Is there a traditionalist movement in Japan?
#1
There is a 10% chance I may get a job offer to work in Japan sometime in the next year. Is this a fecund place for a Catholic Traditionalist?
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#2
(07-19-2014, 11:54 PM)Pacman Wrote: There is a 10% chance I may get a job offer to work in Japan sometime in the next year. Is this a fecund place for a Catholic Traditionalist?

http://www.sspxasia.com/Countries/Japan/
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#3
Well, there is a very extreme -- and fascinating -- form of traditionalism in Japan, in which the Catholic faith as remembered and transmitted from the original Jesuit missionaries, distorted over time, is stubbornly held against the orthodox teaching reintroduced after 1873.  These are the Kakure Kirishitan:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidden_Christians_of_Japan

http://www.catholiceducation.org/article...e0452.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/12/1...6220071219
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#4
(07-20-2014, 04:18 AM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Well, there is a very extreme -- and fascinating -- form of traditionalism in Japan, in which the Catholic faith as remembered and transmitted from the original Jesuit missionaries, distorted over time, is stubbornly held against the orthodox teaching reintroduced after 1873.  These are the Kakure Kirishitan:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidden_Christians_of_Japan

http://www.catholiceducation.org/article...e0452.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/12/1...6220071219

Fascinating!
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#5
(07-20-2014, 04:18 AM)Clare Brigid Wrote: Well, there is a very extreme -- and fascinating -- form of traditionalism in Japan, in which the Catholic faith as remembered and transmitted from the original Jesuit missionaries, distorted over time, is stubbornly held against the orthodox teaching reintroduced after 1873.  These are the Kakure Kirishitan:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidden_Christians_of_Japan

http://www.catholiceducation.org/article...e0452.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/12/1...6220071219

Wow, I had no idea that the Kakure Krishitan still existed in the present day! I thought they all "re-converted" after missionaries were let back into the country.  As a side note: my grandma says that we're descended from them, which is kinda cool. :)
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#6
And Deidre, that means you may well be descended from the Japanese martyrs.  I have a devotion to them.  I am awed by their fidelity and their suffering, which included many crucifixions.
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#7
(07-20-2014, 08:01 AM)Clare Brigid Wrote: And Deidre, that means you may well be descended from the Japanese martyrs.  I have a devotion to them.  I am awed by their fidelity and their suffering, which included many crucifixions.

I read about them in St. Alphonsus Liguori's Victories of the Martyrs (archive.org, under the title of "ascetical works"). I took special note of the Japanese ones, thinking the same thing. :)
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#8
Deidre, you might want to read the novel Silence, by Shūsaku Endō.  My friend in Opus Dei read it with a book club.  He said it was very bleak.  Still, you would probably find the historical details fascinating.

It's at Amazon here.

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