Questions about evangelizing
#1
There is a male acquaintance I know who is not too much older than me. He recently told me (quite randomly) that he was divorced a few years ago, has a young teenage daughter he no longer sees, and that despite all the counseling he and his ex-wife received they still went through the divorce. He is not a Catholic, not even a Christian. Judging by the story he told me, it's highly possible he didn't grow in a household environment where Christianity (or any religion) had a presence. While he is a very charismatic and lively individual, I sensed some masked, deep pain when he told me this.

I am wondering, how do we go about sharing  with divorced individuals the Catholic faith? Or just sharing Jesus first in general? While this is an acquaintance of mine I am wondering if some people on this forum have befriended individuals who have gone through a divorce (or divorces); I have no experience with the vocation of marriage or divorce. I suppose my experience is different because I didn't know this person was previously married.

I will continue to pray for him but I really think someone needs to share with him the love of Jesus and I'm not quite sure how to do that. ??? I'm not very good at evangelizing and I realize the Holy Spirit plays a huge part in conversion, but I'm wondering how I could plant some seeds.
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#2
The fact that he is divorced doesn't prevent him from entering the Church.
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#3
(11-06-2014, 12:26 AM)Poche Wrote: The fact that he is divorced doesn't prevent him from entering the Church.

Obviously, but unless you already "buy in" to Catholic doctrine, your impression is that you can only be a "second class" or "partial" Catholic. If you remarry, you can't receive Communion, so you might ask what's the point of joining a religion if you can't partake in its most sacred ritual? That requires a convincing answer.
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#4
We all had baggage before turing our lives over to God. Let God handle all that, because you really can't. I think the baggage part is the work of the Holy Ghost--He deals with that. If he accepts you as his friend, just be his friend and be your Catholic self and be real with him. If he's open to hearing you, share from your heart what the faith means to you. Pray for him.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#5
If neither the husband not the wife was baptized validity at the time, it was only a natural marriage, not a sacramental marriage, and as such is subject to dissolution under certain circumstances, not annulment, under what is known as Pauline Privilege, or Petrine Privilege of one party was baptized. This should, I think, free him up if he converts and allow him to marry another believer.

Barring that, there are other options, which I cannot strictly endorse. But people die all the time, and death dissolves even a sacramental marriage. One cannot kill a spouse, of course, in order to remarry: that would constitute a canonical impediment (crimen) to remarriage, subject only to dispensation by the Pope himself. But killing the spouse for some other reason, unrelated to remarriage, would be a grave sin but would not be a canonical impediment.

Perhaps, though, a man could hypothetically first kill his spouse, then undergo baptism. In this case (I could be mistaken), I don't think the previous crime would constitute an impediment to remarriage. It would also not be necessary to ever confess the murder, seeing as it would have occurred prior to one's baptism.
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#6
(11-06-2014, 02:05 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: If neither the husband not the wife was baptized validity at the time, it was only a natural marriage, not a sacramental marriage, and as such is subject to dissolution under certain circumstances, not annulment, under what is known as Pauline Privilege, or Petrine Privilege of one party was baptized. This should, I think, free him up if he converts and allow him to marry another believer.

Barring that, there are other options, which I cannot strictly endorse. But people die all the time, and death dissolves even a sacramental marriage. One cannot kill a spouse, of course, in order to remarry: that would constitute a canonical impediment (crimen) to remarriage, subject only to dispensation by the Pope himself. But killing the spouse for some other reason, unrelated to remarriage, would be a grave sin but would not be a canonical impediment.

Perhaps, though, a man could hypothetically first kill his spouse, then undergo baptism. In this case (I could be mistaken), I don't think the previous crime would constitute an impediment to remarriage. It would also not be necessary to ever confess the murder, seeing as it would have occurred prior to one's baptism.

This thread took a strange turn.
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#7
(11-06-2014, 02:13 PM)Dirigible Wrote:
(11-06-2014, 02:05 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: If neither the husband not the wife was baptized validity at the time, it was only a natural marriage, not a sacramental marriage, and as such is subject to dissolution under certain circumstances, not annulment, under what is known as Pauline Privilege, or Petrine Privilege of one party was baptized. This should, I think, free him up if he converts and allow him to marry another believer.

Barring that, there are other options, which I cannot strictly endorse. But people die all the time, and death dissolves even a sacramental marriage. One cannot kill a spouse, of course, in order to remarry: that would constitute a canonical impediment (crimen) to remarriage, subject only to dispensation by the Pope himself. But killing the spouse for some other reason, unrelated to remarriage, would be a grave sin but would not be a canonical impediment.

Perhaps, though, a man could hypothetically first kill his spouse, then undergo baptism. In this case (I could be mistaken), I don't think the previous crime would constitute an impediment to remarriage. It would also not be necessary to ever confess the murder, seeing as it would have occurred prior to one's baptism.

This thread took a strange turn.

Indeed.. Scary  :O
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#8
I don't even know what's happening right now......... ???
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#9
It was not an endorsement of such crime. I am only speculating about every possible course of action as it relates to canon law with respect to ending a marriage and remarrying. My main thrust was the remark about Pauline Privilege and Petrine Privilege, depending on which is applicable. We need to distinguish between natural marriage and sacramental marriage. Unlike a sacramental marriage, Catholic teaching allows for the dissolution of valid (not null) natural marriages in certain circumstances. Another example would be in the case of a polygamist entering the church: he must keep only one wife, ideally the first wife, and dismiss the others. The children issuing from of the other marriages, provided they were conceived prior to the dismissal of the spouses, are still legitimate offspring, not bastards as far as canon law is concerned.

Murder and remarriage is an ancient literary trope, is historically significant, and still (tragically) persists in some tribal, honor-bound societies as a marriage strategy, where divorce is either impossible or shameful. It deserves some discussion, if criteria for Pauline and Petrine Privilege are not met, and if the marriage was contracted without any impediments that would indicate nullity. As I pointed out, the Catholic perspective is that murder in order to remarry constitutes a canonical impediment to sacramental marriage, and dispensation must be granted by the Holy Father himself, and documentary evidence suggests that dispensation has never been granted in such cases.
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#10
Good gravy, Cyriacus.  :O
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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