Are Sonograms Behind Autism?
#21
Frankly, I think a lot of these issues growing with children are environmentally. most water supplies are contaminated by pharmaceuticals, most pesticides are nerve agents, etc  While the effect on an adult is largely slim, the effect on a growing fetus probably isn't as well studied.  Then you know infant and child mortality is much lower than it was two-three generations ago.  Back then, a child with celiac probably wouldn't have survived very long.  People who have disposition toward allergies such as peanut, have probably bred giving those characteristic to their offspring. 
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#22
(05-21-2014, 05:58 PM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(05-21-2014, 04:43 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: PrairieMom,

Diet and exercise is where I start when I speak with parents about their children.  Often, a little tweak makes a huge difference. 

I'm not surprised about the heavy exercise being helpful - especially given your daughter's sensory integration issues.  I actually used to use cross-lateral movement in class when my students were squirrely to help them settle down.  I could often get a lot more work out of them that way.  It helped the whole class and not just the ones with challenges.

Yes. Heavy work, deep pressure (hence why swimming is such a big deal for her) and brushing seems to be what she needs. Have you tried any brushing protocols with your students? We find it helps immensely. I get her to sit on a ball at home too, it helps her calm down and focus.

Brushing no, but disk seats and balls, fidgets (though this is hard not to see as a toy), chewing things, bands on the bottoms of desks, compression sessions, weighted blankets, even aromatherapy.
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#23
(05-21-2014, 06:16 PM)Vox Clamantis Wrote:
Prairie Mom Wrote:Her favorite lunch: Sunday night leftovers... roast chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy, honey carrots with dill, peas or broccoli and mashed TURNIP! LOL

Roast chicken??? Carrots??? PEAS? What kind of HORRIBLE MOTHER ARE YOU? Don't you know your kid needs Ritz crackers, too?!

Seriously, check this out, from www.weightymatters.ca:

From Weighty Matters Wrote:Apparently if a child's lunch is deemed "unbalanced", where "balance" refers to ensuring that a lunch conforms to the proportions of food groups as laid out by Canada's awful Food Guide, then that child's lunch is "supplemented", and their parent is fined.

Blog reader Kristen Bartkiw received just such a fine.

She sent her children to daycare with with lunches containing leftover homemade roast beef and potatoes, carrots, an orange and some milk.


She did not send along any "grains".

As a consequence the school provided her children with, I kid you not, supplemental Ritz Crackers, and her with a $10 fine.

As Kristen writes, had she sent along lunches consisting of, "microwave Kraft Dinner and a hot dog, a package of fruit twists, a Cheestring, and a juice box" those lunches would have sailed right through this idiocy. But her whole food, homemade lunches? They lacked Ritz Crackers.

The note she got from school:

[Image: badlunch.jpg]

LOL, I know, wasn't that stupid? It was quite the do in the media here a few months ago. I can't remember offhand what province that is, but at least here in this province for licensing you only need to hit 3 of the 4 food groups.
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#24
Saw an article on autism and adults on CNN this morning.  Worth the read, if perhaps most notably for the amazing quote at the top that I can't paste here. 


http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/20/health/aut...hpt=hp_bn1

CNN iReport
By Francesca Happé, Special to CNN
updated 2:47 PM EDT, Tue May 20, 2014
CNN iReport asked adults on the autism spectrum to describe how the disorder affects them. Learn more about Zoey's story on iReport.
HIDE CAPTION
Living with autism as an adult
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Adults are vastly underrepresented in autism research, scientist says
Leaving high school is a time of vulnerability for people with autism
One study showed highly elevated rates of obesity in adults with autism

Editor's note: Francesca Happé is president of the International Society for Autism Research, a professor of cognitive neuroscience, and director of the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London. Opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author.
(CNN) -- As the world's leading autism researchers and advocates gathered at the International Meeting for Autism Research last weekend to share the latest discoveries about autism spectrum disorder, a strong theme emerged: Autism is growing up.
When you think of autism, you probably think of young children. But children with autism grow up to be adults with autism, and eventually (God willing) elderly people with autism.
In fact, most people with autism are adults, and most adults with autism lack services -- or even a diagnosis.
In her conference keynote address, Marsha Mailick, director of the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shared data gleaned from 10 years of following the lives of more than 400 people with autism, starting in 1998. This study was prescient; adults are vastly underrepresented in autism research, and longitudinal studies into old age are badly needed.
Some good news emerged from Mailick's study: Autistic symptoms, such as impaired verbal and nonverbal communication and social interaction, and rigid/repetitive behaviors, decreased over time among one-third to half of the study participants, and stayed stable in many others. Independent living skills remained stable in this group, as well.
However, leaving high school was a time of vulnerability for participants when, especially in low-income families, previous gains in skills and behavior slowed or plateaued. Work or study was minimal for a quarter of the individuals with autism, and over time women with autism in particular showed a decline in vocationally occupied hours.
I hired someone with Asperger's -- now what?
The impact on self-esteem and mental health can only be imagined; people with autism are very prone to anxiety and depression.
The impact of autism on physical health was also highlighted at the conference by new data from Dr. Lisa Croen of Kaiser Permanente, who reported highly elevated rates of hypertension, diabetes and obesity from the medical records of more than 2,000 adults with autism (compared with 20,000 comparison adults without autism).
What can we take away from this? Physicians need to be aware that patients with autism may have communication difficulties that limit their reports of early health problems, and sensory sensitivities that may reduce their tolerance for investigations and treatment.
The children first described as "autistic" by Leo Kanner in 1943 are now in their seventies, yet there are no more than a handful of research papers on the elderly with ASD.
Dr. Joe Piven of the University of North Carolina spent three years trying to trace elderly people with autism, and reported at this meeting on just 20 individuals he and his colleagues had found, all with intellectual disabilities.
Intriguingly, this group of severely affected older adults with autism showed high rates of Parkinson-like movement problems. Do these reflect a history of medication or premature aging, or are they a clue to a previously unknown neuropathology associated with "grownup" autism?
More clues will come from work being carried out in the Netherlands by Hilde Geurts and her colleagues, who presented at the conference this year.
Their preliminary findings from approximately 200 older adults with autism and comparison adults without the disorder show quality of life is lower in adults with autism, and cognitive problems were higher, but in their group of 19- to 78-year-olds, age did not predict these difficulties.
An enormous amount of exciting research emerged from the conference, much of it focused on improving detection and diagnosis, expanding treatment options, and, in certain instances, even reversing core symptoms for some young children with ASD.
But as we expand our research, we must also devote more resources to improving adult services and better addressing lifespan issues of those living with ASD today.
It's not just about the kids anymore.

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#25
Quote:Intriguingly, this group of severely affected older adults with autism showed high rates of Parkinson-like movement problems. Do these reflect a history of medication or premature aging, or are they a clue to a previously unknown neuropathology associated with "grownup" autism?

I found this question most intriguing!

The prospect of life after high school is daunting. We're preparing now, but fully expect our daughter to be living with us through her 20's (our goal is to have an out-of-the-home living arrangment in place by the time she's 30, by then my husband and I will be in our late 50's, early 60s). But what happens to these kids as they age isn't well understood, and that's scary. So much time, energy and resources are poured into early childhood identification and therapy that the older ones get left behind. Hopefully that will change over the coming decades as more and more of them "come of age".
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#26
No one treatment or protocol or mode of therapy is always useful for every patient.  Having said that, this book is mighty interesting: http://www.amazon.com/Impossible-Cure-Homeopathy-Amy-Lansky/dp/0972751408/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1401479897&sr=1-1&keywords=Impossible+Cure

In a past life as a homeopathic practitioner (when I lived in the U.K.), I had the opportunity to treat several children with various diagnoses of "autism" or "Asperger's syndrome" or "AD/HD" or what have you.  Sometimes successfully (as in improvement rather than total disappearance of all symptoms of the diagnosed ailment), and sometimes not.  The latter cases were probably due much more to my own inadequacies and lack of skill than a failure of homeopathy per se.  One thing I did notice, however, and have noticed since on numerous occasions (and some folks just HATE hearing this) is that it's not all that uncommon for AD/HD, at least imho, to be caused by a deficit of the right kind of attention from the parent to the child.

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#27
(05-30-2014, 04:11 PM)J Michael Wrote: One thing I did notice, however, and have noticed since on numerous occasions (and some folks just HATE hearing this) is that it's not all that uncommon for AD/HD, at least imho, to be caused by a deficit of the right kind of attention from the parent to the child.

I've seen the same thing.  :)
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#28
(05-30-2014, 07:59 PM)Fontevrault Wrote:
(05-30-2014, 04:11 PM)J Michael Wrote: One thing I did notice, however, and have noticed since on numerous occasions (and some folks just HATE hearing this) is that it's not all that uncommon for AD/HD, at least imho, to be caused by a deficit of the right kind of attention from the parent to the child.

I've seen the same thing.   :)

Ditto.
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#29
FirstIy, it may just be my personality, but I am immediately skeptical of dramatic editorials. Those concluding paragraphs were fightin' words  :LOL:

Secondly, I am a sonographer. My personal opinion is that the danger is not necessarily sonograms themselves, but how they are used. Sound can be very powerful, and can possibly create mechanical effects as well as heating effects. The magnitude of these effects GREATLY depends on where the focal point of the ultrasound beam is located, the frequency and intensity of the sound used, how long the ultrasound probe is stationary vs moving across the patient's body, the length of the exam, ect. Therefore, while ultrasound used within diagnostic imaging parameters is generally regarded as safe, we are trained in ways to reduce as much as possible the risk of bioeffects. This knowledge is tested in our registry exams. We have thermal indices and mechanical indices that our machines calculate during exams. These estimate a worst-case scenario of how much heating and cavitation is happening in the tissue, so that we can adjust our settings or exam lengths accordingly. The studies I have read specifically regarding ultrasound and autism seem to indicate that the former does not cause the latter.

My advice would be moderation. Read for yourself about possible risks before you decide to have a keepsake ultrasound done. If you have an ultrasound in the ER, be understanding if the sonographer does not want to provide you with keepsake pictures and get the perfect picture of your baby's face- they're trying to minimize exam time out of concern for you both. Also, if you think your doctor is scheduling you for too many ultrasounds, ask questions. Informed consent to medical treatment is a right, and there's nothing wrong with getting a second opinion. At the same time though, if there's a concern for serious complications, don't be afraid to get checked out. Even if we find that it was a false alarm, that doesn't mean it was unnecessary- it sometimes means you get to carry your little one closer to term rather than being induced early without need.

Just like medications and other medical interventions, we weigh benefits vs risk to judge whether or not an exam is needed. The rest we trust to God.
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