The Life and Martyrdom of St Sebastian
#1

Many people are familiar with St Sebastian because of his patronage of Soldiers and Boy scouts and the images of his martyrdom are quite ubiquitous throughout the church.  What a lot of people do not know is that St Sebastian was the captain of the Imperial Guard under one of the most savage persecutors of the Church, the emperor Diocletian.  He won many converts  strengthened those facing martyrdom and aided Christians with his ability to work miracles.  He also had the rare privilege of being martyred twice for Christ sake (he was raised from the Dead after his first martyrdom).

One of the great things about Sebastian was his combination of great love for God and great love for his country, despite his country persecuting him and all Christians.

If you are interested in hearing his fascinating life and martyrdom taken from the Acts of the early martyrs it is now available to download or listen to on streaming here:
http://www.alleluiaaudiobooks.com/cathol...sebastian/
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#2
:w2go: :amen: :salute:

Interesting, I never knew about the tradition of his being resurrected. The tradition I know of is that he survived the arrows and was nursed back to health by St. Irene who found him alive (the story in your post says this part too, but later has St. Sebastian say he was raised from the dead).  This is why he is the patron saint of athletes: his body was so strong, the arrows couldn't kill him.  For example, here's common prayer to him:

Dear Commander at the Roman Emperor's court, you chose to be also a soldier of Christ and dared to spread faith in the King of Kings - for which you were condemned to die. Your body, however, proved athletically strong and the executing arrows extremely weak. So another means to kill you was chosen and you gave your life to the Lord. May athletes be always as strong in their faith as their Patron Saint so clearly has been. Amen.

Just to add a later story which is at the root of my devotion to him: in 1414 a ship carrying a statue of him was wrecked off the island of Sicily, near Siracusa.  Everyone survived unhurt and the statue washed ashore. Attributing the safety of those on the ship to St. Sebastian, the bishop decided to make a shrine for the statue in one of the towns in his diocese.  Strangely, no one could lift the statue, which became supernaturally heavy, to bring it to any of the suggested towns.  Finally, people from the small town of Melilli tried to lift it and only they were able to, so that is where the shrine was built and he became their patron.  To this day their descendants have a strong devotion to him, which they have brought wherever they go (I have many forebears named for him--including women--and at least one married couple named Sebastiano and Sebastiana!).
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#3
(07-23-2014, 01:58 PM)SaintSebastian Wrote: :w2go: :amen: :salute:

Interesting, I never knew about the tradition of his being resurrected. The tradition I know of is that he survived the arrows and was nursed back to health by St. Irene who found him alive (the story in your post says this part too, but later has St. Sebastian say he was raised from the dead).  This is why he is the patron saint of athletes: his body was so strong, the arrows couldn't kill him.  For example, here's common prayer to him:

Dear Commander at the Roman Emperor's court, you chose to be also a soldier of Christ and dared to spread faith in the King of Kings - for which you were condemned to die. Your body, however, proved athletically strong and the executing arrows extremely weak. So another means to kill you was chosen and you gave your life to the Lord. May athletes be always as strong in their faith as their Patron Saint so clearly has been. Amen.

Just to add a later story which is at the root of my devotion to him: in 1414 a ship carrying a statue of him was wrecked off the island of Sicily, near Siracusa.  Everyone survived unhurt and the statue washed ashore. Attributing the safety of those on the ship to St. Sebastian, the bishop decided to make a shrine for the statue in one of the towns in his diocese.  Strangely, no one could lift the statue, which became supernaturally heavy, to bring it to any of the suggested towns.  Finally, people from the small town of Melilli tried to lift it and only they were able to, so that is where the shrine was built and he became their patron.  To this day their descendants have a strong devotion to him, which they have brought wherever they go (I have many forebears named for him--including women--and at least one married couple named Sebastiano and Sebastiana!).

I did not know about the tradition either of him being raised from the Dead either until I read that in the acts of the martyrs.  Awesome story about the statue, I forgot to mention in the earlier part of my post that he is one of the 14 holy helpers as well.
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#4
Yep, but depending on the list, he seems to sub in and out of the starting 14, to use an athletics analogy. The plague was often symbolized by arrows and was thought to travel through the air, so what a better helper than the Saint who survived arrows. It seemed a lot off places had success seeking his intercession for this cause, so it always surprises me when I see lists of the 14 that leave him out.   :shrug:
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#5
[Image: Josse_Lieferinxe_-_Saint_Sebastian_Inter...371995.jpg]

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#6
My dad was in the military, and I loved everything having to do with sports as a kid (still do).  So, quite naturally, I chose St. Sebastian as my Confirmation patron.
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#7
(07-23-2014, 08:14 PM)nmoerbeek Wrote: [painting]

I like this painting a lot, thanks for posting it!
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#8
(07-24-2014, 09:09 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote:
(07-23-2014, 08:14 PM)nmoerbeek Wrote: [painting]

I like this painting a lot, thanks for posting it!

Cheers!
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