So we sang "A Mighty Fortress" at church yesterday
#11
(11-10-2014, 04:16 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: Not too long ago I was checking out a gift shop at a local parish when I heard the Introit, et, I mean "entrance song" Pure Imagination from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. I almost expected Gene Wilder to be the priest in purple vestments proceeding down the isle towards the butcher block table while being trailed by cartwheeling Oompa Loompas.
Wait a few weeks. Purple is the color of Advent.
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#12
(11-10-2014, 09:05 PM)Cetil Wrote: I heard "A Mighty Fortress" many times in Catholic churches going back to the seventies I guess. I didn't even know it was Lutheran until the eighties.

C.
Wasn't the author Martin Luther?
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#13
(11-10-2014, 03:47 PM)dark lancer Wrote: Yep.

I think our organist is a troll.
Shouldn't it  be our organist is an opportunity for conversion?
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#14
(11-10-2014, 11:34 PM)DJR Wrote:
(11-10-2014, 09:05 PM)Cetil Wrote: I heard "A Mighty Fortress" many times in Catholic churches going back to the seventies I guess. I didn't even know it was Lutheran until the eighties. C.

The all-time number 1 "hymn" in the U.S. immediately after the council was... Kumbaya.


Even until now I don't know what Kumbaya means...

Neopelagianus
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#15
(11-10-2014, 11:34 PM)DJR Wrote:
(11-10-2014, 09:05 PM)Cetil Wrote: I heard "A Mighty Fortress" many times in Catholic churches going back to the seventies I guess. I didn't even know it was Lutheran until the eighties. C.

The all-time number 1 "hymn" in the U.S. immediately after the council was... Kumbaya.

That calls to mind a funny story. I was once at a Mass in rural North Carolina and there was no resident priest and the one the diocese sent had a kind of hippie appearance to him but his Mass wasn't too bad except he asked everyone to sing Kumbaya for a recessional but all he got was blank looks because no one knew it! His mouth dropped open and me, I just wanted to shout "I love this town! " But of course I didn't.

C.
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#16
Why not just use the hymns from the Divine Office in a heiratic vernacular at the Novus a Ordo,or better yet, sing them in Latin? There are hundreds of doctrinally sound hymns in our Roman Catholic patrimony that would be perfectly suited to the liturgy and they are freely available.  Some go back millennia.


http://www.preces-latinae.org/index.htm    This site has a ton of information on various prayers and hymnsin our patrimony.
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#17
(11-11-2014, 11:26 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: Why not just use the hymns from the Divine Office in a heiratic vernacular at the Novus a Ordo,or better yet, sing them in Latin? There are hundreds of doctrinally sound hymns in our Roman Catholic patrimony that would be perfectly suited to the liturgy and they are freely available.  Some go back millennia.


http://www.preces-latinae.org/index.htm    This site has a ton of information on various prayers and hymnsin our patrimony.

I take it you haven't met too many choir directors, they can be rather ruthless individuals who wield way too much power in my experience.     
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#18
(11-11-2014, 01:07 PM)AntoniusMaximus Wrote:
(11-11-2014, 11:26 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: Why not just use the hymns from the Divine Office in a heiratic vernacular at the Novus a Ordo,or better yet, sing them in Latin? There are hundreds of doctrinally sound hymns in our Roman Catholic patrimony that would be perfectly suited to the liturgy and they are freely available.  Some go back millennia.


http://www.preces-latinae.org/index.htm    This site has a ton of information on various prayers and hymnsin our patrimony.

I take it you haven't met too many choir directors, they can be rather ruthless individuals who wield way too much power in my experience.   

Boy, ain't that the truth?!?!?  And I've only met a very few of them!  Thankfully, in the Eastern Church this problem is not quite as huge.
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#19
(11-11-2014, 01:07 PM)AntoniusMaximus Wrote:
(11-11-2014, 11:26 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: Why not just use the hymns from the Divine Office in a heiratic vernacular at the Novus a Ordo,or better yet, sing them in Latin? There are hundreds of doctrinally sound hymns in our Roman Catholic patrimony that would be perfectly suited to the liturgy and they are freely available.  Some go back millennia.


http://www.preces-latinae.org/index.htm    This site has a ton of information on various prayers and hymnsin our patrimony.

I take it you haven't met too many choir directors, they can be rather ruthless individuals who wield way too much power in my experience.   

I read the CCWatershed Blog frequently and so I've heard that's the case but I haven't had any reason to talk to choir directors so I've no first hand experience. There should be some uniformity in the types of hymns used, I mean, in this town each of the three parishes is totally different in how they offer Mass and what hymns are used. We have the Willy Wonka and electric guitar parish whose "worship space" looks like the set of a Star Trek movie, a Marty Haugen and Dan Schutte parish with Tambourines and a tone deaf choir director who chooses the cheesiest and most sentimental drivel possible, and the college parish where the Mass Propers are almost always used and there is a degree of reverence.
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#20
(11-11-2014, 11:03 AM)Cetil Wrote: That calls to mind a funny story. I was once at a Mass in rural North Carolina and there was no resident priest and the one the diocese sent had a kind of hippie appearance to him but his Mass wasn't too bad except he asked everyone to sing Kumbaya for a recessional but all he got was blank looks because no one knew it! His mouth dropped open and me, I just wanted to shout "I love this town! " But of course I didn't. C.

Actually I don't mind a lot of these types of songs, Kumbaya, He's Got the Whole World in His Hands, et cetera, as long as they're in the right venue:  around a campfire roasting marshmallows.  At Mass, absolutely not.

I can remember going to Mass in North Carolina in the 70s while visiting relatives.  I vividly remember that Mass, but two things stand out in my memory: 

1.  The priest gave his sermon while sitting on the altar/table, swinging his legs like a little kid would do.  Prior to that time, I had never seen anything like that done by a priest. 

2.  The priest read a letter from the bishop.  In the letter, the bishop stated that it was inappropriate for women to wear pantsuits to Mass.


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