10 Things That Should Never Go In the Fridge
#11
Well, I freeze bread, and always keep (kept?!) tomatoes and potatoes in the bottom cabinet of the fridge. So how long is their life expectancy on the kitchen counter or windowsill? 
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#12
I freeze bread, and butter and cheeses for a couple of others. The list in the article isn't what I normally do, it was informative to me as well.

As for eggs, the Chinese are known to eat a 'delicacy' of eggs kept for many years at room temperature or near. Not me thank you very much, but I have heard that coating eggs with olive oil can preserve them even at room temperature for many days.
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#13
(07-25-2014, 08:29 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(07-24-2014, 04:53 PM)J Michael Wrote: Who washes eggs, anyway??  Well, except right before busting them open, that is.

The eggs you buy in the store are washed. Otherwise, they would have a coating on them, which would ick most people out.

The eggs I buy from the farm are not washed, but hand-wiped. Similar, but sometimes still have residue on them.

If only there was a genetically normal chicken farm nearby, as close as the multitude of supermarkets. sad(  Oh well....
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#14
(07-25-2014, 09:53 AM)J Michael Wrote:
(07-25-2014, 08:29 AM)PrairieMom Wrote:
(07-24-2014, 04:53 PM)J Michael Wrote: Who washes eggs, anyway??  Well, except right before busting them open, that is.

The eggs you buy in the store are washed. Otherwise, they would have a coating on them, which would ick most people out.

The eggs I buy from the farm are not washed, but hand-wiped. Similar, but sometimes still have residue on them.

If only there was a genetically normal chicken farm nearby, as close as the multitude of supermarkets. sad(  Oh well....

Yes, we've been very blessed to have a relationship with a local farm for a number of years now. We get pastured, hormone-free beef, chicken and turkey from them, as well as eggs and an organic garden CSA. They sometimes have honey too, although we have another source for local honey as well. They also sell organic grains and baking supplies, etc.

They're a great family farm, pro-life, large homeschooling family. The only thing that's wrong with them is that they're evangelical Christians, and not Catholic. But hey, no one's perfect, eh?
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#15
Interesting. We get fresh eggs from a neighbor, and she always washes them before she brings them, so I never knew that they had any kind of coating.  They go straight into the fridge.  Unsure

We keep potatoes and onions in a little wicker "dresser"- dark, but ventilated.
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#16
(07-28-2014, 01:58 PM)Deidre Wrote: We keep potatoes and onions in a little wicker "dresser"- dark, but ventilated.

Yes but not too close, onions emit a gas that speeds the demise of potatoes.

As for tomatoes on the window sill (where I keep them) they seem to last quite some time and are much less grainy and sweeter than those I used to store in the fridge and they ripen quite nicely there too. When they get close to eating ripe, but I am not ready for them, then they get the fridge, but not for more than a couple days.
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#17
We have our own chickens so our eggs are always fresh from the oven so to speak. 

If you get raw milk you can make your own cream cheese by letting some milk sit out on the counter for several days until it separates.  Granted it will not taste like store bought cream cheese but it will have a very nice taste, much stronger, but then I think it's like homemade cheese vs store bought.  When milk is not pasteurized, it will not go bad, per say, sitting on the counter, rather, it will culture.  I have made my own buttermilk this way, cream cheese, whey, etc.  Pasteurizing kills all the good things in milk that helps to keep it safe.  If people knew what they really did to poor milk before it gets to the store they would be shocked.  Real milk isn't chalky white, but usually creamy yellow, especially in the spring when the grasses are coming on.  The color varies from season to season, as does the flavor, based on what the girls are eating.  If they get into wild onions, well, the flavor is interesting to say the least. 
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#18
I watched Ruth Golding on Victorian Farm make cottage cheese from some milk that had...cultured. I was so jealous! She put fresh herbs in it and everything!
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#19
This a good information. Thanks for sharing this valuable information.
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#20
Here it's either in the fridge or in the mice.  I always chose the fridge.
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