Post Vatican II changes to the Liturgical Calendar
#11
(03-02-2014, 11:24 PM)aquinas138 Wrote:
(03-02-2014, 09:04 PM)Cetil Wrote: The Ember and Rogations days were not eliminated. They are still included in the current GIRM:

Yes, just like Friday penances haven't been eliminated. Permission is given to modify the traditional observance, the traditional observance is completely abandoned. Does anyone know a NO parish anywhere in the world where the Ember and Rogation days are publicly celebrated?

That seems often the case and I don't know how much if any catechesis was done but that was the original intent as is seen from USCCB's instruction of 1966:

"17. Vigils and Ember Days, as most now know, no longer oblige to fast and abstinence. However, the liturgical renewal and the deeper appreciation of the joy of the holy days of the Christian year will, we hope, result in a renewed appreciation as to why our forefathers spoke of "a fast before a feast." We impose no fast before any feast-day, but we suggest that the devout will find greater Christian joy in the feasts of the liturgical calendar if they freely bind themselves, for their own motives and in their own spirit of piety, to prepare for each Church festival by a day of particular self-denial, penitential prayer and fasting"

http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/...inence.cfm

I think penance and fasting undertaken voluntarily is more meritorious than what is mandated by law. Granted, there should be some regular sermons and catechesis on the topic. It may surprise many to know how important this was to Pope John XXIII as  he devoted an entire encyclical to the topic, largely unread to this day I think :
" Doing penance for one's sins is a first step towards obtaining forgiveness and winning eternal salvation. That is the clear and explicit teaching of Christ, and no one can fail to see how justified and how right the Catholic Church has always been in constantly insisting on this. She is the spokesman for her divine Redeemer. No individual Christian can grow in perfection, nor can Christianity gain in vigor, except it be on the basis of penance. "
http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_x...am_en.html
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#12
(03-03-2014, 12:40 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(03-02-2014, 11:24 PM)aquinas138 Wrote:
(03-02-2014, 09:04 PM)Cetil Wrote: The Ember and Rogations days were not eliminated. They are still included in the current GIRM:

Yes, just like Friday penances haven't been eliminated. Permission is given to modify the traditional observance, the traditional observance is completely abandoned. Does anyone know a NO parish anywhere in the world where the Ember and Rogation days are publicly celebrated?

But I think that's more a problem with faith formation than anything else. I'm forever telling my fellow NOers about Fridays, and it's always shock and awe when I do. It's not because it doesn't exist or is eliminated, but because most of the population is ignorant of it. Many people will adopt these practices if they are simply informed of them.

But I had to look up what Ember and Rogation days were, because I didn't have a clue. Were they mandatory?

I agree the catechesis is lacking in a big way. Yes Ember and Rogation days were mandatory. Good for you to spread the word!

C.
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#13
Wow, yes excellent to spread the word, I didn't know about Ember and Rogation days. I do know Fridays are still supposed to be meatless but another penance can be substituted, another failure in Catechesis. Thanks for this!
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#14
The Ember Days were classed as ferias, but had penitential elements, such as a Gospel and homily instead of occurrent scripture like Lenten ferias. Before 1960, the September Ember Days are almost always outranked by a feast, and so were reduced to a commemoration; the 1960 reforms elevated them to II Class (and changed when they occur...), so they outrank most of the nearby feasts. The name "Ember" is probably a corruption of "temporum," since these days were called in Latin "(dies) quatuor temporum" "of the four times/seasons." They are the Wednesday, Friday and Saturday after (1) the third Sunday of Advent, (2) the first Sunday of Lent, (3) Pentecost Sunday, and (4) the (liturgical) third Sunday in September. The method of finding the first Sunday of the months August, September, October and November changed in 1960, so the dates are often different than previously; thus the old rule relating to Holy Cross Day is not always accurate.

The Rogation days were chiefly marked by the procession and chanting of the Litany of the Saints and the Rogation Mass. The Greater Rogation on April 25 is the authentically Roman devotion; the Lesser Rogation on the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday before the Ascension is a Gallican devotion later brought to Rome.
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