Cuture Issue?
#1
Before the era of colonization why was there an advanced degree of culture (buildings, public works, etc etc etc ) in Europe and Asia and even in South America, but in Africa they lived as savages. Why had they not built a civilization like the others? Any idea's?
Reply
#2
They had in some parts. The Mali Empire was very wealthy and civilized during the 1300s and you also cannot forget the advanced North African civilizations of Egypt, Cathage, Moors, Axum ect.

But much of the reason Africa never was civilized could be chalked up to be is just because the tribes never got beyond being tribes, same for why much of the Americas was still savage and uncivilized.



I know some liberal-pinko will whine and blab that the natives were so much more "advanced" and "peaceful" and blah blah blah and how we can't judge just cause they didn't wear pants.
Reply
#3
Favorable climate and resources permitted them to continue their simpler way of life.
Reply
#4
(01-07-2014, 09:39 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Favorable climate and resources permitted them to continue their simpler way of life.

But this doesn't hold in other areas with similar climate and resources.

Reply
#5
Ethiopian culture has been advanced for a long time.  A lot of beautiful ancient architechture is there.

I remember reading Guns, Germs & Steel awhile back and finding it very fascinating but it's been a long time.  Generally the theory is that Europe has a better climate for agriculture which encourages a civilization to stay put and develop itself.
Reply
#6
Explanations that attribute everything to one factor seem to me to be reductionist. I imagine it is a mixture of things like geography, climate, culture, and so forth. Given what we now know, it strikes me as a bit superstitious to think that heredity does not also play at least some role. Of course, even "primitive" cultures have unique and valuable practices and institutions and are very important to those raised in those cultures, no matter how inferior they might seem to outsiders, so we shouldn't imagine that there is only one scale with which to judge every society. 
Reply
#7
(01-07-2014, 11:18 PM)Chestertonian Wrote: Ethiopian culture has been advanced for a long time.  A lot of beautiful ancient architechture is there.

I remember reading Guns, Germs & Steel awhile back and finding it very fascinating but it's been a long time.  Generally the theory is that Europe has a better climate for agriculture which encourages a civilization to stay put and develop itself.

Problem with that theory, is N America. It's clearly suitable for a pastoral society, but the Indians clearly didn't want to embrace it, because their animistic religion encouraged a more nomadic style
Reply
#8
(01-07-2014, 11:53 PM)austenbosten Wrote:
(01-07-2014, 11:18 PM)Chestertonian Wrote: Ethiopian culture has been advanced for a long time.  A lot of beautiful ancient architechture is there.

I remember reading Guns, Germs & Steel awhile back and finding it very fascinating but it's been a long time.  Generally the theory is that Europe has a better climate for agriculture which encourages a civilization to stay put and develop itself.

Problem with that theory, is N America. It's clearly suitable for a pastoral society, but the Indians clearly didn't want to embrace it, because their animistic religion encouraged a more nomadic style

Um....

But what about the Indians (ahem... Aboriginals here in Canada) that lived in towns and practiced agriculture when the likes of Cartier arrived? (i.e. Longhouses, Hochelaga, etc). Or the peublos in New Mexico? Or the Incas etc in Mexico?

You do know that part of the definition of a "pastoral society" is the fact that they're nomadic, right? And that there are examples of actual pastoral societies in N. America, such as the Navajo?

Part of the difference in Europe is that they were exceptionally good at appropriating technology and adapting/refining it for their use. Good examples include the waterwheel and the printing press, both of which were appropriated technologies from the East but were foundational to European society.

Another part of that reason, actually is due to the Church. She created institutionalized learning in the form of Universities, so there was the education component, and the entire society was structure based on the needs to the Church and especially the monastic communities. This encourage the level of sophistication in agriculture that developed, which lead to all kinds of other innovations.
Reply
#9

Even beyond the Church setting up universities is the fact that the Holy Faith sets folks up for Science while pantheism and animism and so forth don't. We know God is, that He (and objective reality) exist, that He (and reality) are knowable and operate according to laws, isn't capricious, etc. Without those basic ideas, you're sort of stuck. The American Indians didn't even have the wheel for crying out loud.

And the other HUGE boon is patriarchy. In Africa and among a lot of North American Indian tribes, matriarchy was the thing. See this book to learn why that dooms a people to primitive conditions, how without patriarchy, we're living in caves and grass huts:  http://www.fisheaters.com/garbagegeneration.html



Reply
#10
After Rome it was the Church which generated all we think of as civilization. If it hadn't I'd still be in the Alps with my bow shooting the Teutonic tribes raiding us.Like the frozen body they found some time ago.

tim
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)