Philosophy and Catholicism
#1
Peace be with you all,

I've started to look into the philosophic divides between Platonism and Aristotelianism and have found myself leaning more towards the former, perhaps I'm a bit more mystical than academic. But anyway, the tie between Aristotle and Catholicism is so strong I almost wonder whether entertaining different philosophical views is permissible. I just wanted to ask some of you more knowledgeable folks to what extent we could hold different philosophical positions (as in adhere to different philosophical systems), and whether we can for example believe that there is a distinction between the Essence and Existence of God.

Thank you in advance!

-Mort
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#2
(01-28-2014, 09:25 PM)mortify Wrote: Peace be with you all,

I've started to look into the philosophic divides between Platonism and Aristotelianism and have found myself leaning more towards the former, perhaps I'm a bit more mystical than academic. But anyway, the tie between Aristotle and Catholicism is so strong I almost wonder whether entertaining different philosophical views is permissible. I just wanted to ask some of you more knowledgeable folks to what extent we could hold different philosophical positions (as in adhere to different philosophical systems), and whether we can for example believe that there is a distinction between the Essence and Existence of God.

Thank you in advance!

-Mort

What do you think our philosophers did before Saint Thomas? :grin: Ask Tim, he's a proponent of greater Platonist thought in the Church over Aquinas' Aristotle.  Do not fear.  You are not going against the Church by favouring one over the other.
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#3
It seems like the Magisterium has widely endorsed Aristotle, even though his materialism bothers me. It's hard to think one could support anything else since even the Summa was placed on the Holy Altar.
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#4
This is something I've been thinking a lot about recently (I made a post a week or so ago).

One thing I read--and it was pretty complicated to me--was something how Aristotelian thought led tot he emphasis on the intellect of God, while neo-Platonism focused on His will.

I wonder if that's why traditional Thomistic/Scholastic thought can come off as cold, legalistic, etc. and concerned about the tangled web of truth as opposed to simple charity and doing the best we can.

Of course, don't get me wrong--some of the most serious Thomists I've known have also been the most charitable, so it's not mutually exclusive by an means.

I would love to learn more about neo-Platonism, personally. Tolkein was a neo-Platonist and I find that quite interesting as his writing on a spiritual level really resonates with me. Also, I am by far more drawn to early fathers and eastern saints than later western saints.
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#5
One of the benefits of thomism from what I understand is that it is a closed system in the sense that it is quite excellent defence of the faith that is difficult to disassemble which in the last two hundred years has been greatly needed, but the downside is it doesn't allow much in the way of mysticism and kind of that creativity.  Hence why after Vatican II, even in the Dominican Order there was a tendency to blacklist Aquinas as well as Augustine.  And instead go to the "peripheries " and study Heidegger, Jung, and Buddhist philosophies.  Now Thomism is back in style in most places mainly because of JPII (Benedict was more of an Augustinian in outlook) where there are two trains of thought of essentially reAristotlizing Thomism or merging Neoplatoism into Thomism (which Thomas used a lot of neoplatoism remember)
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#6
Can a Roman Catholic accept the Palamite distinction between Essence and Energies?
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#7
(01-28-2014, 09:25 PM)mortify Wrote: Peace be with you all,

I've started to look into the philosophic divides between Platonism and Aristotelianism and have found myself leaning more towards the former, perhaps I'm a bit more mystical than academic. But anyway, the tie between Aristotle and Catholicism is so strong I almost wonder whether entertaining different philosophical views is permissible. I just wanted to ask some of you more knowledgeable folks to what extent we could hold different philosophical positions (as in adhere to different philosophical systems), and whether we can for example believe that there is a distinction between the Essence and Existence of God.

Thank you in advance!

-Mort

I myself just started to look at the relationship between philosophy and catholicism, fairly new to catholicism in the traditional way and still fairly new to philosophy considering how much there is to thumb through. Both I am sure will be my lifelong pursuit.
I myself also love Plato and identify with what he writes about way more than Aristotle, although Aristotle cant be forgotten about, I don't like him, although some of his philosophy has been used to set forth things like the consecration, to my understanding anyways.

I am also realizing I think I know alot more than I do, and I really am learning that here :)
Anyways im reading a really good book on the history of Plato and Aristotle on western thinking and the whole middle part of the book is the church thinkers, its called The Cave and The Light if your interested. Ill be done with it soon if you wanna trade some books.

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#8

You might be interested in the writings of Charles Coulombe. See, for ex., this page:  http://charlescoulombe.blogspot.com/2011...m-faq.html

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#9
Also, heres a really good encyclical from John Paul II on philosophy. Very rich.

http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_p...io_en.html
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