Pope St. Pius X on St. Thérèse of Lisieux: "greatest saint of modern times" Wow!
#1
Quote:In June 1914 Pope Pius X signed the Decree for the Introduction of the Cause for Canonization and told a missionary bishop privately that Sr. Therese was “the greatest Saint of modern times”.
(source)

Happy feast day!
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#2
Pope St. Pius X was wrong...well, maybe he was right at the time he said it. Now, however, it' might be a tie--between St. Therese and Pope St. Pius X. How big a farce the two recent papal canonizations were can only be understood in the context of the life and writings of Pius X.  St. Pius X, pray for us!
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#3
(09-29-2014, 03:18 PM)tradprof Wrote: Pope St. Pius X was wrong...well, maybe he was right at the time he said it.
He was considered a saint while still alive, so St. Thérèse must be a double-saint! :)
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#4
Here is a letter from the great French, believing Catholic physicist Pierre Duhem (1861-1916) (who always kept in mind Imitation of Christ lib. 1 cap. 3) to his only child, Hélène, whom he affectionately called Toumi:
Pierre Duhem Wrote: Ma Toumi… J'ai fini hier soir [l'autobiographie] de Sœur Thérèse de l'Enfant Jésus. Je suis sous le charme de ce petit livre. Il est merveilleux de voir comme elle vous montre une voie par laquelle, sans être carmélite, sans quitter la carrière où Dieu vous a placé, on pourrait devenir un grand saint. Il y a là, sur l'exercice de la charité, des pensées d'une admirable profondeur. Nous devrions emporter ce petit livre à Cabrespine et la relire sous les châtaigniers de Granel.

[My Toumi…I finished last evening [the autobiography] of Sister Therese of the Infant Jesus. I am charmed by this little book. It is wonderful to see how she shows us a way by which, without being a Carmelite, without leaving the career where God has placed you, one can become a great saint. There are, regarding the exercise of charity, some thoughts of admirable profundity. We should take this little book to Cabrespine and reread it under the chestnut trees of Granel.]
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#5
Fr Von Balthasar, interestingly, in his book on St Therese identifies only two saints of the 19th century who are saints sent directly from God rather than being nourished within the bosom of the Church with God then 'bending' to the wishes of the Church (he identifies the founders of religious orders as such saints); Saint Therese is one and the other is the holy Cure of Ars, St Jean Vianney
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#6
(10-03-2014, 06:35 AM)EnglishConvert Wrote: Fr Von Balthasar, interestingly, in his book on St Therese identifies only two saints of the 19th century who are saints sent directly from God rather than being nourished within the bosom of the Church with God then 'bending' to the wishes of the Church (he identifies the founders of religious orders as such saints); Saint Therese is one and the other is the holy Cure of Ars, St Jean Vianney
Well, "Baal-Bizaar" is a heretic (wouldn't a Catholic want change a name that means "Baal protect the king")? To say saints were not "nourished within the bosom of the Church" is certainly blasphemous because the Church's sacraments are necessary to feed, protect, and save us.
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#7
(10-03-2014, 07:11 PM)Geremia Wrote:
(10-03-2014, 06:35 AM)EnglishConvert Wrote: Fr Von Balthasar, interestingly, in his book on St Therese identifies only two saints of the 19th century who are saints sent directly from God rather than being nourished within the bosom of the Church with God then 'bending' to the wishes of the Church (he identifies the founders of religious orders as such saints); Saint Therese is one and the other is the holy Cure of Ars, St Jean Vianney
Well, "Baal-Bizaar" is a heretic (wouldn't a Catholic want change a name that means "Baal protect the king")? To say saints were not "nourished within the bosom of the Church" is certainly blasphemous because the Church's sacraments are necessary to feed, protect, and save us.

One of our great Saints is named Balthasar. He was one of the three magi. Chill out, Geremia.
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#8
(10-04-2014, 01:20 AM)Vox Clamantis Wrote:
(10-03-2014, 07:11 PM)Geremia Wrote:
(10-03-2014, 06:35 AM)EnglishConvert Wrote: Fr Von Balthasar, interestingly, in his book on St Therese identifies only two saints of the 19th century who are saints sent directly from God rather than being nourished within the bosom of the Church with God then 'bending' to the wishes of the Church (he identifies the founders of religious orders as such saints); Saint Therese is one and the other is the holy Cure of Ars, St Jean Vianney
Well, "Baal-Bizaar" is a heretic (wouldn't a Catholic want change a name that means "Baal protect the king")? To say saints were not "nourished within the bosom of the Church" is certainly blasphemous because the Church's sacraments are necessary to feed, protect, and save us.

One of our great Saints is named Balthasar. He was one of the three magi. Chill out, Geremia.
Von Balthasar is still a heretic.
Even First Communicants know hell isn't empty.
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#9
His nonsense about an "empty hell" makes me cringe.

Neopelagianus
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#10
(10-03-2014, 07:11 PM)Geremia Wrote:
(10-03-2014, 06:35 AM)EnglishConvert Wrote: Fr Von Balthasar, interestingly, in his book on St Therese identifies only two saints of the 19th century who are saints sent directly from God rather than being nourished within the bosom of the Church with God then 'bending' to the wishes of the Church (he identifies the founders of religious orders as such saints); Saint Therese is one and the other is the holy Cure of Ars, St Jean Vianney
Well, "Baal-Bizaar" is a heretic (wouldn't a Catholic want change a name that means "Baal protect the king")? To say saints were not "nourished within the bosom of the Church" is certainly blasphemous because the Church's sacraments are necessary to feed, protect, and save us.

Well yes, the reasonable hope all men are saved stuff is nonsense. But the rest of his stuff, from my understanding is perfectly sound. And I think, perhaps, you maybe misunderstand what Fr von Balthasar means with regard to being 'nourished in the bosom of the Church' (this is a paraphrase, by the way). Might I suggest you read his book. It was published in 1953 and contains both an Imprimatur and Nihil Obstat.
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