983 code removed the word "servile".

Well that's confusing!  ??? So, no writing papers, doing homework, translating, sewing....?? Seriously, where does one draw the line, if the distinction isn't maintained?  :shrug:

I always sort of laughed at that one. As the Mom of 4 kids under the age of 7, it didn't work out very well. On Sundays, I would start on Sat. night, polishing those horrible white high top shoes that the doctors said were a must & washing the shoe strings. Then came the baths, hair washing & many cries of, "don't get soap in my eyes".

The next morning I got all of them up & fed & it LOOKED as if they needed another bath. I just gave them a
"wash up", combed everyone's hair & started on dressing everyone. By the time I got the last one all ready, the first one's shirttail was hanging out & hair all messed up.

Finally, my husband finished the chores with the livestock, came in to clean up & the children were sat down on the couch to watch TV. & firmly admonished about what would happen if they moved.

Then, all 6 of us piled into the car & were off to Mass. We Walked into Church & everything changed. There was a "hush feeling" when one entered those solemn old Churches.....even the small children were aware of the fact that this was God's house. One hour of silence,  peace & prayer did wonders for all of us.

Then it was home to fix dinner for my family & my parents & siblings. They  usually came for dinner on Sundays about 1PM.  If a Mother ever figures out a way to avoid servile labor on Sunday........it's too late for me, but write a book about it for young Mothers. You'll make a fortune.
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