Marriage according to Pope Francis
#1
Pope Francis reflected on sexual complementarity within marriage in an address to a conference sponsored by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

The “complementarity of man and woman” is “at the root of marriage and family, which is the first school where we learn to appreciate our own and others’ gifts, and where we begin to acquire the arts of living together,” he said in his November 17 address.

“When we speak of complementarity between man and woman in this context, let us not confuse that term with the simplistic idea that all the roles and relations of the two sexes are fixed in a single, static pattern,” he continued.

“Complementarity will take many forms as each man and woman brings his or her distinctive contributions to their marriage and to the formation of their children -- his or her personal richness, personal charisma.”

Noting that “marriage and the family are in crisis,” Pope Francis lamented the “culture of the temporary, in which more and more people are simply giving up on marriage as a public commitment. This revolution in manners and morals has often flown the flag of freedom, but in fact it has brought spiritual and material devastation to countless human beings, especially the poorest and most vulnerable.”

He added:


I urge you to lift up yet another truth about marriage: that permanent commitment to solidarity, fidelity, and fruitful love responds to the deepest longings of the human heart. Let us bear in mind especially the young people, who represent our future. It is important that they do not give themselves over to the poisonous mentality of the temporary, but rather be revolutionaries with the courage to seek true and lasting love, going against the common pattern: this must be done.

With regard to this I want to say one thing: Let us not fall into the trap of being qualified by ideological concepts. Family is an anthropological fact - a socially and culturally related fact. We cannot qualify it with concepts of an ideological nature, that are relevant only in a single moment of history, and then pass by. We can't speak today of a conservative notion of family or a progressive notion of family: Family is family! It can't be qualified by ideological notions.

http://www.catholicculture.org/news/head...ryid=23249
Reply
#2
Did he just say marriage is between one man and one woman ?
   
    :Hmm:
Reply
#3
Sadly, none of this will affect two related questions:

1.  Francis wants to change the pastoral practice of the Church whilst insisting, incorrectly, that this will not imply a change of doctrine.  Whatever any synod says, the pastoral practice has already changed in many places, and continues to change.  So the catechism says one thing, and the actual church acts and believes according to another doctrine.  This already true of contraception, of course. 

2.  Francis is keen to see unnatural relationships given their own legal status which is, before the law, equal with marriage.  He is absolutely opposed to calling these unions "marriage."  For this reason some appear to be confused about his agenda, but he has been perfectly clear, if he is read on face value and not through some filter or other.  He condemns "gay marriage" and approves "gay unions".
Reply
#4
(11-18-2014, 04:06 AM)tucherb Wrote: Did he just say marriage is between one man and one woman ?
   
    :Hmm:
yes
:) :) :)
Reply
#5
.  Francis wants to change the pastoral practice of the Church whilst insisting, incorrectly, that this will not imply a change of doctrine.  Whatever any synod says, the pastoral practice has already changed in many places, and continues to change.  So the catechism says one thing, and the actual church acts and believes according to another doctrine.  This already true of contraception, of course. 

I have never heard Pope Francis say that artificial contraception was legitimate.
Reply
#6
Pope Francis caused some confusion and disappointment on Monday for those who been holding out hope regarding his stance on same-sex marriage and LGBT equality. That’s when, during a speech at the Complementarity of Man and Woman conference in Rome, the Pope made the following declaration to a room packed with religious leaders: “Children have a right to grow up in a family with a father and a mother.”

However, at the end of his speech, the pope announced plans to make his first visit to the United States in September, where he will attend Philadelphia’s World Meeting of the Families. That Catholic conference, held to strengthen family units worldwide, will ironically host many gay and lesbian families.

Although the pope has always maintained that “matrimony is between a man and woman,” and has stated his opposition to same-sex adoption (even being “shocked” by the notion, according to a local paper in Malta), LGBT activists have maintained hope regarding his opinions: He has indicated that he would support some civil unions in the event that one partner needed medical care, for example, and has warned against the church becoming “obsessed” with gay issues.

“On the one hand, Pope Francis is a hopeful pope — he doesn’t come from Vatican bureaucracy, he entered priesthood later than most men, he’s grounded in his ministry, and seems comfortable discussing gay issues,” Marianne Duddy-Burke, executive director of Dignity USA, an organization for LGBT Catholics, tells Yahoo Parenting. “It’s hard to put a traditional label on him. However, he is not as focused on social issues, such as abortion, gay rights, and contraception, and that’s not in line with how the world is evolving.”

Regardless, the media erupted with speculation about whether Monday’s remarks indicated that the pope was supporting traditional families or simply emphasizing their primary place in society.

Pope Francis, who has been dubbed the “cool pope,” already has a history of causing a stir. Back in January during a service at the Sistine Chapel, he encouraged all mothers to breastfeed in public — even in church— saying of babies, “If they are hungry, mothers, let them eat, no worries, because here, they are the main focus.” He’s also acknowledged the importance of female religious leaders, saying that the church should “investigate further the role of women” and that “the feminine genius is needed wherever we make important decisions.”

And despite his seemingly rockstar image — the former nightclub bouncer has nearly 5 million Twitter followers and, in 2013, Time magazine named him “Person of the Year” — Pope Francis leads a simple life. He resides in the Vatican guesthouse instead of a fancy papal apartment, and he drives a 1984 Renault instead of using a chauffeur. Earlier this week, it was announced that three showers for homeless people would be installed in public restrooms in Vatican City. And the pope recently made headlines for inviting “Godmother of Punk” Patti Smith to perform at the official Vatican Christmas Concert in December — and she accepted.

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, who is retiring due to his cancer diagnosis, acknowledged on Monday that the pope has a history of creating confusion about his opinions. “Does he not realize the repercussions? Perhaps he doesn’t,” Cardinal George told the Catholic website the Crux. “I don’t know whether he’s conscious of all the consequences of some of the things he’s said and done that raise doubts in people’s minds.”

Duddy-Burke agrees. “No one really knows the Pope’s stance on gay marriage,” she says. “It’s disappointing and confusing, however unfortunately consistent with what we’ve been hearing from the Vatican for the past 30 years.”

https://www.yahoo.com/parenting/the-pope...72772.html

How many times does Pope Francis have to say, "Marriage is between one man and one woman for people to understand the Pope's stance on "gay" marriage?
Reply
#7
Conservatives like to recall this:

"In June 2010, a month before Argentina legalized same-sex marriage, [then-Cardinal] Bergoglio wrote a letter to the Carmelite Nuns of the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires in which he stated that a marriage equality bill before the South American nation’s legislature was the work of the devil and that fight against gay marriage is 'a war of God.'"

So he was against "marriage equality" as presented to the Argentine parliament.  I think he still is, based upon what I have read.  He's in favour of something else - a kind of eighth (secular) sacrament, "civil unions" which are not marriage.  This will meet the demands of the world, and avoid a particular doctrinal clash - that is, the definition of marriage.  He's side-stepping that problem.

Quote:http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2014/03/05...?hpt=hp_t2

Francis reaffirmed the Catholic Church's opposition to gay marriage on Wednesday, but suggested in a newspaper interview that it could support some types of civil unions.

The Pope reiterated the church's longstanding teaching that "marriage is between a man and a woman." However, he said, "We have to look at different cases and evaluate them in their variety."

States, for instance, justify civil unions as a way to provide economic security to cohabitating couples, the Pope said in a wide-ranging interview published Wednesday in Corriere della Sera, an Italian daily. State-sanctioned unions are thus driven by the need to ensure rights like access to health care, Francis added.

A number of Catholic bishops have supported civil unions for same-sex couples as an alternative to marriage, including Pope Francis when he was Archbishop of Buenos Aires in 2010, according to reports in National Catholic Reporter and The New York Times.

There is plenty of very clear evidence for this distinction.  So this is his doctrinal agenda, to be pursued chiefly by actions and significant gestures.

He's only confusing if you don't read him carefully.  He knows what he believes and he says it clearly enough. 
Reply
#8
(11-19-2014, 08:38 PM)John Lane Wrote: Conservatives like to recall this:

"In June 2010, a month before Argentina legalized same-sex marriage, [then-Cardinal] Bergoglio wrote a letter to the Carmelite Nuns of the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires in which he stated that a marriage equality bill before the South American nation’s legislature was the work of the devil and that fight against gay marriage is 'a war of God.'"

So he was against "marriage equality" as presented to the Argentine parliament.  I think he still is, based upon what I have read.  He's in favour of something else - a kind of eighth (secular) sacrament, "civil unions" which are not marriage.  This will meet the demands of the world, and avoid a particular doctrinal clash - that is, the definition of marriage.  He's side-stepping that problem.

Quote:http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2014/03/05...?hpt=hp_t2

Francis reaffirmed the Catholic Church's opposition to gay marriage on Wednesday, but suggested in a newspaper interview that it could support some types of civil unions.

The Pope reiterated the church's longstanding teaching that "marriage is between a man and a woman." However, he said, "We have to look at different cases and evaluate them in their variety."

States, for instance, justify civil unions as a way to provide economic security to cohabitating couples, the Pope said in a wide-ranging interview published Wednesday in Corriere della Sera, an Italian daily. State-sanctioned unions are thus driven by the need to ensure rights like access to health care, Francis added.

A number of Catholic bishops have supported civil unions for same-sex couples as an alternative to marriage, including Pope Francis when he was Archbishop of Buenos Aires in 2010, according to reports in National Catholic Reporter and The New York Times.

There is plenty of very clear evidence for this distinction.  So this is his doctrinal agenda, to be pursued chiefly by actions and significant gestures.

He's only confusing if you don't read him carefully.  He knows what he believes and he says it clearly enough.

Do we have an actual quote of Pope Francis saying the Church could support certain types of civil unions?  The article said he he said this in his most recent interview, but it gave no quote.  I would think if he actually said it, that quote would be headline news across the world.  Not to mention the title of a new FE thread.

Any quotes?  Any hard proof?
Reply
#9
(11-19-2014, 03:24 AM)Poche Wrote: Pope Francis caused some confusion and disappointment on Monday for those who been holding out hope regarding his stance on same-sex marriage and LGBT equality. That’s when, during a speech at the Complementarity of Man and Woman conference in Rome, the Pope made the following declaration to a room packed with religious leaders: “Children have a right to grow up in a family with a father and a mother.”

However, at the end of his speech, the pope announced plans to make his first visit to the United States in September, where he will attend Philadelphia’s World Meeting of the Families. That Catholic conference, held to strengthen family units worldwide, will ironically host many gay and lesbian families.

Although the pope has always maintained that “matrimony is between a man and woman,” and has stated his opposition to same-sex adoption (even being “shocked” by the notion, according to a local paper in Malta), LGBT activists have maintained hope regarding his opinions: He has indicated that he would support some civil unions in the event that one partner needed medical care, for example, and has warned against the church becoming “obsessed” with gay issues.

“On the one hand, Pope Francis is a hopeful pope — he doesn’t come from Vatican bureaucracy, he entered priesthood later than most men, he’s grounded in his ministry, and seems comfortable discussing gay issues,” Marianne Duddy-Burke, executive director of Dignity USA, an organization for LGBT Catholics, tells Yahoo Parenting. “It’s hard to put a traditional label on him. However, he is not as focused on social issues, such as abortion, gay rights, and contraception, and that’s not in line with how the world is evolving.”

Regardless, the media erupted with speculation about whether Monday’s remarks indicated that the pope was supporting traditional families or simply emphasizing their primary place in society.

Pope Francis, who has been dubbed the “cool pope,” already has a history of causing a stir. Back in January during a service at the Sistine Chapel, he encouraged all mothers to breastfeed in public — even in church— saying of babies, “If they are hungry, mothers, let them eat, no worries, because here, they are the main focus.” He’s also acknowledged the importance of female religious leaders, saying that the church should “investigate further the role of women” and that “the feminine genius is needed wherever we make important decisions.”

And despite his seemingly rockstar image — the former nightclub bouncer has nearly 5 million Twitter followers and, in 2013, Time magazine named him “Person of the Year” — Pope Francis leads a simple life. He resides in the Vatican guesthouse instead of a fancy papal apartment, and he drives a 1984 Renault instead of using a chauffeur. Earlier this week, it was announced that three showers for homeless people would be installed in public restrooms in Vatican City. And the pope recently made headlines for inviting “Godmother of Punk” Patti Smith to perform at the official Vatican Christmas Concert in December — and she accepted.

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, who is retiring due to his cancer diagnosis, acknowledged on Monday that the pope has a history of creating confusion about his opinions. “Does he not realize the repercussions? Perhaps he doesn’t,” Cardinal George told the Catholic website the Crux. “I don’t know whether he’s conscious of all the consequences of some of the things he’s said and done that raise doubts in people’s minds.”

Duddy-Burke agrees. “No one really knows the Pope’s stance on gay marriage,” she says. “It’s disappointing and confusing, however unfortunately consistent with what we’ve been hearing from the Vatican for the past 30 years.”

https://www.yahoo.com/parenting/the-pope...72772.html

How many times does Pope Francis have to say, "Marriage is between one man and one woman for people to understand the Pope's stance on "gay" marriage?

This Duddy-Burke chick seems to have a bad case of liberal selective hearing.
"Punishment is justice for the unjust." Saint Augustine of Hippo
Reply
#10
(11-20-2014, 12:10 AM)christulsa123 Wrote: Do we have an actual quote of Pope Francis saying the Church could support certain types of civil unions?  The article said he he said this in his most recent interview, but it gave no quote.  I would think if he actually said it, that quote would be headline news across the world.  Not to mention the title of a new FE thread.

Any quotes?  Any hard proof?

Yes, click on the link in my post, and you will find there's plenty of quotes and indeed his most recent comments did cause a stir and were widely reported - again, click on the link.

Quote:States, for instance, justify civil unions as a way to provide economic security to cohabitating couples, the Pope said in a wide-ranging interview published Wednesday in Corriere della Sera, an Italian daily. State-sanctioned unions are thus driven by the need to ensure rights like access to health care, Francis added.

A number of Catholic bishops have supported civil unions for same-sex couples as an alternative to marriage, including Pope Francis when he was Archbishop of Buenos Aires in 2010, according to reports in National Catholic Reporter and The New York Times.

Behind closed doors, pope supported civil unions in Argentina, activist says

But Wednesday's comments are "the first time a Pope has indicated even tentative acceptance of civil unions," according to Catholic News Service.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)