A Question about Mass as it pertains to Salvation
#1
A friend of mine who has fallen away from the Church posed this question to me:

      "If salvation is obtained through accepting Christ as our Savior,
      does attendance at Mass really have any significance as to
      whether or not we achieve salvation?"

My first thought was to counter by saying that we are saved by Christ's Grace, not just by accepting Him as our Savior. At present, I have not given him a reply (he asked me via text message) and would like to have a concrete answer for him soon. I lack the full personal knowledge to answer this question: all useful information and assistance in providing my friend with an answer - one that might hopefully help in drawing him back to the Church - is greatly appreciated; thank you.
Reply
#2
Well, communion gives grace which is necessary for salvation. Jesus says that unless we eat his flesh and drink his blood we will hav no life. Secondly he commanded it. You have to keep his commandments to be saved. The new covenant has many similarities to the old covenant because it is prefigured. The Jews had to go to Jersalem for certain feasts on certain days, as well as offer sacrifices for sin. There's a lot more I can say here. Notice that the first few commandments of the Decalogue pertain to love of God and the remainder to love of neighbor. Many Protestants believe that Jesus abolished the law instead of fulfilling it and bringing it to perfection.
Reply
#3
(11-04-2014, 02:47 AM)AndreM73 Wrote: A friend of mine who has fallen away from the Church posed this question to me:

      "If salvation is obtained through accepting Christ as our Savior,
      does attendance at Mass really have any significance as to
      whether or not we achieve salvation?"

My first thought was to counter by saying that we are saved by Christ's Grace, not just by accepting Him as our Savior. At present, I have not given him a reply (he asked me via text message) and would like to have a concrete answer for him soon. I lack the full personal knowledge to answer this question: all useful information and assistance in providing my friend with an answer - one that might hopefully help in drawing him back to the Church - is greatly appreciated; thank you.
Yes it does for a number of reasons. First of all if your friend really and truly accepted Christ his behaviour would be different. Instead of complaining about the Church he would be going to mass every day. The mass is the memorial of Christ's death on the Cross. True friends of Christ would want to be there every day if possible.
Another reason is that if he sincerely accepts Christ then he asscpts his word. In hte Bible we see that Christ established his Church, the Catholic church. He said to Peter, "You are the stone, and upon this stone I will build my Church. and the gates of Hell will not prevail. This church established by Christ has some very simple rules. One of these rules is the attendance at mass evey Sunday. This is an important way to demonstrate fidelity to Christ. Your friend may not be erudite. He may not have the opportunity to make long speeches about his love for Christ, but by attending Mass every Sunday he is telling the whole world of his love for Christ and he doesn't have to say a word. Other people may see him at mass and be ensouraged in their attendance.
Those who truly accept Christ don't just say the words like they are some kind of magic words learned like a parrot. They live those words every day of their lives. And an important aspect of this life in unity with Christ is attendance t Holy Mass.
Reply
#4
You can't accept Christ as Savior, but refuse to worship in the way He has commanded us for the good of our salvation. It's a contradiction.  In general, it makes no sense to accept Christ as Savior but refuse to do what He says we must to be saved.
Reply
#5
You fellows have all taken it to be that this fellow has become a Protestant. I took it to mean he has become entirely irreligious. Clarification from the OP on this point would be appreciated.
Reply
#6
As per Dirigible's request, I would like to clarify that my friend has become irreligious, not Protestant. That being said, he does attempt to put on a somewhat Catholic front (somewhat being the key word). Thank you!
Reply
#7
(11-04-2014, 12:08 PM)AndreM73 Wrote: As per Dirigible's request, I would like to clarify that my friend has become irreligious, not Protestant. That being said, he does attempt to put on a somewhat Catholic front (somewhat being the key word). Thank you!

I'm not the best one to give an answer here, but I think a simple answer will work better than a complicated one; prayer and worship are important for "attuning" ourselves to God and our fellow Christians, and because the Church is a body with many parts, not a collection of individuals, these are done together in the form of the liturgy, as one, according to the traditions that come to us from our forebears in the faith, putting us in a real communion with them across time. As well as that, church in general and the liturgy in particular is where we receive the sacraments, which are important means of receiving grace.

It's not enough to think "all I have to do is believe and then I'm fine"; that's attempting to do as little as possible, which shows insincerity of faith. A truly faithful person would want to go above and beyond the bare minimum out of love for God and the Church.
Reply
#8
Nope. Blessed Scotus was the beginning of the end for philosophy.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)