Pope Francis: Regain a Sense of the Sacred
#1


From Zenit:




Pope Francis Calls on Faithful to Regain "Sense of the Sacred"
Says Eucharist is Opportunity to Enter Into the Mystery of God


VATICAN CITY, February 10, 2014 (Zenit.org) - In his homily this morning at Casa Santa Marta, Pope Francis invited the faithful to “enter into the mystery of God” in the Eucharist and rediscover the sense of the sacred.

Reflecting on today’s first reading, which recalled the manifestation of God in the form of a cloud at the temple during the reign of King Solomon, the Holy Father said that while God spoke through his people through the prophets and Scripture, the Lord speaks in a different manner through this theophany. This theophany occurs today through the liturgical celebration, particularly the Eucharist.

“When we celebrate the Mass, we don’t accomplish a representation of the Last Supper: no, it is not a representation,” he stressed. “It is something else: it is the Last Supper itself. It is to really live once more the Passion and the redeeming Death of the Lord. It is a theophany: the Lord is made present on the altar to be offered to the Father for the salvation of the world.”

Vox Wrote:Credo -- but I wouldn't if going by my senses in most parishes:


“We hear or we say, ‘But, I can’t now, I have to go to Mass, I have to go to hear Mass.’ The Mass is not ‘heard’, it is participated in, and it is a participation in this theophany, in this mystery of the presence of the Lord among us.”

The Pope went on to say that despite the importance of God’s presence in the liturgy, many often spend their time in Mass looking at the clock and “counting [down] the minutes.”

“This is not the attitude the liturgy requires of us: the liturgy is God’s time, God’s space, and we must place ourselves there, in God’s time, in God’s space, and not look at the clock,” he said.

Vox Wrote:Kind of hard to do when people are polka-ing in the place:


“The liturgy is to really enter into the mystery of God, to allow ourselves to be brought to the mystery and to be in the mystery. For example, I am sure that all of you have come here to enter into the mystery. However, someone might say: ‘Ah, I have to go to Mass at Santa Marta, because on the sight-seeing tour of Rome, each morning there is a chance to visit the Pope at Santa Marta. It’s a tourist stop, right?’ All of you here, we are gathered here to enter into the mystery: this is the liturgy. It is God’s time, it is God’s space, it is the cloud of God that surrounds all of us.”

Concluding his homily, Pope Francis called on the faithful to ask the Lord to give them the “sense of the sacred” in order to distinguish between everyday devotions and the importance of the Eucharist.

“The Eucharistic celebration is something else,” he said. “In the celebration we enter into the mystery of God, into that street that we cannot control. Only He is the unique One, the glory, the power. He is everything. Let us ask for this grace: that the Lord would teach us to enter into the mystery of God.” (J.A.E.)

Vox Wrote:He says the right things sometimes. Now's the time for him to demand a restoration of a sense of the sacred. TLM everywhere, in all parishes, sacred music, sacred art, sacred architecture, Catholic devotions, sound teaching, emphasizing conversion of the heart, focusing on acts of charity and evangelizing. These are what are needed.



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#2
While I applaud the sentiment, the Holy Father tends to celebrate the liturgy in a very bland and neutral way... at least, in my opinion. Surely, the rite is still valid because the proper form and matter are utilized, but there's a way in which even the holiest things can be made bland. When salt loses its flavour, it's thrown away. Hopefully the Pope will take his own advice and do away with the spotty chasubles, ugly crucifix, and the unsuitable use of the Italian language in St. Peter's. That'd be a good example to set.

Some people are just not big liturgists... but that's no excuse to make the liturgy boring.

As to his general statement about simply looking at the watch and counting down the minutes: it's a good practice to remove all watches during any sacrament, and to have no clocks in the sanctuary or nave in general. Chiros overrides Chronos. Thankfully someone is saying this... though I get the impression it wouldn't need to be said if we all used Eastern Rite or the traditional Roman Rite liturgies... :)

The part of the Mass I most wish to regain the "Sacred" is the Great Doxology: "per ipsum et cum ipso et in ipso..."! When this is sung to plainchant or a simply recited tone - even in the Novus Ordo - it has a very great spiritual effect on all present.

It's hard to really go on about this if we're not priests though; in the end, only pastors can make the decisions to celebrate in a holy fashion, and to force the stubborn middle-aged altar-guild ladies to put the tabernacle where it belongs, reorient the altar, and pray instead of play.
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#3
Perhaps I'm being a "meanie" but if the Pope is calling people to the Eucharist, shouldn't he also be calling people to be properly disposed to partake in the Eucharist?
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#4
(02-10-2014, 03:53 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote: From Zenit:

Pope Francis Calls on Faithful to Regain "Sense of the Sacred"
Says Eucharist is Opportunity to Enter Into the Mystery of God


VATICAN CITY, February 10, 2014 (Zenit.org) - In his homily this morning at Casa Santa Marta, Pope Francis invited the faithful to “enter into the mystery of God” in the Eucharist and rediscover the sense of the sacred.

Reflecting on today’s first reading, which recalled the manifestation of God in the form of a cloud at the temple during the reign of King Solomon, the Holy Father said that while God spoke through his people through the prophets and Scripture, the Lord speaks in a different manner through this theophany. This theophany occurs today through the liturgical celebration, particularly the Eucharist.

“When we celebrate the Mass, we don’t accomplish a representation of the Last Supper: no, it is not a representation,” he stressed. “It is something else: it is the Last Supper itself. It is to really live once more the Passion and the redeeming Death of the Lord. It is a theophany: the Lord is made present on the altar to be offered to the Father for the salvation of the world.”

"I believe and confess that the popish Mass is an invention and ordinance of man, a sacrifice of Antichrist, and a forsaking of the sacrifice of Jesus Christ, that is to say, of his death and passion; and that it is a stinking and infected sepulchre, which hideth and covereth the merit of the blood of Christ; and therefore ought the Mass to be abolished and the holy supper of the Lord to be restored and set in its perfection again." -John Hooper, Anglican Bishop of Gloucester in the reign of Edward VI [1547- 1553]

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#5
Maybe I'm a simpleton or nostalgic, but embracing the mystery and reverent  participation needs Latin. We had a Mass were the lines were clear. The laity can answer what is bolded and no more, and sing where they can actually sing. Latin brings down the invisible Mystical veil. Immediately Latinist and those that known only by rote realize they are in the Presence of the Almighty. Humbling is exactly what it is. That is proper disposition.  What is lost is fear of the Lord. The devil hates Latin, and I have that on good authority. English probably makes him laugh.

tim 
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#6
Tim, could you explain why Latin is somehow more mystical or sacred? Wasn't the Mass itself basically in Greek for 150+ years, when that was the Lingua Franca of the Mediterranean?

I've never loved the traditional Mass because of the Latin; rather, because it approaches and treats God as God ought to be approached and treated.

Quid est veritas?
Vir qui adest.
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#7
As oatmeal notes...isn't it a sacrifice?  I don't attend the Novus Ordo so help me out. I thought it was the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass not a reenactment of the last supper.  I found the meal emphasize here wrong.  Am I wrong?
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#8
(02-10-2014, 05:02 PM)lilangels Wrote: As oatmeal notes...isn't it a sacrifice?  I don't attend the Novus Ordo so help me out. I thought it was the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass not a reenactment of the last supper.  I found the meal emphasize here wrong.  Am I wrong?

As the Holy Father said, in full:

"it is the Last Supper itself. It is to really live once more the Passion and the redeeming Death of the Lord."

Last Supper and Passion are intimately linked. We often think the Passion began in Gethsemane, but it is not so.

I believe there were supposed to be four chalices of wine at the Passover. The Lord made the third into the Precious Blood. The Fourth was not consumed in the Upper Room (very strangely), and was not finally consumed until the Cross. This is why the Lord asked for "this chalice" to pass from Him, in the Garden: the sacrifice of the Last Supper was waiting to be completed. The Father willed for it to be consumed only on the Cross, when all was consummated.

The Pope is no modernist here - refreshingly.
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#9
(02-10-2014, 05:02 PM)lilangels Wrote: As oatmeal notes...isn't it a sacrifice?  I don't attend the Novus Ordo so help me out. I thought it was the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass not a reenactment of the last supper.  I found the meal emphasize here wrong.  Am I wrong?

This quote by the Holy Father is taken from a 2/5 CNA article about his weekly general audience, during which he discussed the Eucharist: Shifting attention to the familiar layout of Catholic churches, the Pope observed that in the “center…we find the altar,” which is “a table that has been prepared and that makes us think of a banquet,” and “on the table, there is a cross to indicate that Christ’s sacrifice is offered on that altar.”

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/t...-reflects/



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#10
First Latin because we are Latin Rite not some other. There are those which say three languages are blessed because they were on the titulus; Latin Greek and Hebrew. It is only since after Vatican II that this idea that the TLM especially the High Mass is the "best" way to say Mass. That is subjective. I dislike polyphony and love simple chant so I naturally prefer the Low Mass. Mass is not about us pleasing God, that was done once by His Son. In fact to my ears that music is a distraction
and does not aid me to be in the proper disposition for Mass.

The vernacular is for every day, but Latin is for God. Yes this was not from the beginning but has become so over time and that is Tradition. Chant is the preferred way to sing a Mass. The Mass is an unbloody re-presentation of the Sacrifice on Calvary and a remembrance of the Last Supper, while pointing to the Lamb's Feast as in Apocalypse.  Beati qui ad cenam nuptiarum Agni vocati sunt

tim
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