CDC lies: Measles outbreaks confirmed among children already vaccinated
#1
Vaccinations do not give lifelong immunity to the disease they inoculate you for. In fact, they can make you more susceptible to any 'mutated' form of the disease that may come around. Case in point is the measles outbreak at Disneyland in California. At the outset, the media trumpeted that the outbreak was from among unvaccinated children, then they said, mostly unvaccinated and finally settling nearer to the truth, by saying some unvaccinated children.

Truth is the outbreak was vastly among the vaccinated children that became sick.

Keyboard Warrior



CDC lies: Measles outbreaks confirmed among children already vaccinated
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/048391_measle...z3Ps3qgDYG


(NaturalNews) Maybe Mickey Mouse is responsible for spreading measles to children at Disneyland? This is a more likely hypothesis than health department claims that unvaccinated children are to blame for a recent outbreak that occurred at "the happiest place on Earth," in which 39 people -- and counting -- from at least four states, according to the latest reports, have been confirmed as having contracted the disease while visiting the park.

Official reports are claiming that unvaccinated children are to blame because some of those who contracted the measles hadn't been vaccinated. Some of them had been vaccinated, of course, and the original source of the disease has yet to be determined. But like always, it is automatically those pesky individuals who choose not to inject their bodies with a vaccine linked to brain damage and autism -- and that's been shown to spread the measles -- that must have triggered the outbreak.

The interesting thing about this latest measles outbreak is that the media is parading it around as evidence that not getting vaccinated triggers disease outbreaks, even though the original source of the disease is unknown. It is entirely possible that a vaccinated person spread the disease to both vaccinated and unvaccinated people, which in and of itself shows the lack of effectiveness of vaccines.

If the vaccine for measles -- in the U.S., this vaccine is the combination measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) injection -- really did work as claimed, then all the measles cases identified at Disneyland would have been in unvaccinated people. But they weren't. Early on, media reports claimed that "most" of the cases were in unvaccinated people. More recent reports are saying that "some" of the people were unvaccinated.

MMR vaccines can trigger "atypical" measles, potentially triggering a measles outbreak
As you may already be aware, many previous measles outbreaks have occurred among mostly vaccinated populations, for which health officials have no explanation other than to, again, blame the unvaccinated (which makes no sense). Many measles-vaccinated individuals have also come down with what's known as "atypical" measles infection later in life, the direct result of having gotten vaccinated.

In a paper published back in 1979, atypical measles infection was described as a "hypersensitivity" response to a natural measles infection due to having previously been injected with an inactivated measles virus. A measles epidemic that occurred several years prior in Northern California exhibited all the signs of atypical measles caused by vaccination.

"In typical measles a maculopapular rash occurs first at the hairline, progresses caudally, is concentrated on the face and trunk, and is often accompanied by Koplik's spots," explains the study, as reported by the International Medical Council on Vaccination.

"In AMS [atypical measles] the rash Is morphologically a mixture of maculopapular, petechial, vesicular, and urticarial components. It usually begins and is concentrated primarily on the extremities, progresses cephalad, and is not accompanied by Koplik's spots."

Without going into too many details, the point here is that a measles-vaccinated population was responsible for this particular outbreak, and likely many others. And yet the mainstream media is making no mention of AMS in its reports, instead choosing to perpetuate the lie that unvaccinated people are always the cause of disease outbreaks. While they may be the cause in some cases, they are most likely not in most of them.

As we reported back in 2011, the Institute of Medicine even admitted in a report claiming that MMR vaccines don't cause autism that the vaccines can, in fact, cause measles. On page 574, in fact, this report claims that the evidence "convincingly supports" the notion that MMR vaccines cause measles.

More on this is available here:
NaturalNews.com.

Sources:

http://baltimore.cbslocal.com

http://www.vaccinationcouncil.org

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/048391_measle...z3Ps1eCRfv
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#2
Seems as though this outbreak is worsening. It also appears that being immunize against measles with the MMR (Measles Mumps Rubella) vaccine is not a guarantee to not contract this strain of measles either. This outbreak in the story below, appears directly linked to people who where at Disneyland when the infection broke out. They way this got going and the virility of the infection's spread is truly remarkable. Measles is VERY contagious and couple that with the fact that a victim is spreading the virus around for a week or more before they even feel ill.

It makes one wonder if it was a biological attack, that many more who were exposed didn't become sick (who, like me actually had measles as a child and therefore have a life-long immunity to the old virus) or who had a very recent vaccination with MMR. However this goes down, there are gonna be more cases to follow, it ain't over yet and there is no fat lady anywhere to be seen.


Keyboard Warrior


Arizona measles outbreak reaches 'critical point'
Connie Cone Sexton and Paulina Pineda, The Arizona Republic 2:41 p.m. EST January 28, 2015

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/.../22452491/

A 4-month-old baby was exposed to the measles virus during a visit to Phoenix Children's Hospital's and she is only one of the 195 others who were potentially exposed.

Two more cases of measles were confirmed in Arizona on Tuesday, and public health officials have warned that hundreds more people in the state may have been exposed this month.

Both of the cases confirmed Tuesday — a man in Pinal County and a woman in Phoenix — were linked to a family of four whose measles cases were confirmed last week following travel to Disneyland in California.

The outbreak of measles has reached "a critical point," according to Will Humble, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services. The outbreak has the potential to be far worse than the state's last measles outbreak in 2008, he said.

Humble said the number of cases will "absolutely" continue to grow.

"I am certain we will have more just based on the sheer number of people exposed this time," he said.

Health officials believe the Phoenix-area woman recently diagnosed with measles may have exposed as many as 195 children to the disease at the Phoenix Children's East Valley Center on Jan. 20 and 21.

Maricopa County officials were in the process of contacting the children's families Tuesday. A hospital official told 12 News that the woman was not an employee and it was not known why she was at the facility.

Humble said that although officials have a list of people who were at the hospital, the problem is not knowing whether those exposed to the measles have had contact with other people in large gatherings or traveled outside their county.

"You spread it (the measles) before you feel bad," he said, adding that symptoms usually appear about a week after exposure.

The confirmed case also prompted Maricopa County health officials to recommend that all exposed children who have not had at least one dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine to stay home from school or day care for the 21-day incubation period. Officials also said exposed adults who were born after 1957, have not had measles or have had only one MMR vaccine, should not go to work or public places for the same 21-day period.

Health officials say two doses of the MMR vaccine provide full protection against measles.

The Pinal County case also raises the possibility of exposure for other residents or visitors in the area, as the man who is now recovering visited various public locations while still infectious. Officials have compiled a list of businesses where the man visited Thursday and Friday, including a Kearny, Ariz. gas station and post office.

Humble said the state has been in contact with health workers across Arizona, alerting them to measles symptoms.

"For many clinicians, it's an illness they've never seen," he said.

According to Pinal County health officials, measles begins with a fever, red and watery eyes, a cough and a runny nose, followed by a red, raised and blotchy rash that begins on the head at the hairline and moves to the lower extremities. Symptoms typically appear seven to 12 days after exposure to measles but may take up to 21 days.

The recent outbreak is thought to have originated at Disneyland before Christmas. The California Department of Public Health reported last week that the state has 59 confirmed cases, with 42 linked to Disneyland or California Adventure in Anaheim. The outbreak has spread to Washington, Utah, Colorado, Oregon and Arizona.

Last week, Maricopa County officials reported that a woman in her 50s tested positive for measles, which they believe she contracted at Disneyland.
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#3
Two things to keep in mind:

1. The MMR is about 97% effective in preventing measles. That means for every 100 people exposed, 3 will develop measles anyway. That's better than the majority - approaching 100% - getting it if exposed (assuming they didn't have natural immunity). For 195 people to be diagnosed with the disease, that means by rough back-of-the-envelope calculation, about 6,500 people have been exposed, which doesn't seem unreasonable considering WHERE the exposures took place. The 4-month-old baby who was exposed to measles from the article is TOO YOUNG to be vaccinated, if the US schedule is anything like ours that is generally recommended at around 12 months of age.

2. That 97% immunity is only achieved by having 2, and in some individuals, 3 doses of the vaccine. Many, many children do not get all their doses, and many adults haven't had them either. So yes, they are vaccinated, but not to recommendations, resulting in reduced immunity, something around 50% if I remember correctly. So to say, "vaccinated people are getting measles" is a bit of a straw-man argument, as we don't know how many of these "vaccinated" people were fully vaccinated, and even if they were, we know a small percentage will get measles anyway. The number of actual diagnosed cases is a testament to just how VIRULENT measles is, and how easy it is to expose a large number of people in a very, very short time.

I didn't vaccinate my kids for a long, long time due to fear - I have a child who has had adverse reactions to various different vaccines. But I have now chosen to vaccinate my children after doing years of research and thinking and praying, mostly to protect children like my Abby who cannot safely received vaccines, and my baby who is too young.
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#4
Vaccination ought to be mandatory and enforced by law.
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#5
(03-04-2015, 09:14 AM)Leonhard Wrote: Vaccination ought to be mandatory and enforced by law.

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Sieg Heil!!

I mean...REALLY??

That does sound so Nazi-like.
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#6
Yes, I do believe the MMR vaccine should be mandatory, for everyone without exception.
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#7
(03-07-2015, 02:55 PM)Leonhard Wrote: Yes, I do believe the MMR vaccine should be mandatory, for everyone without exception.

Even for people who've already had measles and/or mumps and/or rubella?  Or regardless of the consequences?  You know, like for people like PrairieMom's Abby...

I suppose you also favor mandatory flu shots for everyone without exception and having everybody's medical history put on a chip and implanted under their skin, too, right, along with an..."oopsies, did we forget to mention that little gps thingy on that chip?"

Fascism comes in many guises and infects people of all faiths.  What a pity there's no vaccine against *that*!
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#8
(03-07-2015, 08:49 PM)J Michael Wrote: Even for people who've already had measles and/or mumps and/or rubella?

No, not if they've been naturally exposed to the disease prior to the age of vaccination. Needless to say exposure parties where parents i tentionally try to get their children infected should be classified as child abuse. The sending of infected candy via mail is already illegal.

Quote:Or regardless of the consequences?

The benefits vastly outweigh the risks.

Quote:I suppose you also favor mandatory flu shots for everyone without exception and having everybody's medical history put on a chip and implanted under their skin, too, right, along with an..."oopsies, did we forget to mention that little gps thingy on that chip?"

Don't be ridiculous.

We've had mandatory vaccination in place in the past, part of large scale programs that managed to wipe large diseases off the face of the world.

Fascism comes in many guises and infects people of all faiths.  What a pity there's no vaccine against *that*!
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#9
(03-04-2015, 09:14 AM)Leonhard Wrote: Vaccination ought to be mandatory and enforced by law.

I'm amazed there's actually someone who thinks the government should forcibly inject whatever they want into people, like animals. But then I shouldn't be, should I?

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#10
(03-08-2015, 03:24 AM)Leonhard Wrote:
(03-07-2015, 08:49 PM)J Michael Wrote: Even for people who've already had measles and/or mumps and/or rubella?

No, not if they've been naturally exposed to the disease prior to the age of vaccination. Needless to say exposure parties where parents i tentionally try to get their children infected should be classified as child abuse.


Like I said, fascism comes in many guises and infects people of all faiths, even in socialist Denmark, I guess.  What a pity there's no vaccine against *that*!

Quote:Or regardless of the consequences?


(03-08-2015, 03:24 AM)Leonhard Wrote: The benefits vastly outweigh the risks.

This is highly debatable, *especially* in "first world" countries where there is good sanitation and the very vast majority of children are relatively healthy and generally well-nourished.


(03-08-2015, 03:24 AM)Leonhard Wrote: Don't be ridiculous.

We've had mandatory vaccination in place in the past, part of large scale programs that managed to wipe large diseases off the face of the world.

Hmm....if you look at graphs showing the incidence of varies illnesses for which vaccines were developed you would see that many, if not all of them, were already well in decline when the vaccines were introduced.  Then there's the whole phenomenon of if you "wipe out" acute illnesses you lay the foundation for deeper seated, longer lasting, more debilitating chronic diseases.  That's a concept that most people blindly in love with modern western medicine  are either unfamiliar with or choose to ignore.  And, please don't get me wrong, modern western medicine has much to offer, but mostly or especially in the areas of emergency medicine and surgery.
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