Health myth busted! Low-fat dairy promotes weight gain, heart disease, diabetes
#1
Okay J Michael, I've answered your question about how I regard the low fat high carb diet and I have and still do, post supporting evidence for my position. But these weeks since, you have not responded in kind. Here's another fat buster report/article.

What do you have to offer?

For everyone else, this further supports those who are on the wagon with Adkins, et al. It (the Adkins or Adkins based diet) certainly helped me get off most all of my anti-diabetic meds and also to loose weight and lower my blood pressure.

:comp:


Health myth busted! Low-fat dairy promotes weight gain, heart disease and diabetes

Monday, December 22, 2014 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/048079_low-fa...z3Me6ouh3S


(NaturalNews) There's a reason why many of the people you see regularly guzzling down diet sodas and opting for low- or fat-free dairy when they order their morning lattes are some of the most overweight, unhealthy people in society. Dairy products that have been stripped of their natural fats and fatty acid profiles not only promote unhealthy weight gain but also increase a person's risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and other related ailments.

Believe it or not, the ridiculous "fat makes you fat" myth is still surprisingly prevalent in many segments of society. Many old-school doctors and dietitians, for example, still actively encourage their patients to eat plenty of whole grains and avoid saturated fats, two grossly ill-advised recommendations that will continue to make people fat and ill until this flawed ideology is completely and forever tossed into the dustbin of bad science.

But this will only happen through continued education on the latest science, which is abundantly clear on the matter. As highlighted by Dr. Chris Kresser on his blog, a series of recent studies conclusively shows that consumption of low- and non-fat dairy products encourages the formation of metabolic disease and everything that it entails, including obesity, high cholesterol, insulin resistance, diabetes and heart disease.

A meta-analysis of 16 studies, in fact, co-authored by Dr. Stephen Guyenet, one of Dr. Kresser's colleagues, found that all of these risk factors are directly associated with low- and non-fat dairy consumption. Conversely, full-fat dairy consumption was found to be associated with a decreased risk of all of these conditions.

Your body needs unique fatty acids, nutrients found in dairy fat
By removing the fat from dairy products, food processors end up removing a host of fatty acids and other nutrients along with it. These vital constituents not only aid in the digestion and assimilation of other dairy components like whey but also supply the body with necessary protection against gut and cardiovascular degradation.

Butyrate, for instance, one of the primary fatty acids found in dairy fat, provides energy to the cells lining the colon and helps inhibit inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. In trials, Crohn's disease patients who dosed 4 grams of butyrate daily for eight weeks were completely cured -- butyrate isn't found in non-fat dairy products.

Another study looking at trans-palmitoleic acid, another prominent fatty acid found in dairy fat, determined that this nutrient is essential in regulating blood cholesterol levels. Trans-palmitoleic acid also helps modulate healthy insulin levels and insulin sensitivity, reducing the risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Similar benefits are gained from phytanic acid and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), two other fatty acids in dairy fat. The former was shown to reduce triglyceride levels, improve insulin sensitivity and improve blood sugar regulation, while the latter has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes.

Full-fat dairy isn't for everyone, but many people benefit from it
While some people still contend that animal dairy is for baby animals and isn't intended for human consumption, it is important to remember that everybody's body is different. Some people require a boost in vitamin K2, for instance, which is only really found in high amounts in full-fat dairy. Dairy fat is also an excellent source of healthy saturated fats when it comes from organic, grass-fed animals treated humanely.

"[D]airy fat is also a good source of fat-soluble vitamins like retinol (active vitamin A) and vitamin K2, which are difficult to obtain elsewhere in the diet," wrote Dr. Kresser.

Sources:

http://chriskresser.com

http://www.npr.org

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/048079_low-fa...z3Me54fuLZ
Reply
#2
(12-22-2014, 12:46 PM)Zedta Wrote: Okay J Michael, I've answered your question about how I regard the low fat high carb diet and I have and still do, post supporting evidence for my position. But these weeks since, you have not responded in kind. Here's another fat buster report/article.

What do you have to offer?

For everyone else, this further supports those who are on the wagon with Adkins, et al. It (the Adkins or Adkins based diet) certainly helped me get off most all of my anti-diabetic meds and also to loose weight and lower my blood pressure.

:comp:


Health myth busted! Low-fat dairy promotes weight gain, heart disease and diabetes

Monday, December 22, 2014 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/048079_low-fa...z3Me6ouh3S


(NaturalNews) There's a reason why many of the people you see regularly guzzling down diet sodas and opting for low- or fat-free dairy when they order their morning lattes are some of the most overweight, unhealthy people in society. Dairy products that have been stripped of their natural fats and fatty acid profiles not only promote unhealthy weight gain but also increase a person's risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and other related ailments.

Believe it or not, the ridiculous "fat makes you fat" myth is still surprisingly prevalent in many segments of society. Many old-school doctors and dietitians, for example, still actively encourage their patients to eat plenty of whole grains and avoid saturated fats, two grossly ill-advised recommendations that will continue to make people fat and ill until this flawed ideology is completely and forever tossed into the dustbin of bad science.

But this will only happen through continued education on the latest science, which is abundantly clear on the matter. As highlighted by Dr. Chris Kresser on his blog, a series of recent studies conclusively shows that consumption of low- and non-fat dairy products encourages the formation of metabolic disease and everything that it entails, including obesity, high cholesterol, insulin resistance, diabetes and heart disease.

A meta-analysis of 16 studies, in fact, co-authored by Dr. Stephen Guyenet, one of Dr. Kresser's colleagues, found that all of these risk factors are directly associated with low- and non-fat dairy consumption. Conversely, full-fat dairy consumption was found to be associated with a decreased risk of all of these conditions.

Your body needs unique fatty acids, nutrients found in dairy fat
By removing the fat from dairy products, food processors end up removing a host of fatty acids and other nutrients along with it. These vital constituents not only aid in the digestion and assimilation of other dairy components like whey but also supply the body with necessary protection against gut and cardiovascular degradation.

Butyrate, for instance, one of the primary fatty acids found in dairy fat, provides energy to the cells lining the colon and helps inhibit inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. In trials, Crohn's disease patients who dosed 4 grams of butyrate daily for eight weeks were completely cured -- butyrate isn't found in non-fat dairy products.

Another study looking at trans-palmitoleic acid, another prominent fatty acid found in dairy fat, determined that this nutrient is essential in regulating blood cholesterol levels. Trans-palmitoleic acid also helps modulate healthy insulin levels and insulin sensitivity, reducing the risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Similar benefits are gained from phytanic acid and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), two other fatty acids in dairy fat. The former was shown to reduce triglyceride levels, improve insulin sensitivity and improve blood sugar regulation, while the latter has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes.

Full-fat dairy isn't for everyone, but many people benefit from it
While some people still contend that animal dairy is for baby animals and isn't intended for human consumption, it is important to remember that everybody's body is different. Some people require a boost in vitamin K2, for instance, which is only really found in high amounts in full-fat dairy. Dairy fat is also an excellent source of healthy saturated fats when it comes from organic, grass-fed animals treated humanely.

"[D]airy fat is also a good source of fat-soluble vitamins like retinol (active vitamin A) and vitamin K2, which are difficult to obtain elsewhere in the diet," wrote Dr. Kresser.

Sources:

http://chriskresser.com

http://www.npr.org

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/048079_low-fa...z3Me54fuLZ

Not really much, tbh.  I'll let McDougall, et alia speak for themselves.  Just out of curiosity, have you read "The Starch Solution" or seen the movie/read the book, "Forks Over Knives"?  I've said in one or both of two other threads that we were embarking on the "Starch Solution" plan...with tweaks and modifications to suit our tastes.  I don't "buy" the whole thing hook, line, and sinker, though I might have appeared to do so at the outset.  Just over 2 full weeks into the plan, eating whole-food (and mostly whole-grain), plant based foods, with the addition of some cooking oil, some butter (no other dairy, however), some ghee, some eggs for me (my wife can't eat them), and a little bit of meat I've lost just over 6 lbs.

So, breakfast might consist of a big bowl of oatmeal with cinnamon, raisins, a little honey, almond milk, an apple, and a big mug of black tea. Or...a big bowl of Ezekiel cereal and Grape Nuts with dried fruit, a few roasted cashews, an apple and a big mug of black tea.  Or...a couple soft-boiled eggs and 2 pieces of Ezekiel bread toast with either hummus or peanut butter or some other spread, an apple or applesauce, and a big mug of black tea. 

We tend not to eat "lunch" but have a little snack or two, like rice cakes or corn thins with hummus or tahini, or a cup of miso soup.  Or some fruit.  Or maybe nothing.  Or air-popped pop corn.  Or....

Dinner varies a lot.  Last night, for example, I made haluski--fried onions and cabbage with sea-shell pasta.  Or...a great Irish veg/bean stew that I came across in a cook book.  Or,  whole grain pasta with pasta sauce.  Or, a big salad with some whole wheat flat bread.  Or homemade minestrone soup.  Or rice (usually brown, but not always) with veggies and a sauce.  The possibilities are endless. 

We've eliminated almost all dairy, a large amount of oil (that is, when we use it, we use less of it), most meat, and most junk food and virtually all "fast foods".  Mind you, if we get a craving for a Whopper or Wendy's great chili, which we haven't yet, we're not going to martyr ourselves to "The Plan"... :O :grin:.

We've cleaned up our eating, improved the quality of the food, are not starving or becoming malnourished, and we're both losing weight.  That's pretty much what we set out to do, and the McDougall/Forks Over Knives, etc. eating plan provided a catalyst and a basic framework to get us going.  I'm at an age now where I refuse to martyr myself to or become a groupie of any particular diet or eating plan.  I just want to eat better and lose some weight.  That's exactly what we're doing.

I also don't want to get into a pissing contest or a link-posting contest about which "diet" is the BEST diet for humanity--'coz there ain't ONE such thing, imho.  Like Olddavid said somewhere, (to paraphrase him) just eat good stuff that comes from the ground, mostly in moderation.  I've been around the block enough times and involved for many years in healthcare and nutrition to know there is no ONE right way, no panacea, and that no matter what we eat or refrain from eating....we're all gonna die and meet our Maker.

And that, dear friend, is why haven't specifically answered you.  If you go through the last several entries in the "High Carb..." thread, and your first thread in response to it, you'll see I've said much the same in one or both of those, but in a slightly different manner.  Just as one example, see this post.

:) :)
Reply
#3
Okay. It really seems we are 'In the same concert hall and maybe even the same orchestra, but a different page of music'..if you will. And, ya the conductor is symbolic of Our Creator too. He knows the path we should follow and being so differently alike; one soup mix may work better than another on any given person's health.

We are all grossly the same, but exquisitely different.

The combo I used works(ed) for me. Perhaps yours will work for you. I'd guess that like, me, this isn't the first foray into finding that right mix of foods to correct some health issue that you have been in. If so, then we know how hard that is. It seems to me that the one I use works for me. Perhaps someone else may like my 'soup', perhaps they'll have the same sheet of music you do...who knows?

Try it, if it isn't fundamentally harmful, and see how it works for you. Everything else is an experiment. Once you try it, its then personal evidence.

Anyway, here is my post, BTW, just before yours and it points out why I think as I do.

Quote from: christulsa123 on December 09, 2014, 04:56:pm

    So I asked my wife.  She said that Filipinos traditionally eat rice, fish, vegetables, eggs, soups, saute more than stir-fry or deep-fry, with almost no dairy.  Very little meat.  When they have meat, its more chicken or pork, and very little beef.  The "modern" Filipino diet has a lot more sugar, rice, and deep-frying.  There has been a rise in diabetes, heart disease, and strokes.



Yup, just like the Native American Indians who stray from their traditional fare ("Gotta have my fry-bread!") and the everyday 'American' who eats badly too. Eat unhealthily, and in time,  you'll lose health too. Vegans especially, always seem to have a cold...ever notice? Vegetarians to a lesser degree. You need animal amino acids and B12 to make antibodies. If you don't get that, you get sick...plain and simple.

Bad diets are easy to do, just eat one class of foods and you'll loose weight, as I told J. Michael, its a kind of starvation. As Henry David T. said, everything in moderation. Skimp on the stuff that puts you out of balance and you'll do fine. A little bit this and a little bit of that, never too much of anything. Just remember; Fats are for energy, easily converted into fuel to be burned, but stored if more available stuff, like carbs, starchy or not, is in the blood stream being worked on by insulin. Proteins are kinda neutral, but those provided with a sound dose of fat get used quicker than those with carbs and no fats.
Reply
#4
(12-22-2014, 03:04 PM)Zedta Wrote: Okay. It really seems we are 'In the same concert hall and maybe even the same orchestra, but a different page of music'..if you will. And, ya the conductor is symbolic of Our Creator too. He knows the path we should follow and being so differently alike; one soup mix may work better than another on any given person's health.

We are all grossly the same, but exquisitely different.

The combo I used works(ed) for me. Perhaps yours will work for you. I'd guess that like, me, this isn't the first foray into finding that right mix of foods to correct some health issue that you have been in. If so, then we know how hard that is. It seems to me that the one I use works for me. Perhaps someone else may like my 'soup', perhaps they'll have the same sheet of music you do...who knows?

Try it, if it isn't fundamentally harmful, and see how it works for you. Everything else is an experiment. Once you try it, its then personal evidence.

Anyway, here is my post, BTW, just before yours and it points out why I think as I do.

Quote from: christulsa123 on December 09, 2014, 04:56:pm

    So I asked my wife.  She said that Filipinos traditionally eat rice, fish, vegetables, eggs, soups, saute more than stir-fry or deep-fry, with almost no dairy.  Very little meat.  When they have meat, its more chicken or pork, and very little beef.  The "modern" Filipino diet has a lot more sugar, rice, and deep-frying.  There has been a rise in diabetes, heart disease, and strokes.



Yup, just like the Native American Indians who stray from their traditional fare ("Gotta have my fry-bread!") and the everyday 'American' who eats badly too. Eat unhealthily, and in time,  you'll lose health too. Vegans especially, always seem to have a cold...ever notice? Vegetarians to a lesser degree. You need animal amino acids and B12 to make antibodies. If you don't get that, you get sick...plain and simple.

Bad diets are easy to do, just eat one class of foods and you'll loose weight, as I told J. Michael, its a kind of starvation. As Henry David T. said, everything in moderation. Skimp on the stuff that puts you out of balance and you'll do fine. A little bit this and a little bit of that, never too much of anything. Just remember; Fats are for energy, easily converted into fuel to be burned, but stored if more available stuff, like carbs, starchy or not, is in the blood stream being worked on by insulin. Proteins are kinda neutral, but those provided with a sound dose of fat get used quicker than those with carbs and no fats.

Yup.  :)

Btw, I haven't noticed that "vegans always seem to have a cold".  I know and know of vegans who eat very badly and are still vegans, while others eat very healthily as vegans (and vegetarians).  I haven't noticed either a greater or lesser incidence of colds amongst either group.  But then, I haven't done (or seen) a large sampled, double-blind, placebo longitudinal study that addresses that.  Have you?  Why any individual gets a cold or gets colds frequently has a lot to do with a number of variables, not just whether or not they are vegan or vegetarian.  But then, you knew that, didn't you? :)
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#5
Yup, and nutrition is one of those 'big variables'.

As for my observation, it was totally an unscientifically obtained theory, based on observations I've made. Could be altogether wrong, it is just a perceived variable on data gathered without a control or method.
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#6
(12-23-2014, 12:27 AM)Zedta Wrote: Yup, and nutrition is one of those 'big variables'.

As for my observation, it was totally an unscientifically obtained theory, based on observations I've made. Could be altogether wrong, it is just a perceived variable on data gathered without a control or method.

My point precisely.  :) :)
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