Chabad-Lubavitch Sexual Abuse
#21
im just picturing an italian lady trying to say sometginf yiddish
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#22
(12-20-2014, 03:35 AM)Chestertonian Wrote: i have a good friend who was sexually assaulted by a prominent priest not just in our region but nationally..

she has chosen to keep silent, she goes to counseling but does not sue the church because she does not want the church to have any more negative media attention

she does not want a scandal on their hands

it's sad because he could hurt someone else.

also chabad lubuvitchers are crazy.  Z they are not mainstream orthodox jews.. read their history somr time it's all quite odd
I guess "crazy" is certainly one way to characterize the Chabadniks.  They are more like a cult than anything else, imho, and not always of the most benevolent kind, either.  I will say though,  I've known a number of them (in Israel) and they were really quite rational, easy-going, generous, and intelligent people.  That's not to say that the ones I knew were necessarily representative of the cult as a whole, though.  And... as you correctly say, they are  not mainstream orthodox Jews. 
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#23
(12-20-2014, 02:10 PM)J Michael Wrote: I guess "crazy" is certainly one way to characterize the Chabadniks.  They are more like a cult than anything else, imho, and not always of the most benevolent kind, either.  I will say though,  I've known a number of them (in Israel) and they were really quite rational, easy-going, generous, and intelligent people.  That's not to say that the ones I knew were necessarily representative of the cult as a whole, though.  And... as you correctly say, they are  not mainstream orthodox Jews.

What's so crazy about them?
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#24
(12-20-2014, 02:39 PM)Dirigible Wrote:
(12-20-2014, 02:10 PM)J Michael Wrote: I guess "crazy" is certainly one way to characterize the Chabadniks.  They are more like a cult than anything else, imho, and not always of the most benevolent kind, either.  I will say though,  I've known a number of them (in Israel) and they were really quite rational, easy-going, generous, and intelligent people.  That's not to say that the ones I knew were necessarily representative of the cult as a whole, though.  And... as you correctly say, they are  not mainstream orthodox Jews.

What's so crazy about them?

They're a messianic, evangelical cult (gee, that could describe Christianity, couldn't it? :LOL:).  Now, whether that makes them clinically "crazy" or not, is above my pay grade. :)

Here, check them out: http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cd...avitch.htm
http://www.chabad-mafia.com/
http://failedmessiah.typepad.com/failed_...e-345.html
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#25
(12-20-2014, 02:52 PM)J Michael Wrote:
(12-20-2014, 02:39 PM)Dirigible Wrote:
(12-20-2014, 02:10 PM)J Michael Wrote: I guess "crazy" is certainly one way to characterize the Chabadniks.  They are more like a cult than anything else, imho, and not always of the most benevolent kind, either.  I will say though,  I've known a number of them (in Israel) and they were really quite rational, easy-going, generous, and intelligent people.  That's not to say that the ones I knew were necessarily representative of the cult as a whole, though.  And... as you correctly say, they are  not mainstream orthodox Jews.

What's so crazy about them?

They're a messianic, evangelical cult (gee, that could describe Christianity, couldn't it? :LOL:).  Now, whether that makes them clinically "crazy" or not, is above my pay grade. :)

Here, check them out: http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cd...avitch.htm
http://www.chabad-mafia.com/
http://failedmessiah.typepad.com/failed_...e-345.html

Interesting. What proportion of orthodox Jews belong to them?
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#26
You know, they might be crazy, but I kinda like the way they dress. Better than Islamic dressing, anyways.  :P
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#27
Chabad is rich, and it knows how to go after the right people to increase its standing and influence. There are Chabad Houses at many elite universities with substantial Jewish populations, the goal being the education of Jews, often from secular families, in Judaism in general and Chabad-Lubavitch in particular. There are also Chabad centers, with resident rabbis, in cities around the world where Jews live or do business, including cities in unexpected places, like India and China.

At most there are 200,000 adherents in the Chabad movement, but many more people are involved to a lesser degree, including curious gentiles, and Chabad actively courts worldly influence in an effort to become the face of religious Judaism. Public menorah lightings were instituted by the Lubavitcher Rebbe in 1974, and the National Menorah, under Chabad, has been lit every year since 1979 in a ceremony involving the President of the United States.

Chabad-Lubavitch is a major force behind Noahidism, a missionary outreach effort to gentiles, not to get them to become Jews, but to convince them to acknowledge and obey the Seven Laws of Noah. Jewish authorities, of course, are to interpret these laws for the gentiles. Of course, this is a real danger to Christians because Christ, not the law, is the fullness of God's revelation, and because the prohibition of idolatry is traditionally interpreted by Jewish authorities (including Maimonides) to include belief in Christ's divinity and the worship of Christ.

This video, the highlights of a Chabad outreach conference, gives an impression of the breadth of the network and some notable individuals who have links with Chabad. The secular Jew, Zionist, and lawyer Alan Dershowitz (famous for getting the rich aristocrat von Bulow acquitted on procedural grounds) was a keynote speaker, described as a "friend of Chabad." Another speaker, a rabbi from Russia, describes meeting at the Kremlin with Vladimir Putin and relates a story from Putin's childhood.

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#28
Very interesting, Cyriacus. The public menorah thing worked on me; because I had always seen the name Chabad-Lubavich associated with what appeared to be the public face of all Judaism, I assumed they legitimately represented the Jews.
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#29
(12-20-2014, 04:34 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: You know, they might be crazy, but I kinda like the way they dress. Better than Islamic dressing, anyways.  :P

It is, more or less, the dress of the non-Jewish gentry in 18th Century Poland and the Russian Empire. There is a principle in Jewish law that dictates that Jews are not to imitate the gentiles, even in matters of dress. In actual practice, however, most Jewish men and boys follow whatever their rebbe does, and this goes so far as curling or not curling the sidelocks, or tucking or not them behind the ear. If one rabbi makes a concession to his surrounding environment and culture, his followers adopt it and imitate it through the generations, so you can have a situation where Jewish dress preserves older elements of non-Jewish dress, like a fossil.

A good case of this is headwear. In the Ashkenazic world, Jewish men traditionally wore big, expensive fur hats made from European sable, called shtreimelech (singular shtreimel). Given the former abundance of sable in the forests of Eastern Europe, and the cool climate, fur was very reasonable. But, to this day, Haredi Jewish men wear such hats in the hot Mediterranean sun. I wonder how long they last; fur hates heat. If you have a fur worth anything, it is suggested to leave it in cold storage during the months it is not in use. Even with proper conditioning, I would imagine those big sable hats dry out and start shedding quickly.

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However, Lubavitchers wear a very different kind of hat: the fedora. The fedora used to be an everyday sight in the U.S.A. and Western Europe in the early 20th century; every man went out wearing a hat for many decades. This is the sort of hat that was adopted by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, along with many other Orthodox Jews, rather than the big fur hat. And, sure enough, Lubavitchers copy the fedora exactly; all-black, same band, same brim, same diamond-style crown. What I really wonder is what kind of felt they use; if it is all beaver belly fur felt, it could be quite expensive, and I would guess upwards of $500 for one that is custom-sized.

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#30
Fascinating stuff, Cyriacus!
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