Married Priests
#11
We''ve baby sat their kids.  They seem really happy and normal to me.

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#12
(12-16-2013, 08:24 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: No, it is not just a few cases, Cetil, really.  It is the norm and it is prevalent.  And those men are fine priests.

The father of my Russian professor in college was a Ukrainian Byzantine Rite priest.  His was the first Divine Liturgy I attended; that was in 1983.  He died praying his breviary.  He was a holy man.

I don't think you read my post. In any event it is not the norm. As recently as 1996 Rome ruled some ordinations of married men illicit in the Eastern churches. "Archbishop Cyril Vasil, secretary of the Congregation for Eastern Churches, told CNS in Rome that the Vatican reconfirmed the general ban in 2008, “but in individual cases, in consultation with the national bishops’ conference, a dispensation can be given” allowing the ordination.
http://www.cnewa.org/default.aspx?ID=1699&pagetypeID=8&sitecode=HQ&pageno=1

I wasn't disputing the holiness of anyone.

C.
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#13
I know a priest who says that the priest shortage is "our own fault" (the Church's fault) because they won't ordain all of the guys who left the seminary and priesthood in the 60s-80s to get married, even though we allow the Anglican pastors who convert to become ordained as married men. Three guesses what the homily is about whenever we read the Gospel story about Peter's mother-in-law.  :eyeroll:
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#14
(12-16-2013, 08:11 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(12-16-2013, 07:13 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Many trads attend the Divine LIturgy at Byzantine Rite churches, which have married priests.  I would be interested to hear from them.

There are very few married priests in the Eastern Catholic churches in the USA where celibacy was imposed on them by Pius XI. Now it is quietly allowed but there are only a few cases that I have heard of. It may be different in Europe and elsewhere though confusion reigns on this subject. One important point to keep in mind I think is that the while the Eastern Orthodox have always ordained married men they still suffer a vocations shortage. I have my doubts there are that many married Catholic men out there who want to be priests.

C.

I am one of those "not many."

And no I don't agree that we are all against married clergy for the western rites.
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#15
(12-17-2013, 12:06 AM)Unum Sint Wrote:
(12-16-2013, 08:11 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(12-16-2013, 07:13 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Many trads attend the Divine LIturgy at Byzantine Rite churches, which have married priests.  I would be interested to hear from them.

There are very few married priests in the Eastern Catholic churches in the USA where celibacy was imposed on them by Pius XI. Now it is quietly allowed but there are only a few cases that I have heard of. It may be different in Europe and elsewhere though confusion reigns on this subject. One important point to keep in mind I think is that the while the Eastern Orthodox have always ordained married men they still suffer a vocations shortage. I have my doubts there are that many married Catholic men out there who want to be priests.

C.

I am one of those "not many."

And no I don't agree that we are all against married clergy for the western rites.

Meaning you wish to be ordained? I don't necessarily have a problem with it but it's not an easy question. 

C.
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#16
I work with a woman who is married to a protestant pastor, and she said she never sees him and that this is a big issue in their family, they both have busy jobs and spend little time together at home.
I told her that she is a walking advocate for a celibate clergy and she agreed with me.
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#17
(12-17-2013, 12:34 AM)Cetil Wrote:
(12-17-2013, 12:06 AM)Unum Sint Wrote:
(12-16-2013, 08:11 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(12-16-2013, 07:13 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Many trads attend the Divine LIturgy at Byzantine Rite churches, which have married priests.  I would be interested to hear from them.

There are very few married priests in the Eastern Catholic churches in the USA where celibacy was imposed on them by Pius XI. Now it is quietly allowed but there are only a few cases that I have heard of. It may be different in Europe and elsewhere though confusion reigns on this subject. One important point to keep in mind I think is that the while the Eastern Orthodox have always ordained married men they still suffer a vocations shortage. I have my doubts there are that many married Catholic men out there who want to be priests.

C.

I am one of those "not many."

And no I don't agree that we are all against married clergy for the western rites.

Meaning you wish to be ordained? I don't necessarily have a problem with it but it's not an easy question. 

C.

Of course it's not easy and plus if such a thing would be used by dissenters to injure the Church then I would be ultimately against it.
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#18
(12-16-2013, 10:02 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(12-16-2013, 08:24 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: No, it is not just a few cases, Cetil, really.  It is the norm and it is prevalent.  And those men are fine priests.

The father of my Russian professor in college was a Ukrainian Byzantine Rite priest.  His was the first Divine Liturgy I attended; that was in 1983.  He died praying his breviary.  He was a holy man.

I don't think you read my post. In any event it is not the norm. As recently as 1996 Rome ruled some ordinations of married men illicit in the Eastern churches. "Archbishop Cyril Vasil, secretary of the Congregation for Eastern Churches, told CNS in Rome that the Vatican reconfirmed the general ban in 2008, “but in individual cases, in consultation with the national bishops’ conference, a dispensation can be given” allowing the ordination.
http://www.cnewa.org/default.aspx?ID=1699&pagetypeID=8&sitecode=HQ&pageno=1I wasn't disputing the holiness of anyone.

C.

The ban referenced above was for North America and Australia.  No problem in Europe and other places.
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#19
(12-16-2013, 07:13 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Many trads attend the Divine LIturgy at Byzantine Rite churches, which have married priests.  I would be interested to hear from them.

I've spent most of life in both rites, being descended from Latin Rite and Byzantine Rite Catholics.  The founding pastor of my former parish was married.  The priest who taught my daughter's iconography class is married, with two children.  You can meet him here:

http://www.stnickbyz.com/?news&id=201

I've personally met four married priests and am familiar with two others.  Although I'm not an advocate for a married priesthood, all the married priests I've known appeared to be very devout.
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#20
(12-17-2013, 08:11 PM)DJR Wrote:
(12-16-2013, 10:02 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(12-16-2013, 08:24 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: No, it is not just a few cases, Cetil, really.  It is the norm and it is prevalent.  And those men are fine priests.

The father of my Russian professor in college was a Ukrainian Byzantine Rite priest.  His was the first Divine Liturgy I attended; that was in 1983.  He died praying his breviary.  He was a holy man.

I don't think you read my post. In any event it is not the norm. As recently as 1996 Rome ruled some ordinations of married men illicit in the Eastern churches. "Archbishop Cyril Vasil, secretary of the Congregation for Eastern Churches, told CNS in Rome that the Vatican reconfirmed the general ban in 2008, “but in individual cases, in consultation with the national bishops’ conference, a dispensation can be given” allowing the ordination.
http://www.cnewa.org/default.aspx?ID=1699&pagetypeID=8&sitecode=HQ&pageno=1I wasn't disputing the holiness of anyone.

C.

The ban referenced above was for North America and Australia.  No problem in Europe and other places.

Unfortunately, it appears to be at the discretion of the episcopal conference. In Italy for example they are banned according to this: http://orthocath.wordpress.com/2011/03/0...d-priests/

C.
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