Fresh food for the single person?
#1
Any other fishies have advice on working fresh stuff into the single person diet?  I've been trying to eat a bit healthier, but it seems I'm constantly battling stuff that's only sold in packages.  You can hardly get veggies around here without buying a whole pack.  And I abhor most canned/frozen vegetables, the texture is just wrong.  Fruit is a bit easier, dried fruit is good and you can actually buy just one apple.  But even so there's often not much selection.
Reply
#2
Where do you shop that stuff is sold only in packages?

I know around here, you can buy a single pepper, or a whole bag of peppers, bulk potatoes, or a 10, 20 or even 50 lbs bag, etc. It's usually cheaper to buy the packaged stuff, however (we are a family of soon to be 6, so we buy most things in large packages).

Most veggies will keep a week with proper storage. When I lived alone, I would clean/prep my veggies and portion it out into containers for grab-and-go lunches. Carrots, broccoli, celery, etc all keep well. Peppers, cucumbers will also keep well if you don't cut into them until you plan on eating them. Plan on using things that perish quickly first, then work your way down to the storage stuff. By grocery day around here, it's usually just apples, carrots and potatoes left, LOL. But planning here is the key, as you need to use up food in order.

Or cook up a batch of food with fresh produce. For example, make a stew but eat it for several days. Freeze leftovers if you can tolerate it. Make a bunch of from-scratch tomato sauce. If you want to learn to can, you can make soups etc and process in a canner, they are far superior to anything you will buy in a store texture and taste wise.

You can also try drying veggies. I have a food dehydrator, and will dry veggies to toss in soup etc in the winter.

Find another single person to split large packages of food with.

Or try shopping farmers markets if you have locally. They will usually be happy to sell you a small amount.

But yeah, some frozen veggies are awful. I hate frozen beans and carrots (love either cooked from fresh). I don't mind peas (if they are the petit or small peas) or corn. Frozen spinach or greens is okay for some dishes like a curry or lasagna, but to eat it straight it needs to be cooked from fresh.
Reply
#3
Don't forget to make a tonne of stock. ;)
"Punishment is justice for the unjust." Saint Augustine of Hippo
Reply
#4
There's really not a lot of shopping out in this little one-horse town.  We have a single proper grocery store, and then a walmart.  There's also the practical space limits - this apartment is not large, which means freezing is sharply limited by fact that there's nowhere to put more frozen stuff.  Drying stuff sounds interesting though, especially as I eat soup practically all winter.  Canning would be nice but it looks like a bit much of a start-up investment for right now.
Reply
#5
(09-07-2014, 03:13 PM)Sunset Wrote: There's really not a lot of shopping out in this little one-horse town.  We have a single proper grocery store, and then a walmart.  There's also the practical space limits - this apartment is not large, which means freezing is sharply limited by fact that there's nowhere to put more frozen stuff.  Drying stuff sounds interesting though, especially as I eat soup practically all winter.  Canning would be nice but it looks like a bit much of a start-up investment for right now.

If you learned water-bath canning first, the cost is fairly minimal. You can usually buy the supplies (canner, jars, etc) at yard sales for cheap or even find through kijiji or freecycle for no cost. You do need to buy new lids, but even full price they run about $1.50 for a dozen. The rings can be used year to year as long as they're not deformed or rusted. Things like soup and veggies do require a pressure canner, which is much more costly, but also can often be found used. They can usually double as a pressure-cooker too, which makes preparing dried beans and tough cuts of meat a snap.

Try these websites for a few ideas:

http://www.pickyourown.org/allaboutcanning.htm (has instructions on drying and freezing as well)

http://frozenassets.info/ (check out the photo of the stuff she crams into her little fridge-freezer!)

We do rely a lot on from-scratch soup and dried stuff through the winter. They are easy to prepare and economical, and take up little space. A crock pot helps tremendously preparing food too.
Reply
#6
This is not difficult.

I do the bulk of my food shopping on the weekend.  I buy enough produce for two or three days.  During the middle of the week, I pick up fresh produce for the remainder of the week. 

If you're single, stopping at a market on the way home from work in the middle of the week should not present a problem.
Reply
#7
(09-07-2014, 04:20 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: This is not difficult.

I do the bulk of my food shopping on the weekend.  I buy enough produce for two or three days.  During the middle of the week, I pick up fresh produce for the remainder of the week. 

If you're single, stopping at a market on the way home from work in the middle of the week should not present a problem.

If you're single and have a car and an outside job, stopping at the market on the way home from work in the middle of the week should not present a problem.  If you do most everything from home and don't own a car, it's a bit of a different story.
Reply
#8
I have similar problems with vegs. One unity of, say, lettuce will be way too much for me, and it always spoils.
I don't know if that's your problem (I've never seen vegetables in packages  ??? )

As to buying stuff, I do something similar to what Clare said (except I buy vegetables and fruits on Saturdays, at the Farmers' market). I also don't drive, I just walk (like fifteen minutes). Maybe you can integrate your shopping with some other outdoor thing.
Reply
#9
We're talking about 6 miles to the nearest grocery store.
Reply
#10
How do you buy anything, then?

Indeed I've heard some cities in the US one goes everywhere by cars only. Kinda weird.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)