5 foods you should splurge on at the supermarket
#1
http://mytechnologyworld9.blogspot.in/20...on-at.html

5 foods you should splurge on at the supermarket

1. Chicken
When picking up chicken, buying organic makes a difference. Not only are you avoiding consuming antibiotics (gross), but the flavor is far superior. “That old saying ‘it tastes like chicken’ means is tastes like nothing,” says former Bon Appetit Deputy Food Editor Janet McCracken. “This tastes like chicken should taste.”

2. Olive oil
Put some money towards the primo stuff for finishing dishes–not for cooking them. There are so many good ones on the market, but one national brand that we like that’s not even that expensive is Columela. It’s important to keep in mind that olive oils can range from tasting buttery and mild to being pungent and peppery, and the only way to know what you prefer is to taste them. So, cook with a cheaper oil that’s mild and finish–meaning drizzle it on meat or pasta once they’re plated, or on a salad–with the more expensive oil. Whether it’s buttery or peppery is up to you.

3. Butter
We’re getting into heavy baking season, and you want to really taste the butter in those cookies. If you fork over some extra dough for the good stuff–Kerrygold and Plugra are two European brands that are fairly ubiquitous in the States now–you’ll be sure to taste butter “instead of just ‘some fat’ in the background,” says McCracken.

4. Eggs
Buy organic, and you’ll see that vibrant gold yolk instead of a pale yellow. You’ll also taste the richness of it. You’ll taste the difference between the yolk and the white, too, instead of just eating “egg” flavor. Seriously, the difference is huge. Cook an organic (preferably farm fresh) egg next to a non-organic one and prepare to have your mind blown.

5. Olives
If your market has an olive bar, check it out. If not, look for oil-cured olives or olives in brine, not the canned stuff packed in water.
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#2
Do olives in my martini count?  :)
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#3
Here's an article on the different olives.

http://www.foodsubs.com/Olivpick.html

My favorite is a little one from Liguria. My local green grocer gets them dried and wrinkled. He puts them in olive oil and rosemary which is typical for these olives.

My second favorite is one from Sicily. They are green and way more tasty than manzanillas. They make a salad with them. Smash the olive with one blow with a shot glass with the heavy bottom. You want to crack them and expose but not remove the pit. Toss in container. Cut celery into bit sized pieces and toss in container.

Do the same with onions. Add peperoncini and some olive oil. The peperoncini are a mild pepper. Get the Italian ones not the greek. The greeks are tough and never become soft. You can take the salad up a notch and add stuff like roasted red peppers or hot peppers, it's up to you.

Both need to rest for a few days to mingle the flavors.

The Sicilian olives can be bought pitted. These are perfect for the holidays. I stuff them. Take a pkg. of Philly cream cheese and bring to room temperature. Do the same with a good piece of Gorgonzola, about a half pound more or less depending on your palate.

Mix the two well, use half and half to help smooth the mixture but keep it pipeable. Pipe the mixture into the olives, chill and serve.

All of these olives and more are paired well with Italian cold cuts. Sort of a real antipasto without lettuce.

tim
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#4
(10-18-2013, 09:00 AM)Zedta Wrote: http://mytechnologyworld9.blogspot.in/20...on-at.html

5 foods you should splurge on at the supermarket

1. Chicken
When picking up chicken, buying organic makes a difference. Not only are you avoiding consuming antibiotics (gross), but the flavor is far superior. “That old saying ‘it tastes like chicken’ means is tastes like nothing,” says former Bon Appetit Deputy Food Editor Janet McCracken. “This tastes like chicken should taste.”

2. Olive oil
Put some money towards the primo stuff for finishing dishes–not for cooking them. There are so many good ones on the market, but one national brand that we like that’s not even that expensive is Columela. It’s important to keep in mind that olive oils can range from tasting buttery and mild to being pungent and peppery, and the only way to know what you prefer is to taste them. So, cook with a cheaper oil that’s mild and finish–meaning drizzle it on meat or pasta once they’re plated, or on a salad–with the more expensive oil. Whether it’s buttery or peppery is up to you.

3. Butter
We’re getting into heavy baking season, and you want to really taste the butter in those cookies. If you fork over some extra dough for the good stuff–Kerrygold and Plugra are two European brands that are fairly ubiquitous in the States now–you’ll be sure to taste butter “instead of just ‘some fat’ in the background,” says McCracken.

4. Eggs
Buy organic, and you’ll see that vibrant gold yolk instead of a pale yellow. You’ll also taste the richness of it. You’ll taste the difference between the yolk and the white, too, instead of just eating “egg” flavor. Seriously, the difference is huge. Cook an organic (preferably farm fresh) egg next to a non-organic one and prepare to have your mind blown.

5. Olives
If your market has an olive bar, check it out. If not, look for oil-cured olives or olives in brine, not the canned stuff packed in water.

We have a CSA that we get pastured chickens and eggs from. On the odd occasion we have to buy eggs from the store, my daughter always insists we get brown eggs instead of white ones. "Because the brown ones taste better, "according to her.

Then it dawned on me because the pastured-raised eggs from the farm are always brown (and sometimes we luck out and get a blue one - very cool!), and yes, they absolutely taste better. Even a 5-year-old can tell!

That, and bone broth made with store-bought chickens rarely gel for me, but the ones made from the good farm chickens generally always do!
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