Queen of England meets Pope Francis
#1
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26867032

Anyone else smile at the gift the Vatican gave to Queen Elizabeth II, for her grandson (the future king and head of the Anglican communion)? It's an orb, made from lapis lazuli to reinforce the implication it's the world, topped by a Templar cross.

(She gave him whiskey and honey.)

[Image: article-2595978-1CCE0F3E00000578-2_634x565.jpg]
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#2
What's the point of the honey?
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#3
There were biscuits, prime cuts of game and other things - it was a big hamper (not very lenten, though she was wearing lilac). The pope apparently said point blank that he was going to give it all to a "poor house." The last thing he said to her as the meeting ended was "please pray for me."
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#4
I have a lapis lazuli rosary.  Maybe I should start using it for a certain intention...  :grin:

I'm trying to identify that whisky  It'll be a single malt, and an good one at that.
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#5
Pff, her proper title is "Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas Queen" ("Defender of the Faith" too, but let's leave that aside).  :P

Humorous implications aside, I wouldn't exactly call that a "Templar Cross". It is the "Cross patée" of heraldry, and was used for the German Empire's Iron Cross as well as some Crusading orders. It's associated with the Teutonic Knights, but the military orders never adopted a specific cross for their habits. Freemasons like to use this one often, sadly.

Interesting gift for Francis to give Her Majesty.

If the Pope "gives it to the poor house", that would be in very poor diplomatic taste. He really does love flaunting protocol.

Very English gift for Her Majesty to give to the Pope! :D
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#6
(04-04-2014, 06:21 AM)Heorot Wrote: Pff, her proper title is "Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas Queen" ("Defender of the Faith" too, but let's leave that aside).  :P

Humorous implications aside, I wouldn't exactly call that a "Templar Cross". It is the "Cross patée" of heraldry, and was used for the German Empire's Iron Cross as well as some Crusading orders. It's associated with the Teutonic Knights, but the military orders never adopted a specific cross for their habits. Freemasons like to use this one often, sadly.

Interesting gift for Francis to give Her Majesty.

If the Pope "gives it to the poor house", that would be in very poor diplomatic taste. He really does love flaunting protocol.

Very English gift for Her Majesty to give to the Pope! :D

Rather have our pope flaunt petty protocol than bandy about luxury food and drink during Lent. Perhaps some of the people who'll eat that produce will have their first ever taste of such things this Sunday. Priorities, Heorot - the world's not all frills and frippery!
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#7
An aside - the eight-pointed cross used by the Knights Hospitaller was a specific cross adopted by a military order for their habits, emblazoned all over the place. So certain crosses were/are certainly identified with the old military orders.
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#8
(04-04-2014, 05:23 AM)Prie dieu Wrote: I have a lapis lazuli rosary.  Maybe I should start using it for a certain intention...  :grin:

I'm trying to identify that whisky  It'll be a single malt, and an good one at that.

[Image: IMG_20140404_142155.jpg]
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#9
That's a beautiful rosary Prie dieu! May our prayers be pleasing to God - i know I'll also be praying for the world to come, willingly and joyfully, to the Lord - and the image of that orb crowned with the triumphant cross will be in my mind.
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#10
(04-04-2014, 06:21 AM)Heorot Wrote: Humorous implications aside, I wouldn't exactly call that a "Templar Cross". It is the "Cross patée" of heraldry, and was used for the German Empire's Iron Cross as well as some Crusading orders.

Apropos for the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha offspring.

(04-04-2014, 06:21 AM)Heorot Wrote: It's associated with the Teutonic Knights, but the military orders never adopted a specific cross for their habits. Freemasons like to use this one often, sadly.


Yes, the Masons have co-opted Knights Templar "brand" so to speak, intended (as is everything they do) to confuse folks without a sense of history as this 19th century Masonic invention has nothing to do with the 12th Century Knights Templar sanctioned by the pope to fight the Crusades.
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