Revivals and Great awakenings
#1
From protestant/american history standpoint, you had great awakenings, you have revivals, and after 9-11 some folk started going to church, only to drift off...

so,  church life is high, etc  starts the dip spiritually, etc  then something happens it ticks back up...

certainly in Catholicism there seems to be periods of plenty, followed by periods of despair/destruction/etc...

do catholics use the term or have a term for "revival"

"Does the CC have a term for widespread revival"  or what catholic prayer is the equivalent of praying - in protestant terms- for revival?

thats all i can offer as the question. I dont really understand the point of the question, except she says "ive been praying for revival for 20 years"
Reply
#2
There was a sort of Catholic Revival in England in the 1800's, with people like Bl. John Henry Newman and G.K. Chesterton.  Around this time, the Catholic hierarchy was reestablished there as well.  It didn't look exactly the same, of course, but there was definitely something going on there.  There are also cases where individual parishes, dioceses, religious orders, and the like have been failing and experienced a renewal.  Saint John Cantius in Chicago is a good example.  I can't think of any recent examples of a "Catholic revival."
Reply
#3
(10-26-2014, 04:29 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: There was a sort of Catholic Revival in England in the 1800's, with people like Bl. John Henry Newman and G.K. Chesterton.  Around this time, the Catholic hierarchy was reestablished there as well.  It didn't look exactly the same, of course, but there was definitely something going on there.  There are also cases where individual parishes, dioceses, religious orders, and the like have been failing and experienced a renewal.  Saint John Cantius in Chicago is a good example.  I can't think of any recent examples of a "Catholic revival."

Don't forget Pugin.
Reply
#4
Yes, Pugin, Faber, Newman, and others.  The English Gothic Revival architectural style, for which Pugin is known, is definitely important and reflects a revival of the Faith in that area of the world. 

I didn't mention him because I feel there has been somewhat of a renewal of Catholic tradition in the US, although it has not come by way of the "establishment" church.  Architecture depends on that "establishment," and the enthusiasm for tradition has largely come from the laity.  People are not as likely to donate lots of money to build beautiful churches if they're afraid they're just going to lose them in a game of ecclesiastical politics.  Because of this and the fact that traditional Catholicism is more counter-cultural than it has, perhaps, ever been before, architecture is not going to reflect that renewal of tradition (at least not yet).

Building churches like those of the Gothic revival of the 1800's would be too expensive for many traditional Catholic groups.  Because of this, the renewed love for tradition hasn't really been reflected too well in architecture.  Sure, a traditional Catholic church can be made to look as beautiful as possible, but it probably wouldn't be anywhere near what churches once were.  The people with the kind of money it would take to build one (millions and millions of dollars) don't spend it on that.  The money seems to be in the "establishment" church, and they seem to want to make the Faith look cheap.

There's no reason a Latin-rite Catholic church cannot be every bit as ornate as an Eastern Orthodox one (only in 3-D- statues instead of icons).  There's no reason a church can't be built to be as awe-inspiring as the great Cathedrals of the middle ages or even beautiful, traditional designs of more recent times.  Unfortunately, because of cost, that's unattainable right now for most- those who could do it won't do it.  Iimagine what the cathedral in Los Angeles COULD have been had it been designed with tradition in mind.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)