Sentences that are true but are associated with Protestantism
#1
Recently I thought about all these "God loves you no matter what" Christians, mostly associated with Protestantism, and came to the conclusion that most, if not all, of them are true. But must be understood properly. And we should try to reclaim them.

They are for example:
'I am a born-again Christian' - indeed, because of the sacrament of Penance.
'You have to accept Jesus Christ as your personal Lord and Saviour' - well, no discussion here.
'God loves you no matter what' - this is true, but he hates your sins. He loves you no matter what but you may choose not to love Him.

Please try to post more of these; Truth cannot be expropriated by heretics.
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#2
"Jesus was a black man"
"God is my co-pilot"



Oh wait....none of those are true  :P
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#3
"austenbosten" Wrote:"Jesus was a black man"
Depends how we define "black".
"austenbosten" Wrote:"God is my co-pilot"
Gay but true.
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#4
Pst, born again with Baptism not Penance.

tim
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#5
(01-10-2014, 06:47 PM)PolishTrad Wrote:
"austenbosten" Wrote:"Jesus was a black man"
Depends how we define "black".
"austenbosten" Wrote:"God is my co-pilot"
Gay but true.

Jesus was not African and as God being a "co-pilot" does that mean we are really in-charge of our lives and God is along for the ride??

Nah my bumper sticker is "God is God and if I have to make a cheesy allegory, then God is the pilot"
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#6
(01-10-2014, 06:59 PM)Tim Wrote: Pst, born again with Baptism not Penance.

tim
But the whole phrase is 'born-again Christian'. After baptism you're born again as a Christian. But the phrase refers to being born again within Christianity.

"austembosten" Wrote:Jesus was not African and as God being a "co-pilot" does that mean we are really in-charge of our lives and God is along for the ride??
Is this girl African?

As for co-piloting, we can always decide not to cooperate with the co-pilot, no?
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#7
Born again is referring to John 3:5, "Jesus answered: Amen, amen I say to thee, unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Ghost, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God."

As for the black thing, African, etc., it's a moot point; Christ's genealogy was purely Semitic and he would not have been black.

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#8
(01-10-2014, 07:14 PM)PolishTrad Wrote: Is this girl African?

no, she is asian, indian to be specific.
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#9

I have a bit on this on this page on FE: http://www.fisheaters.com/differences.html



Either/Or -vs- Both/And

This brings us to the "either/or" phenomenon found in some Christian groups. It appears to work like this:


    "if you don't believe that faith alone saves, then you must believe that you can work your way into Heaven (something Catholics are constantly falsely accused of believing),"
    "if you don't believe in sola scriptura, then you are a follower of the 'traditions of men',"
    "if you think we can cooperate in our salvation, then you're saying that Christ isn't enough,"
    "if you believe that one can freely turn his back on God, then you're denying God's omnipotence," etc.

These either/or arguments consist of an "if" statement, coupled with an implied premise that amounts to a false dichotomy, and followed by an invalid conclusion.

Catholic rebuttals to these sorts of assertions often rely on the heavy use of prepositions:


    "we are saved by grace, through faith and works inspired by the Holy Spirit's love,"
    "the source of Christian Truth is the Church that is guided by the Holy Spirit and which is both the source of and is bound by Sacred Scripture,"
    "we are saved solely by the grace of the Cross, with which we must co-operate,"
    "God can do whatever He wants, whenever He wants, but He chose to give us free will with which we can freely choose Him," etc.

It's been said that the Catholic Church is a "both/and" Church; another way of saying it is that, when arguing with Protestants, we are a "Yes, but..." Church:


    "Yes, grace saves through faith -- but a faith that works,"
    "Yes, Christ is the only way to the Father, but we Christians co-operate with Him in His divine plan and therefore, in a real but limited sense, play a co-redemptive role in salvation history,"
    "Yes, we must be born again, but 'born again' refers to Baptism,"
    "Yes, Christ is the Spiritual Rock of the Church, but He made Peter the earthly Rock" etc.

Like I intimated, subtlety required. We don't see dichotomies where none exist.

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