High Carb "diet"
#41
If you are looking for a good, fermented soy product, I suggest doenjang, a highly-nutritious Korean fermentated soybean paste that is used as a base for soups, in sauces, and as a dip for vegetables. It has living cultures that are highly beneficial.

It is possible to make it yourself, but finding organic non-GMO soya beans can be difficult, and it is a skill. I suggest checking Korean grocers and even restaurant suppliers and kimchi companies. I know a couple of small Korean businesses in Chicago that make jars of it, selling it under the counter to customers who ask for it on a word-of-mouth basis. The health department probably wouldn't like the traditional fermentation methods, which involve controlled spoilage in vats or jars.

Depending on where you live, good quality Korean food products made in the USA might be the best option, since I don't trust imported products from China sold at pan-Asian markets. So, check Korean grocers, asking people there, and check with kimchi companies and restaurant suppliers. A restaurant might even be willing to sell some, if they make it themselves. Here is how to say and write doenjang:



If you find jars at a grocery store, check country of origin and GMO status. A surprisingly broad selection of brands are available.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00L9WG624/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687762&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B00F0NPF5C&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=059KMG4D15A663X445RQ

http://www.amazon.com/Premium-Unpasteuri...B00F0NPF5C
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#42
(01-03-2015, 03:04 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: If you are looking for a good, fermented soy product, I suggest doenjang, a highly-nutritious Korean fermentated soybean paste that is used as a base for soups, in sauces, and as a dip for vegetables. It has living cultures that are highly beneficial.

It is possible to make it yourself, but finding organic non-GMO soya beans can be difficult, and it is a skill. I suggest checking Korean grocers and even restaurant suppliers and kimchi companies. I know a couple of small Korean businesses in Chicago that make jars of it, selling it under the counter to customers who ask for it on a word-of-mouth basis. The health department probably wouldn't like the traditional fermentation methods, which involve controlled spoilage in vats or jars.

Depending on where you live, good quality Korean food products made in the USA might be the best option, since I don't trust imported products from China sold at pan-Asian markets. So, check Korean grocers, asking people there, and check with kimchi companies and restaurant suppliers. A restaurant might even be willing to sell some, if they make it themselves. Here is how to say and write doenjang:



If you find jars at a grocery store, check country of origin and GMO status. A surprisingly broad selection of brands are available.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00L9WG624/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687762&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B00F0NPF5C&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=059KMG4D15A663X445RQ

http://www.amazon.com/Premium-Unpasteuri...B00F0NPF5C

Thanks for the suggestion, but it doesn't sound like anything we'd be interested in.  Not too many Korean markets within an easy driving distance, either.
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#43
(01-01-2015, 08:39 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(01-01-2015, 04:43 PM)christulsa123 Wrote: How's it goin on High Carb J Mike?

Thanks for asking, and Happy New Year!

Well, the "high carb diet" has taken a hit.  I blame the Christmas season  :grin: :grin:.  Well...not entirely.  Tbh, we both got really fed up with not eating some of the good foods we like and with being far too generous in our contributions to so-called "global warming" from excess methane production. :LOL:  In other words, the diet contains, for us, way too much fiber and not enough fat.  We haven't  totally jettisoned it, but our "modifications" make it "the not so high carb diet".  We're back to eating meat (especially me), using cooking oils and butter and ghee, and eating more non-starchy vegies (like salad), and fewer grains and starchy vegies. 

So, we used it to "get back on track" with better food and much, much less junk, but you could probably say that we are no longer strictly on "The Starch Solution" high-carb diet.  It served its purpose but is not really for us.

To date I have lost 7 lbs.  Now, that may all have changed when I weigh myself again on Saturday  :grin:.

Happy New Year back at ya.  Well darn, I am sorry to hear you quit the McDougal diet.  I was looking forward to seeing how you progress.  BUT, that is great you are on track eating a more healthy diet!  Would you be interested in trying a low carb-medium protein-high fat diet like Atkins?

Gee, I've never had ghee (pun intended).  Searching for it in my local markets...
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#44
(01-03-2015, 03:04 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: If you are looking for a good, fermented soy product, I suggest doenjang, a highly-nutritious Korean fermentated soybean paste that is used as a base for soups, in sauces, and as a dip for vegetables. It has living cultures that are highly beneficial.

It is possible to make it yourself, but finding organic non-GMO soya beans can be difficult, and it is a skill. I suggest checking Korean grocers and even restaurant suppliers and kimchi companies. I know a couple of small Korean businesses in Chicago that make jars of it, selling it under the counter to customers who ask for it on a word-of-mouth basis. The health department probably wouldn't like the traditional fermentation methods, which involve controlled spoilage in vats or jars.

Depending on where you live, good quality Korean food products made in the USA might be the best option, since I don't trust imported products from China sold at pan-Asian markets. So, check Korean grocers, asking people there, and check with kimchi companies and restaurant suppliers. A restaurant might even be willing to sell some, if they make it themselves. Here is how to say and write doenjang:



If you find jars at a grocery store, check country of origin and GMO status. A surprisingly broad selection of brands are available.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00L9WG624/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687762&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B00F0NPF5C&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=059KMG4D15A663X445RQ

http://www.amazon.com/Premium-Unpasteuri...B00F0NPF5C

Cyriacus,

Ok I'm not sure about soy products like tofu.  I like tofu and tempeh, and have read soy is very healthy.  But then others say to stay away from soy, especially because of concerns about soy affecting hormones.

Can you tell me why soy is so healthy?  that we should be eating lots of it?  is it true you have to get the fermented kind?  any other suggestions?  (like what to look for in mainstream or natural foods grocery stores).
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#45
(01-05-2015, 11:08 PM)christulsa123 Wrote:
(01-01-2015, 08:39 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(01-01-2015, 04:43 PM)christulsa123 Wrote: How's it goin on High Carb J Mike?

Thanks for asking, and Happy New Year!

Well, the "high carb diet" has taken a hit.  I blame the Christmas season  :grin: :grin:.  Well...not entirely.  Tbh, we both got really fed up with not eating some of the good foods we like and with being far too generous in our contributions to so-called "global warming" from excess methane production. :LOL:  In other words, the diet contains, for us, way too much fiber and not enough fat.  We haven't  totally jettisoned it, but our "modifications" make it "the not so high carb diet".  We're back to eating meat (especially me), using cooking oils and butter and ghee, and eating more non-starchy vegies (like salad), and fewer grains and starchy vegies. 

So, we used it to "get back on track" with better food and much, much less junk, but you could probably say that we are no longer strictly on "The Starch Solution" high-carb diet.  It served its purpose but is not really for us.

To date I have lost 7 lbs.  Now, that may all have changed when I weigh myself again on Saturday  :grin:.

Happy New Year back at ya.  Well darn, I am sorry to hear you quit the McDougal diet.  I was looking forward to seeing how you progress.  BUT, that is great you are on track eating a more healthy diet!  Would you be interested in trying a low carb-medium protein-high fat diet like Atkins?

Gee, I've never had ghee (pun intended).  Searching for it in my local markets...

Ghee is excellent!  Very healthful and nutritious.  If you can't find it at a whole foods or health foods store check Indian markets if there are any near you.  Otherwise, you can make your own if you want.  Just ask our friend "Google".

Not the slightest bit interested in Atkins diet, thank you.  Or, for that matter, any other "diet" as such.  We've established guidelines and a basic framework, all of which I've already mentioned and for the reasons I've mentioned, and within that we're eating what we want.  :) 
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#46
Personally, I only rarely consume animal protein, so I get most of my protein from plant sources, mainly legumes like lentils and beans. There are many cultures that traditionally ate soy on a regular basis, both fermented and unfermented, but their diets are different from the Western diet in other ways, so it is difficult to know just what impact soy makes on health. But there are reasons to be cautious, and I wouldn't go overboard. As it is, many people are probably eating too much of it, since it is now a staple of the Western diet.

Heavily-processed soy, like the stuff found in packaged processed foods, is probably best avoided altogether. This is the soy that most Americans eat, in the form of soy lecithin, isolated soy protein, and soybean oil, added to processed foods. This is soy that is sourced by industry to maximize profit, often genetically modified and grown with pesticides. Processing methods can render these products even less healthy; soybean oil is often hydrogenated, and soy products are often produced from soybeans that have been soaked in a harsh alkaline solution to neutralize flavor, which increases the amount of aluminum in the product.

Uncooked, unfermented soybean products are high in antinutrients, inhibiting nutrient absorption. Cooking  neutralizes certain antinutrients and fermentation digests and inactivates lectins and improves the nutritional profile.

I am not sure what to think of the phytoestrogen controversy. There are those who worry about it affecting sex hormones and others who argue that phytoestrogens may help reduce prostate cancer risk. I just do not know, and I have read conflicting things about whether fermentation transforms phytoestrogens in soy.

One aspect of soy that does not get enough attention, I think, is the high level of manganese that naturally is concentrated by the soy plant from the soil. Manganese has neurotoxic properties and can harm the growing brains of infants and children:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...074013.htm

I wouldn't turn soy into a staple. In Asian cuisines, it is not a traditional oil or flour, like in contemporary America, and is used judiciously with other ingredients. A spoonful of miso or doenjang enhances the flavor and nutrition of a soup, along with other flavor enhancers like boiled dried fish and seaweed. Tofu provides body and textural variation to a dish of fresh vegetables.

Right now, I think Americans already eat too much soy, and the wrong kinds of soy. Approximately 70% of the calories eaten by Americans (excluding calories from sugars) comes from just four foods: wheat, dairy, soy, and corn. This is not a particularly nutritious or balanced diet.
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#47
(01-07-2015, 02:54 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: Personally, I only rarely consume animal protein, so I get most of my protein from plant sources, mainly legumes like lentils and beans. There are many cultures that traditionally ate soy on a regular basis, both fermented and unfermented, but their diets are different from the Western diet in other ways, so it is difficult to know just what impact soy makes on health. But there are reasons to be cautious, and I wouldn't go overboard. As it is, many people are probably eating too much of it, since it is now a staple of the Western diet.

Heavily-processed soy, like the stuff found in packaged processed foods, is probably best avoided altogether. This is the soy that most Americans eat, in the form of soy lecithin, isolated soy protein, and soybean oil, added to processed foods. This is soy that is sourced by industry to maximize profit, often genetically modified and grown with pesticides. Processing methods can render these products even less healthy; soybean oil is often hydrogenated, and soy products are often produced from soybeans that have been soaked in a harsh alkaline solution to neutralize flavor, which increases the amount of aluminum in the product.

Uncooked, unfermented soybean products are high in antinutrients, inhibiting nutrient absorption. Cooking  neutralizes certain antinutrients and fermentation digests and inactivates lectins and improves the nutritional profile.

I am not sure what to think of the phytoestrogen controversy. There are those who worry about it affecting sex hormones and others who argue that phytoestrogens may help reduce prostate cancer risk. I just do not know, and I have read conflicting things about whether fermentation transforms phytoestrogens in soy.

One aspect of soy that does not get enough attention, I think, is the high level of manganese that naturally is concentrated by the soy plant from the soil. Manganese has neurotoxic properties and can harm the growing brains of infants and children:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/201...074013.htm

I wouldn't turn soy into a staple. In Asian cuisines, it is not a traditional oil or flour, like in contemporary America, and is used judiciously with other ingredients. A spoonful of miso or doenjang enhances the flavor and nutrition of a soup, along with other flavor enhancers like boiled dried fish and seaweed. Tofu provides body and textural variation to a dish of fresh vegetables.

Right now, I think Americans already eat too much soy, and the wrong kinds of soy. Approximately 70% of the calories eaten by Americans (excluding calories from sugars) comes from just four foods: wheat, dairy, soy, and corn. This is not a particularly nutritious or balanced diet.

Thanks for the info.  I often drank miso before going low carb, but can add it back when I increase carbs.  I felt a surge of energy after drinking miso.  I'm cautious about tofu and other soy products but open to eating more of it, especially since Andrew Weil, MD (one of the founders of the Integrative Medicine movement in the US who I've followed for years) recommends eating a lot of it.  (He also recommends 3 day juice fasts and saunas for detox). 
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