The Saddest Spectacle in Racing
#1
I am heartsick. Screenshots of the Andretti luck in action:
 
 
 
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#2
Hmm. Makes you wonder why always the same guys win it.[Image: hmmm.gif]
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#3
Huh??
Whats this about? Sorry for the aussie ignorance.
 
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#4
Remember, friends—car-racing and boxing are mortal sins, as defined by Pius XII. Just trying to help!Fo' Shame
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#5
Why would car racing be a mortal sin?
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#6
RoyalRebel Wrote:Remember, friends—car-racing and boxing are mortal sins, as defined by Pius XII. Just trying to help!Fo' Shame

Please provide a source that backs up your statement.
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#7
I knew it.
 
He's no rebel...only a damn Yankee would consider car racing a sin.
 
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#8
As chaplain of our local chapter of Sons of Confederate Veterans (in which capacity I pray nothing but Catholic prayers), I gave a speech last year in which I decried such plebby activities as a waste of time. Such redneckery only enforces negative stereotypes about the South, I argued, and we should have better things to do, in est, reading about our glorious history, for one thing. It’s also a needless waste of petrol, thus playing into the hands of the filthy Mohammedans who control the oil industry.
As my esteemed friend, Royal Cello, pointed out on this forum not long ago, the papal objections to such “sports” stem from the needless endangerment of one’s life. I believe Pius XII condemned them in an encyclical in the 1950’s; my right honourable friend Pagliaccio, who is entirely more learned in papal encyclicals than I, could say for certain. Suffice to say, I know it exists.
And HE, Bishop Richard Williamson points out the dangers of being seduced by organised “professional” sports (ie, being paid too, too much) in the current Angelus. HE confirmed both my wife and me, and he always makes cogent points. Localised, family-level sport is one thing and can be quite laudatory, he argues, but professional sport can be diabolical.
As our own very dear SSPX priest would say, “Bee-eee careful!”Hi!
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#9
And by the way, my Scottish ancestors arrived in the Cape Fear in 1702. With my family having been here more than three centuries and a great-great-grandfather with Lee at Appomattox, I’m about as Southern as they come. So don’t call me a Yankee!Confusedmile:
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#10
It's one thing to say that Catholics shouldn't probably support them because they're over-commercialized, detrimental to family life, "modern world" hype, etc. That I might agree with. (emphasize "might," I think it depends on many factors.) However, saying that it's mortal sin because of "reckless endangerment of life" is quite different, in that automobile racing is no more dangerous than pretty much any other sport these days. In the 1950s, when Pius wrote his encyclical, medical care was not what it is today. Furthermore, auto safety belts were not created for car racing until 1952 I believe. This is potentially before Pius wrote his encyclical, and the safety belt, not to mention modern rollbars, cages, harness restraints, bucket seats, padded dashes, safety steering wheels, and air-bag systems increase safety phenomenally. Nearly all of the problems which were enumerated in Ralph Nader's famous early 1960s book "Unsafe at any speed" have been rectified in the modern automobile, and these modern safety features are present threefold in a racing environment. If it's "excessively dangerous to your health," certainly dangerous enough to be considered a mortal sin, then so is horse racing, (potentially much more dangerous, btw) and pretty much every other sport as well. Perhaps we shouldn't have friendly family-friends-parish-neighborhood games of baseball, because somebody could potentially get thwacked in the head or other regions by a nicely hit ball or a bat that flies out of the batter's hand? I agree that some sports and such are needlessly endangering life, but there has to be a limit. Otherwise we'll all end up in a cave with our rosary, and even THAT could be argued as "dangerous" because we might fall down a bottomless pit or something.
 
 
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