Is it a sin not to fast before Mass?
#21
(08-12-2014, 01:52 AM)Silouan Wrote: If you don't have a dispensation from your priest for some reason it would be a sin to break the fast.

It's not that legalistic.

The law commands a fast in order to help the soul prepare. If you have some permanent or semi-permanent reason (e.g. a health condition like diabetes) that makes it impossible to observe the fast, you don't get a dispensation, you are simply not bound by the law. The law is meant to help men save their souls by better preparing them for Communion; it does not exist not make the impossible possible.

Since the only reason one is not bound is due to some particular condition (i.e. it is a universal law), a priest cannot dispense you, but he could help to judge that you have a particular condition or situation when you are not bound.

The same goes for Mass attendance on Sundays and Holy Days. You cannot be "dispensed", but lots of things might make it so you are not bound to go to Mass that day. If it's obvious (e.g. you're hours away from Mass, or an illness does not permit you to travel) you can make the call yourself. If it's not, you can ask the priest to judge whether your situation is one where you are not bound. He does not "dispense" you, however.
Reply
#22
(07-27-2014, 05:02 PM)aquinas138 Wrote: (Mass had not been permitted to begin after 1pm for centuries)

Why is that? I have never understood why the church likes mornings so much. Why make people get up for 8am mass on a Sunday? It's usually earlier during the week as well. I personally like evening mass. It's easier to get to, and you have more time to prepare for it.
Reply
#23
(08-17-2014, 11:09 PM)Old_Sarum Wrote:
(07-27-2014, 05:02 PM)aquinas138 Wrote: (Mass had not been permitted to begin after 1pm for centuries)

Why is that? I have never understood why the church likes mornings so much. Why make people get up for 8am mass on a Sunday? It's usually earlier during the week as well. I personally like evening mass. It's easier to get to, and you have more time to prepare for it.

It makes sense when you consider that Mass is part of the Divine Office, though it is often considered separate from it. Properly though, the Divine Office consists of Holy Mass and the canonical hours. The proper place for Mass in the daily schema is after Terce. In the Byzantine rite, preparation for Sunday Divine Liturgy begins Saturday evening with Vespers (Greek tradition) or the Vigil (Slavic tradition), during which many people confess, and continues Sunday morning with Orthros (Greek) or the Hours (Slavic), followed by Divine Liturgy. In both traditions, the (relative) time for the Mass/Divine Liturgy is governed by the canonical hours.

The practice of Mass moving all over the place in terms of time of day is a reflection of the weakening of the canonical hours in the Roman rite - they are virtually unknown in parishes, except for Sunday and festal Vespers in some places. The Roman rite has also tolerated multiple liturgies in the same Church on the same day for some time, which necessitates a certain flexibility in when Mass is celebrated; the Byzantine rite typically resists this, insisting on one DL per Church per day.
Reply
#24
(08-17-2014, 11:09 PM)Old_Sarum Wrote:
(07-27-2014, 05:02 PM)aquinas138 Wrote: (Mass had not been permitted to begin after 1pm for centuries)

Why is that? I have never understood why the church likes mornings so much. Why make people get up for 8am mass on a Sunday? It's usually earlier during the week as well. I personally like evening mass. It's easier to get to, and you have more time to prepare for it.

Our Lord was resurrected very early on a Sunday morning.

Quote:And on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalen cometh early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre; and she saw the stone taken away from the sepulchre.

John 20:1.

Also, I think most people are more interiorly quiet and disposed toward prayer in the mornings after they rise, before they have had to engage with activities, problems and stresses during the day.  That makes it an ideal time.

I'll grant that not everyone is a morning person.  I am, but I learned long ago to accept that some people just aren't.

I appreciate the wisdom of a Benedictine abbot, Dom John Chapman, who said, "Pray as you can, not as you cannot."  I think it applies to conditions as well, so I am glad that the Church became more accommodating to our friends like Old Sarum.  :)
Reply
#25
The one hour fast doesn't seem to make any sense at all if you're regularly assisting at a sung Mass on a Sunday. What with Asperges et al, Communion doesn't even happen until about a little over an hour into the liturgy. So technically, it seems you'd have to be chomping on cheerios with the wee ones in the pew in order to break the fast.

I usually go sans food from midnight to after 11 AM Mass. That's not hard to do.

It's impossible for me to imagine not being able to drink water. I drink so much water. Also, I drink coffee in the morning, because I am weak that way. I "need" at least a cup or two early on around 6 AM or so. Bad, I know.  :((
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
Reply
#26
(08-19-2014, 09:37 AM)Jacafamala Wrote: It's impossible for me to imagine not being able to drink water. I drink so much water. Also, I drink coffee in the morning, because I am weak that way. I "need" at least a cup or two early on around 6 AM or so. Bad, I know.  :((

Water does not break the fast. Drink up.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)