Importance of human warmth and normality
#31
(09-19-2013, 03:31 AM)newtolatin Wrote: Guacamole,
I must THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!! for posting this!!!!!!!

Newtolatin, I am very glad for you!  Sometimes the best way forward is to take a step back.  These insights into the importance of a healthy, normal emotional life are so, so important. 
Quote:The glory of God is man fully alive.

St. Irenaeus.

I think you might also appreciate the writings of Catholic psychologist Conrad Baars, who is discussed in this thread.  He, like Fr. Seraphim Rose, emphasized the importance of beautiful, good art and music for the cultivation of a healthy emotional life.
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#32
(09-19-2013, 01:45 AM)Basilios Wrote: LOL screw the world. I tell me best friend I love him all the time (srs). We're like brothers. Some people admittedly did question if we were boyfriends. Kinda weird, we're both quite manly, but I guess it's because we used to be together a lot and had a ton of in-jokes. I miss him, but we chat at least once a week and play video games online together. We were also quite affectionate. It's a word that has bad connotations so I don't mean that we were rubbing each others backs. But we were best friends, brothers even, and even shared a spiritual bond (though he's a proddy) so there was never any kind of 'zomg we're gay'. If you read letters between male friends from even 100 years ago they'd shock the modern man who has funny ideas about manliness and friendship. Which is why people now postulate that St David and Jonathan were homosexual.

Kudos to you, Basilios.  Excellent post.  You are blessed.

You will understand this beautiful sermon from St. Gregory Nazianzen, which is given in the Office of Readings for January 2nd:
[quote]Basil and I were both in Athens. We had come, like streams of a river, from the same source in our native land, had separated from each other in pursuit of learning, and were now united again as if by plan, for God so arranged it.

I was not alone at that time in my regard for my friend, the great Basil. I knew his irreproachable conduct, and the maturity and wisdom of his conversation. I sought to persuade others, to whom he was less well known, to have the same regard for him. Many fell immediately under his spell, for they had already heard of him by reputation and hearsay.

What was the outcome? Almost alone of those who had come to Athens to study he was exempted from the customary ceremonies of initiation for he was held in higher honor that his status as a first-year student seemed to warrant.

Such was the prelude to our friendship, the kindling of that flame that was to bind us together. In this way we began to feel affection for each other. When, in the course of time, we acknowledged our friendship and recognized that our ambition was a life of true wisdom, we became everything to each other: we shared the same lodging, the same table, the same desires, the same goal. Our love for each other grew daily warmer and deeper.

The same hope inspired us: the pursuit of learning. This is an ambition especially subject to envy. Yet between us there was no envy. On the contrary, we made capital out of our rivalry. Our rivalry consisted, not in seeking the first place for oneself but in yielding it to the other, for we each looked on the other’s success as his own.

We seemed to be two bodies with a single spirit. Though we cannot believe those who claim that “everything is contained in everything,” yet you must believe that in our case each of us was in the other and with the other.

Our single object and ambition was virtue, and a life of hope in the blessings that are to come; we wanted to withdraw from this world before we departed from it. With this end in view we ordered our lives and all our actions. We followed the guidance of God’s law and spurred each other on to virtue. If it is not too boastful to say, we found in each other a standard and rule for discerning right from wrong.

Different men have different names, which they owe to their parents or to themselves, that is, to their own pursuits and achievements. But our great pursuit, the great name we wanted, was to be Christians, to be called Christians.
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#33
(09-18-2013, 04:46 PM)IVSTINIVS Wrote:
(09-18-2013, 04:31 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(09-18-2013, 10:39 AM)drummerboy Wrote: This priest is right.  If Oliver Twist doesn't tug at your heart you are quite cold and inhuman - the ultimate meat popsicle.  messing with
I am also not enthusiastic about people going on about warmth and normality.  In my experience, this is often used by extraverts who try to make it seem like there is something wrong with being an introvert.

I prefer to present a reserved and logical persona to the world and keep my emotions for those closest to me.  I am just fine like that and do not need fixing.

Totally agreed. I am introverted and at lot of the times my reserved ways are made out to be "wrong," "bad," or even "uncharitable." The truth is, neither introversion or extroversion nor outward displays of warmth and cheer "vs" calm, cool, and collected is right or wrong. Unlike a lot of this, there is relativity on them matter. Both are good as long as neither are taken to the extreme. Just look at the personality types. Who's a choleric to say that a melancholic is taking the wrong tack in life?

My own person tells me that "presenting a reserved and logical persona to the world and keeping my emotions for those closest to me," is actually the "correct" way. But I realize the Church, and the world, is a big place and that my ways are not superior. There's room for us all.

There's St. Bruno. And then there's St. Thomas More. They're not opposed.

Hey people, you're talking to the king of cool here, I mean, the king of introversion - what else do you say about someone who dislikes hugs even from his mum.  I'm not a warm snuggly person and that's not what I meant in my post.  If you've read Oliver Twist, you'd know what I'm talking about.  Even an introvert should be able to sympathize (and I don't mean sit down and cry with them; I'm very stoic in this regards as well) with an orphan boy taken advantage of by brutish criminals and the like.  If not, I don't see how the love of Christ can be in you. 
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#34
(09-19-2013, 11:47 AM)drummerboy Wrote:   Even an introvert should be able to sympathize (and I don't mean sit down and cry with them; I'm very stoic in this regards as well) with an orphan boy taken advantage of by brutish criminals and the like.  If not, I don't see how the love of Christ can be in you. 

I have plenty of sympathy for real orphans who are taken advantage of.  Oliver Twist is a work of fiction.
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#35
(09-19-2013, 03:30 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(09-19-2013, 11:47 AM)drummerboy Wrote:   Even an introvert should be able to sympathize (and I don't mean sit down and cry with them; I'm very stoic in this regards as well) with an orphan boy taken advantage of by brutish criminals and the like.  If not, I don't see how the love of Christ can be in you. 

I have plenty of sympathy for real orphans who are taken advantage of.  Oliver Twist is a work of fiction.

Just to be clear, I sympathize with all orphans, whether real or fictional.
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#36
(09-19-2013, 03:30 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(09-19-2013, 11:47 AM)drummerboy Wrote:   Even an introvert should be able to sympathize (and I don't mean sit down and cry with them; I'm very stoic in this regards as well) with an orphan boy taken advantage of by brutish criminals and the like.  If not, I don't see how the love of Christ can be in you. 

I have plenty of sympathy for real orphans who are taken advantage of.  Oliver Twist is a work of fiction.

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