Why the Extraordinary? (Documentary project)
#11
Thanks for the reply Vox :)

Quote: From Vox Clamantis The one qualm I'd have is to make it exceedingly clear that there is a HUGE difference between the Old Testament religion and modern Judaism., which is Pharisaic rabbinism based on the Talmud more than Torah or the rest of the Old Testament. In fact, I'd avoid using the word "Judaism," sticking with the "Old Testament religion" instead in order to make that clear. The conflation of the two is a serious problem, especially among American Christians. But the philosemitism aside, showing how truly ancient Catholicism is is a totally KEY thing to emphasize (the list of Popes starting with St. Peter, thrown in as an aside, is one of those facts that gets people thinking).

How about if I simply say Old Testament Judaism or at least the Jews of the Old Testament? I think that would clarify that I am talking about the Hebrew and Jewish people but specifically those which lived before the time of Christ. I read a book by Pope Benedict which he talks about Post Biblical Judaism, obviously stressing the fact that they are not the same as those of Biblical Judaism

Also thank you for pointing out the similarities between the Old Testament Jewish religion and that of the Catholic Mass

I am wondering if there are specific Jewish aspects which can be found in the Tridentine Mass but which might be omitted in the Novus Ordo, or at least Jewish aspects which are more explicitly and clearly expressed than in the Novus Ordo
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#12
I  love the idea and look forward to seeing it. 
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#13
(02-06-2015, 05:48 PM)ArturoOrtiz Wrote: Thanks for the reply Vox :)

Quote: From Vox Clamantis The one qualm I'd have is to make it exceedingly clear that there is a HUGE difference between the Old Testament religion and modern Judaism., which is Pharisaic rabbinism based on the Talmud more than Torah or the rest of the Old Testament. In fact, I'd avoid using the word "Judaism," sticking with the "Old Testament religion" instead in order to make that clear. The conflation of the two is a serious problem, especially among American Christians. But the philosemitism aside, showing how truly ancient Catholicism is is a totally KEY thing to emphasize (the list of Popes starting with St. Peter, thrown in as an aside, is one of those facts that gets people thinking).

How about if I simply say Old Testament Judaism or at least the Jews of the Old Testament? I think that would clarify that I am talking about the Hebrew and Jewish people but specifically those which lived before the time of Christ. I read a book by Pope Benedict which he talks about Post Biblical Judaism, obviously stressing the fact that they are not the same as those of Biblical Judaism

Also thank you for pointing out the similarities between the Old Testament Jewish religion and that of the Catholic Mass

I am wondering if there are specific Jewish aspects which can be found in the Tridentine Mass but which might be omitted in the Novus Ordo, or at least Jewish aspects which are more explicitly and clearly expressed than in the Novus Ordo

You could use the term "Old Testament Church".
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#14
The blog "Harvesting the Fruit of Vatican II" has an entry today about the Latin Mass with things I have never heard before.  You could read that for more ideas.  I found it very interesting.

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#15
Update

I have contacted Fr James Fryar FSSP (Los Angeles) and he has accepted to be interviewed  :)

Also in the process of doing this documentary I managed to invite several young Catholic parishioners form my parish (a liberal Novus Ordo Parish) and they accepted to go with me this coming Sunday. Also one of them happens to be a seminarian  :)

Deus Gratias
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#16
(02-05-2015, 06:29 PM)ArturoOrtiz Wrote: Does anyone know or identify specific things in the Traditional Latin Mass which have Jewish roots, which are not included in the Ordinary Form of the Mass?
I have some stuff about the traditional layout of churches, but that is offline.
There is also the things with the six candles (+crucifix) on the altar, seven for a pontifical high mass.
Some Churches in Europe still have very old candelabra, which tell where it comes from:
[Image: d2301.jpg]
(Cathedral of Brunswick, candelabrum from the 12th century, a gift by a King to the Cathedral)
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