Ultimate fate of Satan?
#1

What is the traditional Catholic view of the fate of Satan?  Will he live forever or will his soul be annihilated at the end of the world?  And then Hell will continue but without him?
I have also read views that even Satan will be eventually converted and saved and will resume his former exalted status in Heaven.
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#2
I've never heard anyone argue that Satan will be annihilated. Why would this be the case? Anyway, as far as I know, the orthodox position is that he is damned for eternity. I've always had some sympathy for the Origenist claim that even Satan and the other fallen angels will eventually be restored in some way--it seems so much richer and more intellectually serious than the milquetoast universalism we get these days--but I believe that position was condemned at the Second Council of Constantinople.
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#3
I think traditionally speaking Satan and the other fallen angels are damned for eternity. Origenism has become fashionable again but it's definitely not orthodox. There are some fathers like St. Isaac the Syrian ( whom I'm quite fond of) who in some places seem to suggest we should pray for the demons, but that's not orthodox. I think somewhere in the City of God  St. Augustine made the case that since Christ said ( in the passage about the sheep and the goats in Matthew) " everlasting fire" He meant just that, that it is forever. Heaven is forever, so is hell.

It would also be unjust for there to be some final restoration I think, as if in the end our actions didn't matter. Wouldn't a final restoration even of the demons seem to negate free will itself or call it into question, or at least render our actions as bereft of ultimate consequences?
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#4
He will live forever n Hell.
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#5
IIRC it goes something like this: angels lacking physical bodies are all intellect and can't have their senses (as they are) deceived, so they're never "wrong" and can thus never change their minds. Thus, the rebellious angels won't ever repent so prayers are as wasted as they are on anyone in Hell (who they can't help).  Similar to the prayers on those in Heaven don't need our prayers (we need theirs!).
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#6
Concerning annihilation, I don't know about magisterial teaching, but St. Thomas Aquinas writes (S.T. I, Q. 104, a4):
  • Now the nature of creatures shows that none of them is annihilated. For, either they are immaterial, and therefore have no potentiality to non-existence; or they are material, and then they continue to exist, at least in matter, which is incorruptible, since it is the subject of generation and corruption. Moreover, the annihilation of things does not pertain to the manifestation of grace; since rather the power and goodness of God are manifested by the preservation of things in existence. Wherefore we must conclude by denying absolutely that anything at all will be annihilated.
He also discusses the obstinate will of the demons (S.T. I, Q. 64, a2) and the defective nature of their remorse (Supp. Q. 98, a2), among other things.
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#7
Ultimate fate of Satan? 

Hell
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