Sinful or No?
#31
(07-30-2014, 11:57 AM)J Michael Wrote: Sure, but my point is....how appropriate to a serious Christian  lifestyle is such obsession over chariot races, gladiator contests, chess matches, card games, Xbox gaming, Wii gaming, internet and other video gaming?  That's all fine if you're pagan, heathen, or whatever, but supposedly we're not.  Don't get me wrong, I'm not a stodgy Puritan, but if we do not attempt  to integrate, embody and manifest Christian principles, teachings, and behavior into our whole  life,  who are we trying to fool?

Relaxation and recreation (re-creation!) are important elements for one's well-being, but it seems that we have elevated such pursuits to the level of idols in modern society, at the expense of probably our souls.  Even many, many of us who call ourselves "Christian", "Catholic", "Orthodox", whatever.

I think we're talking past each other, brother.  I don't dispute anything in this post.
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#32
(07-30-2014, 12:11 PM)J Michael Wrote: Well...I AM known for being silly. :eyeroll: :grin:

Maybe listen to Fr. Seraphim's lecture, see here ,and you'll understand more what I mean.  He explains it far better than I.

And I did say, "most  people", because in pre-modern times most  people in the world were too busy just trying to survive on what we would consider a pretty basic level to have spare time and money to engage in epicurianism and other such "delights".  But again, I'm not talking about those not engaged in following Christ in a serious manner.

Twelve dollars? Come on, I'm no senator. I can't go on a shopping sprees with my humble scholarship money.

Also, I don't know if I'm against fun all that much. Wouldn't that make me like unto a Muslim?
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#33
(07-30-2014, 12:21 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote:
(07-30-2014, 12:11 PM)J Michael Wrote: Well...I AM known for being silly. :eyeroll: :grin:

Maybe listen to Fr. Seraphim's lecture, see here ,and you'll understand more what I mean.  He explains it far better than I.

And I did say, "most  people", because in pre-modern times most  people in the world were too busy just trying to survive on what we would consider a pretty basic level to have spare time and money to engage in epicurianism and other such "delights".  But again, I'm not talking about those not engaged in following Christ in a serious manner.

Twelve dollars? Come on, I'm no senator. I can't go on a shopping sprees with my humble scholarship money.

Also, I don't know if I'm against fun all that much. Wouldn't that make me like unto a Muslim?

Some has donated it to youtube. Go nuts. :grin:

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#34
(07-30-2014, 12:30 PM)Dirigible Wrote:
(07-30-2014, 12:21 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote:
(07-30-2014, 12:11 PM)J Michael Wrote: Well...I AM known for being silly. :eyeroll: :grin:

Maybe listen to Fr. Seraphim's lecture, see here ,and you'll understand more what I mean.  He explains it far better than I.

And I did say, "most  people", because in pre-modern times most  people in the world were too busy just trying to survive on what we would consider a pretty basic level to have spare time and money to engage in epicurianism and other such "delights".  But again, I'm not talking about those not engaged in following Christ in a serious manner.

Twelve dollars? Come on, I'm no senator. I can't go on a shopping sprees with my humble scholarship money.

Also, I don't know if I'm against fun all that much. Wouldn't that make me like unto a Muslim?

Some has donated it to youtube. Go nuts. :grin:


Excellent!  I was going to offer to lend him my copy.  Now, I don't have to!
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#35
(07-30-2014, 12:33 PM)J Michael Wrote: Excellent!  I was going to offer to lend him my copy.  Now, I don't have to!

:LOL:
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#36
I think there's also some sense in which the pursuits of the young tend to be stigmatized as lesser than other pursuits.  I can remember many a frustrating time with family, being criticized for playing video games, when they would be perfectly happy if I spend the same time reading fluffy fantasy novels like my parents did.

Of course any pursuit can become an obsession - but I haven't seen much evidence that video games are more prone to such obsession than other pursuits.
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#37
(07-30-2014, 04:38 PM)Sunset Wrote: I think there's also some sense in which the pursuits of the young tend to be stigmatized as lesser than other pursuits.  I can remember many a frustrating time with family, being criticized for playing video games, when they would be perfectly happy if I spend the same time reading fluffy fantasy novels like my parents did.

Of course any pursuit can become an obsession - but I haven't seen much evidence that video games are more prone to such obsession than other pursuits.

"The idling of elders is called 'business'. The idling of boys, though quite like it, is punished by those same elders."

-St Augustine
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#38
(07-30-2014, 04:38 PM)Sunset Wrote: I think there's also some sense in which the pursuits of the young tend to be stigmatized as lesser than other pursuits.  I can remember many a frustrating time with family, being criticized for playing video games, when they would be perfectly happy if I spend the same time reading fluffy fantasy novels like my parents did.

Of course any pursuit can become an obsession - but I haven't seen much evidence that video games are more prone to such obsession than other pursuits.

It's the "obsession" part that is problematic.  And what is obsessive for one person may not be for another.  If you find you have trouble tearing yourself away from the pursuit of "fun" or "entertainment" there just might be a problem. :Hmm:
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#39
(07-30-2014, 04:51 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(07-30-2014, 04:38 PM)Sunset Wrote: I think there's also some sense in which the pursuits of the young tend to be stigmatized as lesser than other pursuits.  I can remember many a frustrating time with family, being criticized for playing video games, when they would be perfectly happy if I spend the same time reading fluffy fantasy novels like my parents did.

Of course any pursuit can become an obsession - but I haven't seen much evidence that video games are more prone to such obsession than other pursuits.

It's the "obsession" part that is problematic.  And what is obsessive for one person may not be for another.  If you find you have trouble tearing yourself away from the pursuit of "fun" or "entertainment" there just might be a problem. :Hmm:

Definitely.  I just think that video games have a somewhat unjust reputation for obsession.  And honestly part of the problem is that the young are prone to obsession.  I have seen many a case of overuse of video games resolved by a young man realizing he would like a girlfriend and that requires putting a little more effort into is life.
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#40
(07-30-2014, 06:15 PM)Sunset Wrote: Definitely.  I just think that video games have a somewhat unjust reputation for obsession.  And honestly part of the problem is that the young are prone to obsession.  I have seen many a case of overuse of video games resolved by a young man realizing he would like a girlfriend and that requires putting a little more effort into is life.

I very much agree.  I feel like certain games (chess, some card games like Bridge, etc.) have a reputation for being serious, adult pursuits.  Other games, such as most video games, have a reputation for being silly, childish, and addictive.  I think that that is unfair, as many video games are in fact very artistically created and have plots, characterization, etc. that rival some movies and television series.  I suppose they are also more prone to obsession because they are generally very long.  There is a lot of content in a video game, and just like how people binge watch TV shows, there's a temptation to binge-play a video game.
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