Our Cute Little Protestant Friends
#1
The usually acerbic Kathy Shaidle has posted the following at the usually randy site Takimag :

http://takimag.com/article/our_cute_litt...z3Sg1Vf9Bd

Money quotation:

When we split up, we kept the best painters, writers, and, later, filmmakers, from Coppola and Scorsese to John Waters—plus the jokes, (most of) the booze, the smokes, and the food.

Protestants ended up with Thomas Kinkade, Jack Chick, grape juice, and marshmallow & Jell-O “salad.” And, weirdest of all to us, they seem pretty godd**n (I mean, darn) self-satisfied about that arrangement.




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#2
I usually avoid the comments sections of websites. I keep it as a personal rule. I only have a couple of non-message board sites that I read any user posted material on. Unfortunately, I broke the rule for a couple of minutes with this article, and I remembered why I have this rule.

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#3
(02-24-2015, 12:13 PM)New Arcadian Wrote: I usually avoid the comments sections of websites. I keep it as a personal rule. I only have a couple of non-message board sites that I read any user posted material on. Unfortunately, I broke the rule for a couple of minutes with this article, and I remembered why I have this rule.

I read ya. Usually, though, Takimag commentators are among the more interesting, erudite commentators in the commentsphere. Several radtrad Catholics regularly respond (like Boris), but this one, understandably, was largely Protestant huffing and puffing.
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#4
(02-24-2015, 12:13 PM)New Arcadian Wrote: I usually avoid the comments sections of websites. I keep it as a personal rule. I only have a couple of non-message board sites that I read any user posted material on. Unfortunately, I broke the rule for a couple of minutes with this article, and I remembered why I have this rule.

The same thing happened with me.  :LOL:
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#5
There's nothing like a good Kathy Shaidle article to start the day off.

To be a momentary buzzkill: As much as I enjoy reading it, I find it somewhat disturbing that a consistently vulgar magazine with connections to movements like white nationalism is one of the few sources of common sense in this world, but I guess that shows how far flung our society is from normalcy.
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#6
(02-24-2015, 12:53 PM)Ave Castitatis Lilium Wrote: There's nothing like a good Kathy Shaidle article to start the day off.

To be a momentary buzzkill: As much as I enjoy reading it, I find it somewhat disturbing that a consistently vulgar magazine with connections to movements like white nationalism is one of the few sources of common sense in this world, but I guess that shows how far flung our society is from normalcy.

I've been reading Takimag since its inception. Of what white nationalism connections do you speak? As far as I know, anybody who might have fallen into that category is now gone. (I am thinking primarily of Richard Spencer.)
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#7
There's lots of overlap between people who write there and write on American Renaissance and similar stuff.

I'm not a paranoid anti-racist but race realism devolves to quickly into race hatred that I prefer to just leave the subject alone. It might be scientifically correct, but every race is created in the Image of God so to mistreat someone because of their race is blasphemy against that Image.
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#8
I agree that race realism becomes an obsession for many, but I think the problem with simply ignoring it is that race is going to be an issue for us whether we want to deal with it or not. If we just ignore it, we end up with conservatives either caving in whenever they are called racist or else blathering on about universal human rights, human dignity, Western values, our Judeo-Christian heritage, and all the rest of it. Catholics, it seems to me, could, if they would get over their subjection to ethical humanitarianism, offer an interesting perspective on human difference of all sorts.

In particular, I think the Catholic way of approaching the world is one of the few traditions that seriously calls into question the ways in which moderns have formulated the distinctions between mind and body, nature and civilization, and perhaps even between nature and nurture, which I suppose is to an extent simply one aspect of the larger nature/civilization dichotomy. Here, I think one ought to consider the sacramental quality of Catholicism and the way in which this can mediate between the particular and the universal, without rejecting either. As the speaker of David Jones's "The Wall," asked, "What did our mothers tell us? What did their mothers tell to them? What the earth-mother told to them? But what did the queen of heaven tell her?" In contrast to Protestantism, the Catholic view, I think, is to see a degree of typological continuity alongside the rupture that followed the Christian revelation. The Incarnation was not simply an arbitrary intervention, but rather something deeply connected to human nature and human history.

Ironically, I think the position of someone like Alain de Benoist--with his focus on regional and ethnic differences rather than national ones, his rejection of the utilitarian and scientistic perspective of many American race realists, and his questioning of some of the dichotomies I mentioned above--is in many ways not that far from what a proper Catholic view would look like. For Catholic sources, I would consider, say, Joseph de Maistre or Pascal. Both lived before we had much understanding of genetics and so forth, of course, but at the same time, they were around when many of our modern assumptions about the world were still developing, and I think their criticisms of these assumptions are useful and insightful. Unfortunately, though, most of the Catholic Church today seems to have uncritically accepted much of the technological spirit of modernity, with only the occasional criticism that usually does not get to the root of the problem, and as a result has committed itself to courses of action that go along with the enframing of the world and of humanity itself. 
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#9
(02-24-2015, 05:12 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: I agree that race realism becomes an obsession for many, but I think the problem with simply ignoring it is that race is going to be an issue for us whether we want to deal with it or not. If we just ignore it, we end up with conservatives either caving in whenever they are called racist or else blathering on about universal human rights, human dignity, Western values, our Judeo-Christian heritage, and all the rest of it. Catholics, it seems to me, could, if they would get over their subjection to ethical humanitarianism, offer an interesting perspective on human difference of all sorts.

In particular, I think the Catholic way of approaching the world is one of the few traditions that seriously calls into question the ways in which moderns have formulated the distinctions between mind and body, nature and civilization, and perhaps even between nature and nurture, which I suppose is to an extent simply one aspect of the larger nature/civilization dichotomy. Here, I think one ought to consider the sacramental quality of Catholicism and the way in which this can mediate between the particular and the universal, without rejecting either. As the speaker of David Jones's "The Wall," asked, "What did our mothers tell us? What did their mothers tell to them? What the earth-mother told to them? But what did the queen of heaven tell her?" In contrast to Protestantism, the Catholic view, I think, is to see a degree of typological continuity alongside the rupture that followed the Christian revelation. The Incarnation was not simply an arbitrary intervention, but rather something deeply connected to human nature and human history.

Ironically, I think the position of someone like Alain de Benoist--with his focus on regional and ethnic differences rather than national ones, his rejection of the utilitarian and scientistic perspective of many American race realists, and his questioning of some of the dichotomies I mentioned above--is in many ways not that far from what a proper Catholic view would look like. For Catholic sources, I would consider, say, Joseph de Maistre or Pascal. Both lived before we had much understanding of genetics and so forth, of course, but at the same time, they were around when many of our modern assumptions about the world were still developing, and I think their criticisms of these assumptions are useful and insightful. Unfortunately, though, most of the Catholic Church today seems to have uncritically accepted much of the technological spirit of modernity, with only the occasional criticism that usually does not get to the root of the problem, and as a result has committed itself to courses of action that go along with the enframing of the world and of humanity itself.

Well said, Crusading Philologist. Have you read Dr. Thomas Fleming's The Morality of Everyday Life? He speaks to the concerns that you have expressed. Also, with what book by de Benoist do you suggest that one begin?
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#10
(02-24-2015, 07:06 PM)Bourbon Apocalypse Wrote: what book by de Benoist do you suggest that one begin?

Manifesto for a European Renaissance 
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