Questions about the new saints
#1
Regardless of whether or not you think the canonization was a good thing, does anyone know the rule regarding their names?  Why are they (and other pope-saints) called Saint Pope JPII and John XXIII?  Why not Saint -their real name, like Saint Karol?  I noticed people talking about Saint Padre Pio....why isn't he just Saint Pio?  And I heard people calling him St. John Paul the Great... like St. Leo the Great...what do you have to do to be called "the Great"? and why aren't all saints called that??

Also,does anyone know what each of the new saints is the patron saint of?  How does that get assigned?  Since he suffered from parkinsons, does St. John Paul II automatically become the patron saint of those who suffer from parkinsons disease? 
Just a couple of curious questions that I'm sure someone on FE knows the answers to!  thank you
Reply
#2
Patre Pio's official name of canonization is Sancte Pio a Pietralcina, in English properly Saint Pio of Pietralcina.

The same way we often use St. Don Bosco, when officially he is Sancte Joannes Bosco, "Don" being a respectful title like "Father".

In the case of Popes, generally in English we say commonly Pope St. Pius X, using their Papal name. For Popes who are blessed, generally in English Blessed precedes Pope, so it would be Bl. Pope Gregory X. In the Latin official title the term Papa (Pope) comes after the name ad is often not used, So it would be Sancte Pio X, Papa; or Beate Gregorius X, Papa.
Reply
#3
Regarding calling a Saint "the Great," it's basically just a matter of popular acclaim--there's no rule or definitive criteria, etc.  Non-papal Saints called "the Great" include St. Basil, St. Gertrude, and St. Albert. Also, St. Nicholas I is a pope who is also sometimes called "the Great," although less consistently than Sts. Leo and Gregory.

Regarding being a patron saint, sometimes the Pope might declare a Saint the patron of something--for example, Pius XII named St. Clare the patron of television.  More often, however, it is an organic process in the Church where through the devotion and prayers of the faithful a Saint becomes popularly associated with certain issues.
Reply
#4
thanks for the info.... I guess I'm still not clear why they wouldn't use their birth-name for their saint name, since they were made a saint because they lived a pious life, not necessarily for only what they did while they held the office of pope... I guess I figured that their baptismal name would trump the name they picked as pope.
Reply
#5
(04-30-2014, 05:21 PM)catholicschoolmom Wrote: thanks for the info.... I guess I'm still not clear why they wouldn't use their birth-name for their saint name, since they were made a saint because they lived a pious life, not necessarily for only what they did while they held the office of pope... I guess I figured that their baptismal name would trump the name they picked as pope.

But they were not each two men trapped in one body -- one Pope, the other regular Catholic. The man and his actions are intimately tied together, because a man is sanctified or fails to be sanctified in the actual state in life he is in. This is one serious problem with these canonizations, of course. You cannot separate the man from his Pontificate. If he failed in his duties as Pope, he failed in his duties toward God. If he succeeded in his duties as Pope, then he succeeded in pleasing God.

To suggest that the man can be split would be to suggest a kind of multiple-personality disorder.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)