Glosses Reveal a Gnostic Luther
#1
This article discusses the work of German priest Theobald Beer in compiling Luther's handwritten commentary notes found in the margins of his books by St. Augustine, Peter Lombard, and others, and the implications it has for Luther's theology.
Quote:Glosses Reveal a Gnostic Luther

For most of post-Reformation history, it has been axiomatic in theological histories of the controversy to propose Martin Luther as a devoted follower of the theology St. Augustine of Hippo, the great opponent of the Manichees. This is not surprising, given that Augustine is often invoked by the Reformers against Catholic dogma, that heretics such as Calvin and Cornelius Jansen have made a corrupted Augustinianism the center of their doctrines, that Augustine's bold stance in favor of grace against the Pelagians lent itself to a certain degree of use by Reformers arguing in favor of sola fide and double-predestination, and that Luther himself was an Augustinian monk. Contemporary scholarship, however, reveals quite a contrary picture of Luther. Far from invoking Augustine against Rome, Martin Luther shows himself disdainful of the great doctor of Hippo, and in fact an advocate of the dualist theology of the Manichees.
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Full article here:
http://www.unamsanctamcatholicam.com/his...uther.html
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#2
I still got to finish reading The Facts About Luther by Msgr. Patrick F O'Hare.

Apparently it's the most accurate and objective portrayal of one of the greatest and most powerful heretics in Church History.



Amazing the Church still hasn't tackled this heresy yet...how long did the Arian heresy last?
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#3
(09-26-2013, 10:22 PM)austenbosten Wrote: I still got to finish reading The Facts About Luther by Msgr. Patrick F O'Hare.

Apparently it's the most accurate and objective portrayal of one of the greatest and most powerful heretics in Church History.



Amazing the Church still hasn't tackled this heresy yet...how long did the Arian heresy last?

I just looked it up on Amazon...sounds very interesting! That was a wake-up call for me as a protestant, when I actually read Luther's own words. For a class I had to read a couple of letters exchanged between Luther and Erasmus, and I thought "wait a minute, I'm supposed to agree with this guy??"

I agree, it would be lovely if the Church's "dialogue" could include some basic apologetics. A big wake-up call for me as a newbie Catholic was reading a critique of the penal substitution theory of the atonement featured on the Unam Sanctam Catholic blog (the precursor of the website I just linked to.) Afterwards I thought "Whoa, I really do belong to a different religion now."  :LOL:
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#4
(09-26-2013, 10:22 PM)austenbosten Wrote: I still got to finish reading The Facts About Luther by Msgr. Patrick F O'Hare.

Apparently it's the most accurate and objective portrayal of one of the greatest and most powerful heretics in Church History.



Amazing the Church still hasn't tackled this heresy yet...how long did the Arian heresy last?

Well that is not quite accurate for all intents and purposes Luther's Lutheranism has been dead for a while now some would even say that it died as soon as he did, because his number 2 (Melanchthon) changed quite a few things not long after the pig was dead. However as with any heresy it tends to mutate in to new forms and infections.

The current protestant strain so called "evangelicalism" is more or less a mish mash of all the heretical doctrines put in to one easy to appeal to anybody package.
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#5
Wow, I just read about a 1/4 of that article on Luther, I want to throw up.

His theological thoughts are right down disturbing. Its amazing how he manipulates and twists thought in to a pretzel until he makes it fit.
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