men's health & catholic sexual ethics
#1
there are a lot of articles about the Church's teachings on various female health problems... napro technology and all that.  but i haven't read much about applying the Church's teachings to men's sexual health.  (which i will discuss below, so if you don't want to read about it then you might want to go to another thread)

...

let's say, a man has an injury to his testicles or prostate.  or erectile dysfunction due to prostate or testicular cancer, diabetes, or other disorders/surgeries that cause damage to nerves and blood vessels. 

some men take viagra or cialis and the issue is over and done with, but these drugs don't help all men.  There are injections that will cause an erection and many men prefer this as a better therapy.  But doctors don't just hand you a prescription for penile injections, they want the patient to have it done in the office to make sure the dosing is right.  the medication often doesn't instantly produce an erection, but the man is usually asked to induce an erection.  if he does not do this, they won't know if the medication worked. 

Urologists recommend that certain patients do something called "penile rehabilitation."  the goal of which is to get things functioning back to normal.  medication is often part of a penile rehab program, and sometimes therapeutic grade vacuum pumps, and vibration devices are prescribed.  the purpose of this is to get the muscles working and nerves responding and often the recommendation is to have 1 erection per day.  often this is a process for leading up to resuming normal relations with his wife

what is the church's teaching on such things?
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#2
I think you will not find a detailed or casuistic exposition on this issue. Maybe some articles in the magazine, “Medicina e Morale”. Mgr. Elio Sgreccia is an orthodox specialist.

First, for a married man, orthopedics are morally right. So, viagra, cialis, injections and machines before the normal sexual act, are good.

Second, if the man is asked to induce an erection with his wife, as a previous normal expresion of marital love, with no scandal, there is no problem. But the intentional stimulation of either or both spouses to orgasm entirely apart from genital contact must be excluded as morally unacceptable; an act that does not unite the couple in one flesh is not intercourse, and so cannot be marital intercourse.

Third, "penile rehabilitation" must be judged under the double effect principle. They prepare, at least indirectly and remotely, for eventual marital intercourse. Even for elderly couples who no longer have any prospect of intercourse, such incomplete sexual acts can be appropriate expressions of marital affection inasmuch as they continue to realize, to the extent possible, the one-flesh unity realized in previous acts of marital intercourse and to provide the couple with an experience, though imperfect, of their unity [See John C. Ford, S.J., and Gerald Kelly, S.J., Contemporary Moral Theology, vol. 2, Marriage Questions (Westminster, Md.: Newman Press, 1964), 210–13, 224–34.].
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#3
C'mon Chester....you know better! Men don't matter so no mention of us! Back to focusing on the female  :readrules:
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#4
(07-20-2014, 07:28 PM)divinesilence80 Wrote: C'mon Chester....you know better! Men don't matter so no mention of us! Back to focusing on the female  :readrules:

Ha....

plus the feminists often like to cpm plain when certain health plans don't pay for birth control but cover erectile dysfunction treat ment

So a $30 copay for cialis or trimix is offensive even though it corrects a dysfunction while birth control just fucks up s bodily system that is running just fine

now women must get free birth control and men still have to pay for their erections
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#5
(07-20-2014, 11:44 PM)Chestertonian Wrote: Ha....

plus the feminists often like to cpm plain when certain health plans don't pay for birth control but cover erectile dysfunction treat ment

So a $30 copay for cialis or trimix is offensive even though it corrects a dysfunction while birth control just fucks up s bodily system that is running just fine

now women must get free birth control and men still have to pay for their erections

That's because feminism is hypocrisy and a female supremacist movement, nothing more.
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#6
(07-21-2014, 04:23 PM)divinesilence80 Wrote:
(07-20-2014, 11:44 PM)Chestertonian Wrote: Ha....

plus the feminists often like to cpm plain when certain health plans don't pay for birth control but cover erectile dysfunction treat ment

So a $30 copay for cialis or trimix is offensive even though it corrects a dysfunction while birth control just fucks up s bodily system that is running just fine

now women must get free birth control and men still have to pay for their erections

That's because feminism is hypocrisy and a female supremacist movement, nothing more.
while I agree it is not relevant to the original topic
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#7
(07-21-2014, 07:10 PM)Chestertonian Wrote: while I agree it is not relevant to the original topic

Fair enough....hey you're a writer right? We should start a men's magazine that isn't littered with half-naked women and actually talks about the challenges men face!
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#8
Lady here with a legit question!

In connection with the discussion about penile rehabilitation...

My NFP software has "reminders" and one of them is a testicle exam for your partner.  From my research, it seems that testicular exams are quite involved... how moral would a testicular exam be? Does it depend on how "involved" it is?  What if, in the midst of the self-exam, a man becomes aroused?

TIA
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#9
(07-22-2014, 02:10 AM)PatienceAndLove Wrote: Lady here with a legit question!

In connection with the discussion about penile rehabilitation...

My NFP software has "reminders" and one of them is a testicle exam for your partner.  From my research, it seems that testicular exams are quite involved... how moral would a testicular exam be? Does it depend on how "involved" it is?  What if, in the midst of the self-exam, a man becomes aroused?

TIA

Good question.....I'm sure so few guys get them that this probably hasn't been much of an issue. Maybe the principle of double effect holds true here?
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#10
(07-22-2014, 10:23 AM)divinesilence80 Wrote:
(07-22-2014, 02:10 AM)PatienceAndLove Wrote: Lady here with a legit question!

In connection with the discussion about penile rehabilitation...

My NFP software has "reminders" and one of them is a testicle exam for your partner.  From my research, it seems that testicular exams are quite involved... how moral would a testicular exam be? Does it depend on how "involved" it is?  What if, in the midst of the self-exam, a man becomes aroused?

TIA

Good question.....I'm sure so few guys get them that this probably hasn't been much of an issue. Maybe the principle of double effect holds true here?

It's a self-exam...
Do you mean so few guys do testicular exams that it probably hasn't been much of an issue?
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