Did John Paul II replace Low Sunday with a different feast?
#1
I don't think he did. But I don't understand these matters.

I used to be a sceptic of the Divine Mercy Devotion, but now I support it, due to some positive advice from a traditional priest.

One of my original difficulties, and indeed, a stumbling block for many sceptics, is the institution of the feast of Divine Mercy.

Was this really an abrogation of low Sunday and the institution of a new feast?

Or was it simply to establish a new devotional focus for Low Sunday?
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#2
This is a bit of a "red herring" of a problem. What you're seeing is a conflict that does not exist, because of the change in calendars.

It's confusing, but the fact is:

John Paul II had no "Low Sunday" to replace. That Sunday was not given such a designation by the new Calendar of Paul VI in 1969. It was designated the "Sunday in the Octave of Easter". "Low Sunday" is the English-speaking world's traditional name for that Sunday. It was never official. JPII's Novus Ordo mindset - with its unnamed Sunday in the Octave - allowed him to impose any old name he wanted.

What we call "Low Sunday" is properly known in the West as "Dominica in Albis" - "White Sunday", when the ancient newly-baptized neophytes removed their white robes after wearing them for a week. It has been called "Thomas Sunday" in the East for a long time too.

"Divine Mercy' is appropriate to any Sunday, but there's nothing wrong with it being on so-called Low Sunday.
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#3
I don't know about your question regarding the Low Sunday feast, I don't even understand what that entailed prior to Divine Mercy. However I do trust in the Divine Mercy. Have you read the book? It is a very powerful devotion meant for our times. Pray it for dying loved ones. In my own personal experience, I believe it had been an extremely powerful prayer for a lady I knew, God rest her soul.
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#4
(10-07-2014, 07:40 PM)Heorot Wrote: This is a bit of a "red herring" of a problem. What you're seeing is a conflict that does not exist, because of the change in calendars.

It's confusing, but the fact is:

John Paul II had no "Low Sunday" to replace. That Sunday was not given such a designation by the new Calendar of Paul VI in 1969. It was designated the "Sunday in the Octave of Easter". "Low Sunday" is the English-speaking world's traditional name for that Sunday. It was never official. JPII's Novus Ordo mindset - with its unnamed Sunday in the Octave - allowed him to impose any old name he wanted.

What we call "Low Sunday" is properly known in the West as "Dominica in Albis" - "White Sunday", when the ancient newly-baptized neophytes removed their white robes after wearing them for a week. It has been called "Thomas Sunday" in the East for a long time too.

"Divine Mercy' is appropriate to any Sunday, but there's nothing wrong with it being on so-called Low Sunday.

This has confused me more. Did John Paul II designate the Sunday in the Octave of Easter to the Divine Mercy only in the Novus Ordo, or could Catholics commemorate the Divine Mercy in the 1962 rite as well? 
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#5
(10-07-2014, 08:27 PM)Miles Immaculatae Wrote: This has confused me more. Did John Paul II designate the Sunday in the Octave of Easter to the Divine Mercy only in the Novus Ordo, or could Catholics commemorate the Divine Mercy in the 1962 rite as well?

Novus Ordo's "Sunday in the Octave of Easter" is pretty much the same designation as the Old Rite: "Sunday After Easter". Names like "Dominica in Albis", "Low Sunday", "Divine Mercy Sunday", and "Thomas Sunday" are pretty much non-liturgical designations.

Technically, I don't believe this Sunday has any special readings or prayers for "Divine Mercy" as an event or feast. JPII just calls it the Sunday of Mercy. It may be a designation he applied to the day as a sort of "theme". Think of the fact that the "theme" of the Second Sunday in Lent is always the Transfiguration of Our Lord, although the Transfiguration's proper Feast Day is always August 6. This is similar, in my opnion.

As Benedict XVI defined in Summorum Pontificum and its clarification-statement, the Calendar of the old form of Mass is to remain as it did in 1962. No changes are to be allowed, even in terms of feasts of Saints. This applies to the sacred paschal mysteries of the Lord as well. Unless a Pope changes the Law by invalidating Summorum Pontificum, only the Novus Ordo Calendar can be changed.
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#6
I don't understand the issue either. I attend a Latin Mass parish, 1962 liturgy and calendar. Problem solved. All the rest is novelty and whim. Distractions from the focus of the True Faith.
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#7
No.  It specifically says, "or Divine Mercy Sunday."

Or.
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#8
None of the readings or other propers changed, just "or Divine Mercy Sunday" was added to the title of the Sunday in the Missal. That's it. In the 2002 Missale Romanum, the Sunday is called: "DOMINICA II PASCHAE, seu de divina Misericordia."
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#9
Just to reiterate what others have said: the readings at Mass are the same in the Novus Ordo and Latin rite on that second Sunday of Easter. The Lord breathes on the apostles and gives us the sacrament of Penance and Thomas replaces his doubts with faith when the Lord invites him to put his hands in his wounds. You can call it "Low Sunday" or "Bright Sunday" or "The Octave of Easter" or "Divine Mercy Sunday." Also, any devotions attached specifically to Divine Mercy are extra liturgical and not part of the Mass.

It's interesting to note that St. Augustine called the eight days of Easter "the compendium of mercy." Our Lord must have known what he was doing by asking for the Octave of Easter to be associated with his mercy (if the private revelation is true and I believe that it is).
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#10
Indulgences have also been granted for that day:

And so the Supreme Pontiff, motivated by an ardent desire to foster in Christians this devotion to Divine Mercy as much as possible in the hope of offering great spiritual fruit to the faithful, in the Audience granted on 13 June 2002, to those Responsible for the Apostolic Penitentiary, granted the following Indulgences:

a plenary indulgence, granted under the usual conditions (sacramental confession, Eucharistic communion and prayer for the intentions of Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday, in any church or chapel, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, take part in the prayers and devotions held in honour of Divine Mercy, or who, in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament exposed or reserved in the tabernacle, recite the Our Father and the Creed, adding a devout prayer to the merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!");

A partial indulgence, granted to the faithful who, at least with a contrite heart, pray to the merciful Lord Jesus a legitimately approved invocation.

For those who cannot go to church or the seriously ill

In addition, sailors working on the vast expanse of the sea; the countless brothers and sisters, whom the disasters of war, political events, local violence and other such causes have been driven out of their homeland; the sick and those who nurse them, and all who for a just cause cannot leave their homes or who carry out an activity for the community which cannot be postponed, may obtain a plenary indulgence on Divine Mercy Sunday, if totally detesting any sin, as has been said before, and with the intention of fulfilling as soon as possible the three usual conditions, will recite the Our Father and the Creed before a devout image of Our Merciful Lord Jesus and, in addition, pray a devout invocation to the Merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you).

If it is impossible that people do even this, on the same day they may obtain the Plenary Indulgence if with a spiritual intention they are united with those carrying out the prescribed practice for obtaining the Indulgence in the usual way and offer to the Merciful Lord a prayer and the sufferings of their illness and the difficulties of their lives, with the resolution to accomplish as soon as possible the three conditions prescribed to obtain the plenary indulgence.

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/tribun...ii_en.html
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