Chocolate Flavored Fisheaters?
#1
Are there any other chocolate flavored fisheaters on the site, or am I the only one (okay, so I'm multiracial, but I still count, at least partially [Image: smile.gif])?
 
Does anyone have a large black trad community at their chapel, besides me (we have quite a lot; we're all from the Caribbean)? Do you interact and relate really well to the chocolate flavored trads at your chapels?
 
Just a question; I've always been curious...
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#2
i know I'm not supposed to post in this thread but....


My indult has at least 3 or 4 Black people at mass.

a question for you:

are there a lot of Trads in the Caribbean?




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#3
My Traditional Priest is Nigerian.
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#4
My godfather is black. He's about the only black man in the parish and he's married to a white woman so he really stands out but I love him. He's kind of a neo-con but his wife is a solid trad and is working on him. He's very active in the parish, has his hand in just about everything and is now president of the local CuF chapter among other things. There is one black woman I see at mass, older lady. I don't know her but I see her every Sunday faithfully and sometimes during the week at mass.



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#5
Extraecclesiamnullasalus Wrote:i know I'm not supposed to post in this thread but....
Why not post it? It was actually kinda what I asked you...[Image: tongue.gif]

My ind ult has at least 3 or 4 Black people at mass.

a question for you:

are there a lot of Trads in the Caribbean?

 
There actually seem to be quite a lot of trads in the Caribbean and Latin and South America; I noticed that when I was at the NO at my all-Creole mass, sermons were always extremely conservative -- like stuff no one would ever say at any English-speaking NO mass (about homosexuality, feminism, Protestants, crime and personal responsibility,etc); the responses from the parishioners were always favorable, even grateful, at times. 
 
It looks like there's a different ethos or a trad sensibility in our parts of the world.  When you think about it, it actually makes more sense that people would be trads in those parts of the world, since Catholicism is so integral to the culture of those places (like Haiti, were my parents are from) it would be incredibly difficult for a Protestant sensibility, like the NO (emphasis on radical individualism, moral relativism, personal experience of religion in contrast to communal or sacramental, etc) to have converts/adherents in our culture(s) -- people either stay trad in their sensibility, or leave NOism altogether, because it's unrecognizable...
 
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#6
Footnote:
 
I forgot to add that my chapel is actually the most diverse Catholic Church I've ever attended (which I suppose shatters  NO peoples' ideas about the "traditional Catholic movement"). Economically, socially, ethnically, and racially, geographically, it's incredibly diverse for such a small community...
 
I've heard a lot of the parishioners say it's the most inspiring thing about the community -- that regardless of these differences, people are making incredible sacrifices in their devotion and unity in Catholicism.  
 
It actually really is interesting to see: how people pray differently and in different languages before and after the masses, the regional devotions and dress -- but that all stops as soon as the mass begins.  And even people who are supposedly the most ignorant and uneducated are able to follow, and when necessary, respond in Latin...
 
So, why are people in the NO making these groundless claims about "active participation," and how alienating and inaccessible the TLM is supposed to be?
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#7
Immaculata001 Wrote:

Extraecclesiamnullasalus Wrote:i know I'm not supposed to post in this thread but....
Why not post it? It was actually kinda what I asked you...[Image: tongue.gif]

My ind ult has at least 3 or 4 Black people at mass.

a question for you:

are there a lot of Trads in the Caribbean?

There actually seem to be quite a lot of trads in the Caribbean and Latin and South America; I noticed that when I was at the NO at my all-Creole mass, sermons were always extremely conservative -- like stuff no one would ever say at any English-speaking NO mass (about homosexuality, feminism, Protestants, crime and personal responsibility,etc); the responses from the parishioners were always favorable, even grateful, at times.


It looks like there's a different ethos or a trad sensibility in our parts of the world. When you think about it, it actually makes more sense that people would be trads in those parts of the world, since Catholicism is so integral to the culture of those places (like Haiti, were my parents are from) it would be incredibly difficult for a Protestant sensibility, like the NO (emphasis on radical individualism, moral relativism, personal experience of religion in contrast to communal or sacramental, etc) to have converts/adherents in our culture(s) -- people either stay trad in their sensibility, or leave NOism altogether, because it's unrecognizable...

Doesn't Haiti have a big problem with Voodoism? does this effect Catholicism there?
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#8
I'm about half-Indonesian. Not chocolate, but I would call it "brown sugar". Then I'm half-Anglo, so I come out looking yellow.
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#9
Quote:Doesn't Haiti have a big problem with Voodoism? does this effect Catholicism there?
 
 
Sorry for not responding, EENS, but I just got back to town -- I'm feeling pretty poorly and am leaving again, so I'll respond, briefly...
 
Paganism has always been a rival "tradition" in Non-European Catholic nations.  IMHO, I think this is because missionary efforts were not effective in making the best appeal to converts, largely from some alienation of European Catholics, due to racial ideology.  It seems that the best successes of massive conversion (i.e: Saint Patrick, in Ireland; Our Lady of Guadalupe, in Mexico) had a thorough understanding of peoples' culture, and could use a peaceful means of drawing some transcendent parallels between indigenous peoples and Catholicism.
 
Missionaries in Africa, Asia, and the Americas didn't really seem to do that.  They assumed 1) that non-European peoples were naturally, intellectually inferior, so they did not seek to understand the cultural intricacies of said peoples, 2) they may have been using models of conversion by dominance that were practiced in Europe (i.e: the Roman Empire).
 
Don't get me wrong: in every sense, non-European Catholic nations are definitely Catholic -- Catholicism is one of the most powerful aspects of culture.  However, some aspects of culture are not usurped by Catholicism, because of the failure of the Christian missionaries -- Vodou, which is simply the vestiges of African paganism, is one of them.
 
However, liberals grossly distort the dominance of Vodou in Haiti, and other black Catholic nations, because they have this idea, implicitly, that Catholicism cannot be a legitimate religion of non-European peoples.  It should be obvious to everyone that this idea is racist, as it's based solely on the race of people.  There are impossible statistics presented by social scientists -- I've read claims that "...Haiti is 100% Vodou." To anyone that is even remotely knowledgeable about statistics, it should be obvious that this is a statistical impossibility.
 
We should also consider that all Catholic nations have converted, at some point in their history, from paganism; when we consider this, the situation in non-European nations is actually the same mass conversion scenario repeated with different so-called racial groups.
 
The prevalence of Vodou could be paralleled to the tendency toward radical individualism in Western nations -- it's a rival tradition to Catholicism in those nations...
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#10
Thanks!

i studied Haiti last year, and learned some stuff about Voodo. i saw a movie where people where doing some sort of strange pagan voodo rituals, invloving a snake god and "st Patrick". there was writhing, it looked satanic. Thanks for the Information Confusedmile:
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