Latin will no longer be used as the official record of the Synod
#1
Via Rorate:

Quote:No more "propositiones". No more "relationes". No more anything. Latin will not be around, not even to ensure the precision of formulas and the exactness of final deliberations (and, presumably, the final report), unlike in any other of the previous assemblies of the Synod of Bishops.

"In a break with tradition, Pope Francis has decreed that the deliberations at the synod on the family are to be carried out in Italian rather than Latin.

Cardinal Péter Erdő of Hungary made the announcement during this morning opening session of the family synod at the Vatican, saying that Italian would be the “working language of the synod” at the behest of the pontiff. "
Reply
#2
new church new rules
Reply
#3
Perhaps the Synod decided to return to Greek? After all Greek preceded Latin as the canonical language.
(sarcasm levels at an all-time high)
Reply
#4
Since Latin is a dead language, its meanings are set in stone, there is no organic development,  it is the ideal language for binding documents, and the worst language for those who would like wiggle room.  And those people who want to bind are big meanies. 
Reply
#5
This may seem small, but it is really astonishing. Sure, Latin is originally from central Italy - but it became a universal tongue of academia and worship for many centuries. Its influence is felt beyond Europe. This action in the Synod today suddenly makes the Law of the Church to be expressed locally, in Italian, rather than in a universal tongue. Something about this makes me very uncomfortable.
Reply
#6
Agreed.  It is astonishing.  Latin is the language of the Church.  That a Synod can be recorded in a local (non-univeral, non-Catholic) language is just . . . not right.  I don't like this at all.
Reply
#7
Maybe they'll use Pig Latin, and they'll record everything on rubberbands, Etch-A-Sketches, and on white paper with lemon juice.

[Image: 594eaabd-c154-4bf7-9f57-70f7921d0d9d_zps5e6b6033.jpg]
Reply
#8
(10-07-2014, 03:52 AM)LaramieHirsch Wrote: Maybe they'll use Pig Latin, and they'll record everything on rubberbands, Etch-A-Sketches, and on white paper with lemon juice.
(10-07-2014, 12:41 AM)Landless Laborer Wrote: Since Latin is a dead language, its meanings are set in stone, there is no organic development,  it is the ideal language for binding documents, and the worst language for those who would like wiggle room.  And those people who want to bind are big meanies. 

They might as well....  :Hmm:
Reply
#9
Pope St John XXIII's Encyclical Veterum Sapientia

    "The Church's language must be not only universal but also immutable. Modern languages are liable to change, and no single one of them is superior to the others in authority. Thus if the truths of the Catholic Church were entrusted to an unspecified number of them, the meaning of these truths, varied as they are, would not be manifested to everyone with sufficient clarity and precision. There would, moreover, be no language which could serve as a common and constant norm by which to gauge the exact meaning of other renderings."

    "But Latin is indeed such a language. It is set and unchanging. it has long since ceased to be affected by those alterations in the meaning of words which are the normal result of daily, popular use. Certain Latin words, it is true, acquired new meanings as Christian teaching developed and needed to be explained and defended, but these new meanings have long since become accepted and firmly established."
Reply
#10
Well to be fair hardly anyone in the Church is familiar with Latin anymore, including, perhaps, the majority of bishops,cardinals and priests even within the Vatican. While the Council did not explicitly call for the Church to reduce Latin to the point of near irrelevance the Church did little to help continue to educate its clerics and its faithful in the Latin language.  Latin is making a comeback but it's really at the grassroots level, a bottom up affair.  Perhaps Francis is just facing the reality head on, namely, that most bishops today are as familiar with Latin today as most of us are with Mandarin Chinese or Sanskrit.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)