Seasoning a cast iron skillet
#11
(10-13-2013, 09:03 PM)christulsa123 Wrote: Pardon my ignorance, but what is the purpose of "seasoning" a skillet?  Why is it called "seasoning?"  Just for cast iron?


Good question, I have always wondered about the same.

Also, are these types of pans safe? Do they release any of the material they are made with, when you cook in them? And, can you bake in them? Thanks.
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#12
Depending on the degree to which they are coated (seasoned) they may release a minuscule amount of iron which is not harmful unlike Teflon non-stick pans which can release toxins.

Cast iron has excellent heat distributing properties so it is very good both on the burner and in the oven.  The only "baking" I've done with cast iron is cornbread but I have some outdoor cookbooks that include cakes and breads that can be made in a Dutch Oven.
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#13
Iron cookware is king.

Fry bacon in it.  Drain the fat in to your bacon grease can, for when you make your french fries or bean soup.  Then, take that pan, wash it off.  Dry your skillet by placing it on your stove, and cooking off the water.  Then, take a cooking oil-soaked paper towel, and rub the iron champion until it's covered in a beautiful sheen.  Store.


- - -

Yesterday I cooked bread rolls outside, along with hotlinks.  I baked the bread in my 14 inch dutch oven.  It required 26 charcoal briquettes on top, and 14 underneath for about 45 minutes.  They were baked to a beautiful golden brown and basted in butter. 
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#14
(10-13-2013, 09:36 PM)DeoGratias72 Wrote: Also, are these types of pans safe?

Yes.
Quote:Do they release any of the material they are made with, when you cook in them?

Yes. They release trace amounts of iron, a necessary nutrient, tho' I've been told by a doctor that the molecules are too large to be utilised by the body.
Quote:And, can you bake in them?

Yes. In the oven or in a bed of coals in a camp fire.
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#15
Learn to use them, we'll need to be able to do it shortly. You'll also need the very best carbon steel knives for cooking and butchering, along with diamond impregnated files for sharpening.

tim
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#16
"Seasoning" the pan makes the food taste better?  ???
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#17
(10-15-2013, 09:52 PM)christulsa123 Wrote: "Seasoning" the pan makes the food taste better?   ???

Not necessarily, but it cooks better, doesn't stick, and makes the pan much easier to clean! :)
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#18
(10-15-2013, 10:30 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(10-15-2013, 09:52 PM)christulsa123 Wrote: "Seasoning" the pan makes the food taste better?   ???

Not necessarily, but it cooks better, doesn't stick, and makes the pan much easier to clean! :)

Aw, gotcha. I always wondered what it was.

We've got a large cast iron skillet and a cast iron Dutch oven. I think I will "season" them!
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#19
It's that tiny bit of leftover grease on the pan that makes all the difference. It's that little slip that makes the next meal cook just right.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#20
You can do the same with hard coat anodized professional pans. I have both. My sister that lives down stairs is always amazed I can fry breaded meat with Italian grated cheese in the crumbs, wash it and they fry 3 eggs over with no stick. This also the reason you should change the oil in your car frequently.

Oil + Heat = seasoned, even pistons.

tim
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