Is it a sin not to fast before Mass?
#11
(07-27-2014, 07:05 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Fasting before Communion is obligatory under pain of sin. It is probably binding under pain of venial sin in most cases.

But the Baltimore Catechism says:

Quote:It is not a sin to break one's fast, but it would be a mortal sin to receive Holy Communion after knowingly breaking the fast necessary for it.

In more detail:
Quote:Q. 902. What should a person do who, through forgetfulness or any other cause, has broken the fast necessary for Holy Communion?

A. A person who through forgetfulness or any other cause has broken the fast necessary for Holy Communion, should again fast and receive Holy Communion the following morning if possible, without returning to confession. It is not a sin to break one's fast, but it would be a mortal sin to receive Holy Communion after knowingly breaking the fast necessary for it.
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#12
i have been fed through a tube 34 hours a day so it is not possible for e to fast..... but i do no tthink f  it as eating
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#13
(07-28-2014, 11:13 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: i have been fed through a tube 34 hours a day so it is not possible for e to fast..... but i do no tthink f  it as eating

Well, even if a moralist would consider that eating, it's clearly a medical exemption from the general rule. It is interesting though to wonder if the manualists of old would consider that eating - is eating the act of chewing and swallowing or the introduction of nutrition?
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#14
(07-27-2014, 08:46 PM)aquinas138 Wrote: I attend the 10am Divine Liturgy at a Byzantine parish, so I take Communion most Sundays around 11:15-11:30 or so.

I can see how you can do it then. Unfortunately I don't have a nearby parish (or a car), so for many weekdays I make due with the three hour fast. If I can catch a mass at 11am I do seek the midnight fast. Many times the mass is at 6pm.

Quote:My priest is aware of my efforts to adopt a more Eastern discipline; I am contemplating a change of rite.

Is it a choice between Novus Ordo or the Byzantine rite?

Quote:Though abstaining from water has not been part of Latin praxis for a long time, it is traditional in the East and, though relaxed somewhat among Eastern Catholics, still technically enjoined among the Orthodox, who tend to legislate the maximum and expect that most people will do less, as opposed to Romans who legislate the minimum and expect people to do more - an interesting cultural difference.

Interesting, I didn't know that. I did try to imitate some of their fasting rules during last lent.

Quote:I certainly didn't bring it up to call attention to my practice,

Of course not.  :P

Quote:but just to mention that, for my situation at least, the traditional practice is eminently doable, and I would feel bad about not keeping it since I know I can! I have fasted at least from food for midnight for several years (water is more recent), even when I attended Latin-rite Masses exclusively, and I usually attended a 11:30 or 1pm Mass then, so it's actually gotten a bit easier. :) I try not to be pharisaical;

You shouldn't feel pharisaical, or too guilty about discussing how you fast. Really I was just really impressed by it, as well as a little worried about whether you were carrying this out in a wise fashion. As long as you're cooperating with a good spiritual advisor, then its probably a good thing you're doing. You clearly sound like you're putting thought into doing it prudently.

Quote:But I certainly don't think I'm better than people who "only" do what the Church asks - I'm pretty sure I'm worse than most!

You should at least think that doing this is better than not doing it. Just as a consecrated virgin ought to believe that maintaining her virginity is better than breaking celibacy, or people in religious vocations should think that they're doing something better than having a lay vocation.

If you don't seriously believe that fasting this hard is good, then isn't it advisable to stop it? Because in that case it really would be just pride. However you seem to be talking about humble submitting to strict fasting (presumable as a penance) out of love for tradition and that can only be a good thing, as long as its done prudently and with obedience (hence spiritual advisor (not sure how that works out in the Byzantine Rite but you seem to have it covered).

Now on the other hand if you were to think badly about those who weren't fasting, even though they're fulfilling Church Canon Law, then I'd have a problem. Just as I would on a virgin, who'd look down on all the girls with broken hymens. If that virgin was to make it into Heaven, while she'd receive the crown of virginity, I have little doubt that her full glory would not be all that great... if she got saved at all.

Keep it up, it was an inspiring post.

Its good and healthy to fast from food. Now I just need to learn to fast from the internet, and learn to arrive one hour before mass consistently, rather than ending up showing up a few minutes before mass starts... which I will in half an hour.
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#15
(07-28-2014, 11:31 AM)Leonhard Wrote:
Quote:My priest is aware of my efforts to adopt a more Eastern discipline; I am contemplating a change of rite.

Is it a choice between Novus Ordo or the Byzantine rite?

There is an FSSP Church about 30 mins from here, and an SSPX chapel up the road, but I feel I have been drifting Eastward in spirituality for a few years now. I say that I am "contemplating" a change of rite rather than "pursuing" as I discern how much of this Eastward drift is escape from the problems in the "West" and how much a genuine love for and embrace of the "East." I freely admit to the former being a factor in beginning to attend the DL in the first place, but the drift began a couple of years before that, especially once I began my graduate studies in Syriac and Coptic. I have found a deep appreciation particularly for St. Ephrem, and I find the Byzantine liturgy shares more in "theological temperament" with St. Ephrem than the Latin liturgy does, while still believing all the Church's rites enshrine the same apostolic Faith. I still love Latin (I have a degree in it and teach it), but I have felt like a stranger a lot of the time in either form of the Roman rite for a while.

I do believe the fast is beneficial as preparation for Communion. The Eucharistic fast is much easier to observe, for me at least, than the restricted diets during the four fasts. Though there is a penitential aspect, I try to think of it more in terms of gaining mastery over the appetites - a different, but certainly not incompatible, emphasis. I think there are many people who naturally have better control of the appetites than I do, and certainly many who have gained such mastery. I'm just a sojourner struggling to stay in the narrow way!
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#16
(07-28-2014, 11:13 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: i have been fed through a tube 34 hours a day so it is not possible for e to fast..... but i do no tthink f  it as eating

Quote:Canon Law on the Sacrament of Eucharist.
"Can.  919
...
§3. The elderly, the infirm, and those who care for them can receive the Most Holy Eucharist even if they have eaten something within the preceding hour."

Chestertonian,  I think you can safely be called infirm.

I care for (not that I do much) my 94 year old mother, but we both are fit to fast for a hour (even if we don't have to).  But your case is certainly worse.
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#17
(07-28-2014, 11:18 AM)aquinas138 Wrote:
(07-28-2014, 11:13 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: i have been fed through a tube 34 hours a day so it is not possible for e to fast..... but i do no tthink f  it as eating

Well, even if a moralist would consider that eating, it's clearly a medical exemption from the general rule. It is interesting though to wonder if the manualists of old would consider that eating - is eating the act of chewing and swallowing or the introduction of nutrition?

I'd say it's probably both, given that one aspect of fasting is going without the pleasure of chewing and swallowing, and another is going without the nutrition.
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#18
(07-28-2014, 03:03 AM)Doce Me Wrote:
(07-27-2014, 07:05 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: Fasting before Communion is obligatory under pain of sin. It is probably binding under pain of venial sin in most cases.

But the Baltimore Catechism says:

Quote:It is not a sin to break one's fast, but it would be a mortal sin to receive Holy Communion after knowingly breaking the fast necessary for it.

In more detail:
Quote:Q. 902. What should a person do who, through forgetfulness or any other cause, has broken the fast necessary for Holy Communion?

A. A person who through forgetfulness or any other cause has broken the fast necessary for Holy Communion, should again fast and receive Holy Communion the following morning if possible, without returning to confession. It is not a sin to break one's fast, but it would be a mortal sin to receive Holy Communion after knowingly breaking the fast necessary for it.

The Baltimore Catechism considers the general custom and law of the Church in place when it was written (late 19th cent.). It was mortally sinful to receive Communion without following the fasting midnight (with exceptions for medical reasons, obviously).

The present Church law does not specify the kind of sin committed by not observing the fast, but given the relaxing of the discipline to such an extent that it is almost impossible to not fulfill the one-hour fast (since it is from communion and most Masses are about 30 mins to 1 hr long), it seems hard to think that the legislator intended to bind under pain of mortal sin. Further, given that the the Friday Abstinence is no longer binding under pain of mortal sin, it is hard to imagine that the Eucharistic Fast of such a short length is.
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#19
What is the purpose of the pre-Communion fast? If you don't have a dispensation from your priest for some reason it would be a sin to break the fast.
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#20
(08-12-2014, 01:52 AM)Silouan Wrote: What is the purpose of the pre-Communion fast?

I think because you are supposed to prepare your soul to worthily receive through penance and prayer. 
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