Favourite Saints
#11
St Germaine Cousin
:) :) :)
Reply
#12
In considering my answer I've come to realize that I don't list individual favorites as much as I tend to bunch favored saints into groups. So in no particular order I would choose:
The early Jesuits
The Carmelite Reformers
The hidden Carthusian saints
The desert fathers (with St. Charbel and a smattering of Orthodox figures-St. Theophan the Recluse being the most prominent.)
Early Franciscan saints with Padre Pio included for good measure.

There are others but if I would begin to list them I might never stop.
Reply
#13
SS. Boethius, John Cassian, Dionysius (the Pseudo-Areopagite), Maximus the Confessor, Symeon the New Theologian, Basil the Great, Ephrem the Syrian, Cædmon (disputed status, and I suspect the Heliand might be a translation of an original Anglo-Saxon poem by Caedmon into Old Saxon, as was suggested by certain 19th century scholars)

Not saints (yet):

Eriugena, Bl. Ramon Llull, Dante Aleghieri, Girolamo Savonarola
Reply
#14
(In no particular order)

1. St. Maximilian Kolbe
2. St. Michael the Archangel
3. St. Padre Pio
4. St. Agustine
5. Pope St. Pius X
Reply
#15
(06-16-2015, 11:51 AM)Cyriacus Wrote: SS. Boethius, John Cassian, Dionysius (the Pseudo-Areopagite), Maximus the Confessor, Symeon the New Theologian, Basil the Great, Ephrem the Syrian, Cædmon (disputed status, and I suspect the Heliand might be a translation of an original Anglo-Saxon poem by Caedmon into Old Saxon, as was suggested by certain 19th century scholars)

Not saints (yet):

Eriugena, Bl. Ramon Llull, Dante Aleghieri, Girolamo Savonarola

Wait, Pseudo-Dionysus is not a saint.
Reply
#16
You are right.

Little is known about the biography of the actual author, but the treatises were attributed for most of history to actual saints about whom we know a little: St. Denis of Paris and to the figure of Dionysius in the Book of Acts, who eventually became conflated (this is what comes across in the Golden Legend). With this understanding, the Dionysian corpus exerted tremendous influence over the trajectory of medieval Christian thought.

Although modern historical criticism has rendered the traditional view of authorship untenable, his writings were long revered in both the East and the West as the writings of a great saint.
Reply
#17
(06-16-2015, 11:22 PM)Cyriacus Wrote: You are right.

Little is known about the biography of the actual author, but the treatises were attributed for most of history to actual saints about whom we know a little: St. Denis of Paris and to the figure of Dionysius in the Book of Acts, who eventually became conflated (this is what comes across in the Golden Legend). With this understanding, the Dionysian corpus exerted tremendous influence over the trajectory of medieval Christian thought.

Although modern historical criticism has rendered the traditional view of authorship untenable, his writings were long revered in both the East and the West as the writings of a great saint.

This is not about modern historical criticism. In the DN he even quotes Ignatius, contradicting his pseudonym (709B). Not to mention the whole Plotinus/Proclus influence. In one early council against monophysitism the orthodox party rejected references to him saying if this was the Areopigite St. Cyril would have known his writings.
There are also problems with him, like his view of Eucharist: only those with a pure yearning to God can participate.

I know his influence, and I myself like his writings. But still, not a saint.
Reply
#18
1.  Saint Padre Pio
2. Saint Therese of Lisieux
3. Saint Gemma Galgani
4. Saint Michael the Archangel
5. Saint Bernadette Soubirous

As for those who have not yet been canonized, I am fond of Venerable Fulton Sheen.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)